Rare Book Monthly

Articles - January - 2004 Issue

Eccentricity At the Top:<br>Richard Mentor Johnson

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Perhaps as good a place to go to understand Johnson’s thoughts is a speech he gave during debates over the Missouri Compromise. Enacted in 1820, this compromise limited the extension of slavery into the new territories. During these debates, Johnson defended the extension of slavery. His basic argument is one southerners would use again in the years to come, but I suspect far more disingenuously than Richard Johnson. It’s the one that compares the conditions of poor, working Whites in the North to that of black slaves in the South. It’s hard to believe the sincerity of the argument when espoused by wealthy white southern plantation owners and politicians, but there’s an air of believability in the words of Johnson, who truly sympathized with those workers who would one day become some of his greatest supporters.

Unlike the typical wealthy southern slave owner who welcomed it, Johnson was offended by distinctions of class. Nowhere did he see this as more prevalent than in the North. He recalled arriving in Washington where he saw wealthy citizens riding in luxurious coaches obediently attended by white servants. He was shocked, he recounts, as he thought only black slaves were so servile. On the frontier, there were no such distinctions of class, at least not among Whites. All had to be treated equally. In the cities, however, he saw the precursors of an aristocracy in America.

Johnson looks at the condition of the working poor in the North and asks what is the difference between them and the slaves of the South. He concludes that the difference is only nominal, not one of reality. In one case, servitude is called involuntary because it is imposed by others; in the other it is called voluntary because it is imposed by necessity. To Johnson, that was no real distinction at all. In either case, servitude is forced upon its victim.

Johnson then goes on to say that in some ways the slave is better off. The so-called “free” servant must deal with all the vicissitudes of the marketplace. They must find work, pay their debts, manage illness, find food and clothing, deal with old age, and when poverty turns them astray, suffer imprisonment. The slave, on the other hand, had none of these concerns. He was fed, sheltered, clothed and had no money worries. Considering that finances were a major concern for Johnson throughout his life, this argument must have had some ring of truth to his ears. Johnson points to the white beggars he constantly encountered in the cities. “Among the slaves are no beggars; no vagrants: none idle for want of employ, or crying for want of bread.” And, he had nothing but contempt for the wealthy who condemned black slavery while effectively imposing, in his view, an even worse form of slavery upon poor Whites.

Johnson was not so callous as were many others who were proslavery. He did not paint pictures of happy black slaves, enjoying carefree lives provided by their generous masters. He still said that he could only admit that slavery was a “bitter draught.” Still, he could turn a blind eye to instances of cruelty by comparing them to instances of cruelty by a parent to a child, which does not thereby condemn the institution of family.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> MACHIAVELLI, Niccolò. <i>Nicholas Machiavel's Prince. Also, The life of Castruccio Castracani of Lucca…</i> Translated by Edward Dacres. London, 1640. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> FILSON, John. <i>The Discovery, Settlement and present State of Kentucke: and An Essay towards the Topography, and Natural History of that important Country…</i> Wilmington, Del.: James Adams, 1784. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> ELUARD, Paul. <i>Un poeme dans chaque livre.</i> Paris: Louis Broder, 1956. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> LEWIS, James Otto. [<i>Aboriginal Port Folio.</i> Philadelphia: Published by the Author, 1835-1836]. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> [ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS]. BOOK OF HOURS, use of Rome, in Latin. [Southern Netherlands (Ghent or Bruges), c.1460]. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> MORE, Thomas, Sir. <i>The Workes ... wrytten by him in the Englysh tongue.</i> Edited by William Rastell. London, 1557. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. MORRIS, William. <i>Love is Enough.</i> Hammersmith: The Kelmscott Press, 1897. $5,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph endorsement signed as President (“A. Lincoln”), 24 February 1863. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> WASHINGTON, George. Address panel with autograph free frank signed ("G:o Washington"), as Commander in Chief of the Continental Army, 5 August 1777. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> GOREY, Edward. <i>The Beastly Baby.</i> N.p.: The Fantod Press, 1962. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> FROST, Robert. Photographic reproduction signed and inscribed ("Robert Frost”), to R.V. Thornton, 1955. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> GOREY, Edward. <i>The Bug Book.</i> New York: Looking Glass Library, 1959. $500 to $700.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Book of Hours with Illuminated Miniatures, France, mid-15th century. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Conradus de Alemania [Halberstadt the Elder], <i>Concordantiae Bibliorum,</i> Strassburg, 1474. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Christopher Marlowe, <i>The Jew of Malta,</i> London, 1633. Earliest extant edition of this antiauthoritarian Elizabethan play. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b><br>Sir Isaac Newton, <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy,</i> first edition in English, 2 volumes, London, 1729. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> John Rae, <i>Narrative of an Expedition to the Shores of the Arctic Sea in 1846 and 1847,</i> first edition, London, 1850. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Philip Pittman, <i>The Present State of the European Settlements on the Mississippi…,</i> first edition, London, 1770. $10,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Cyanotype of an anatomy class at Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1895. $300 to $400.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Equine veterinary formulary, manuscript on paper, East Earl, Pennsylvania, circa 1860. $400 to $600.
  • <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> REGAMEY, Felix (1844-1906). Unique drawing showing Verlaine and Rimbaud in London, September 1872. €70,000 to 100,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> LABORDE, Alexandre de (1773-1842). <i>Voyage pittoresque et historique de l’Espagne.</i> Paris : 1806-1820. €20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> BOCCACE, Jean (1313-1375). <i>Il Decamerone…</i> Venise : Gabriele Giolito di Ferrari, 1542.<br>€ 12,000 to 15,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> LAMBERT, Yvon (1936). Full collection of writings from <i>Une rêverie émanée de mes loisirs.</i> Paris : 1992 - 2018. €50,000 to 70,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> JOUVE, Paul (1878-1973) -- KIPLING, Rudyard (1865-1936). <i>La Chasse de Kaa.</i> Paris : Javal & Bourdeaux, 1930. €2,000 to 3,000

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