Rare Book Monthly

Articles - January - 2004 Issue

Eccentricity At the Top:<br>Richard Mentor Johnson

Tecumseh

Death of Tecumseh from frieze of American History in the Capitol Rotunda. Col. Johnson fires the fatal shot. Courtesy of Architect of the Capitol.


And, sometime during that battle, the injured Johnson would be attacked by an Indian, weapon in hand. Johnson would lift his gun quickly enough to beat the Indian to the punch. But who was that Indian? There were conflicting opinions at the time, and the answer most likely will never be known. He was probably another faceless Brave, like so many other faceless soldiers who have died in so many wars, quickly forgotten by history. However, some people believed that Indian was none other than the great Chief Tecumseh himself. Johnson, while somewhat cagey about making actual claims, certainly never did anything to dispel that notion. While the claim is considered somewhat doubtful today, at the time most people were convinced that it was Johnson who killed the mighty Indian Chief. Clearly Tecumseh was killed by Johnson’s troops that morning, and what became of his remains is still a mystery.

The legend arose, and this legend, more than anything else, would propel Johnson all the way to the vice-presidency over two decades later. And it was from this day that the famous campaign slogan would be born: “Rumpsey Dumpsey, Rumpsey Dumpsey, Col. Johnson killed Tecumseh.” This slogan might not play that well today, but evidently in 1836, it was as powerful as “a chicken in every pot,” “morning in America,” or “he kept us out of war.”

Johnson returned to Congress a hero. Now very popular among his constituents he would be elevated to the senate in 1819. This despite his support for the unpopular Compensation Act of 1816 which for the first time granted members of Congress a regular salary. Johnson always needed money, which was the source of most of his shortcomings. He would serve in the senate for the next ten years, for the most part relatively undistinguished, with a couple of remarkable exceptions. It was also during this time that his name would become somewhat tarnished, though never truly darkened. Johnson suffered from the problems that many landowners experienced. While relatively wealthy, he never had enough cash. Along the way, he steered some government contracts his brothers’, his own, and his friends’ ways. He always seemed to be involved in some money-making enterprise. Certainly by today’s standards he would have been in deep trouble for conflict of interest. Even under the looser standards of his day, some found him ethically challenged. Johnson, like Nixon, was “not a crook.” He probably never thought he did anything wrong, but financial needs led him to stretch the boundaries on occasion.

Perhaps his own financial difficulties led Johnson to continue to identify with the “little man.” This naturally drew Johnson to Andrew Jackson, the champion of the common people. Johnson was a loyal Jackson supporter, and it was this loyalty that would eventually bring him his nomination for vice-president in 1836. And four years later, when even Jackson abandoned him, it was out of fear that Johnson had become a political liability, not because Jackson no longer liked him.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> MACHIAVELLI, Niccolò. <i>Nicholas Machiavel's Prince. Also, The life of Castruccio Castracani of Lucca…</i> Translated by Edward Dacres. London, 1640. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> FILSON, John. <i>The Discovery, Settlement and present State of Kentucke: and An Essay towards the Topography, and Natural History of that important Country…</i> Wilmington, Del.: James Adams, 1784. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> ELUARD, Paul. <i>Un poeme dans chaque livre.</i> Paris: Louis Broder, 1956. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> LEWIS, James Otto. [<i>Aboriginal Port Folio.</i> Philadelphia: Published by the Author, 1835-1836]. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> [ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS]. BOOK OF HOURS, use of Rome, in Latin. [Southern Netherlands (Ghent or Bruges), c.1460]. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> MORE, Thomas, Sir. <i>The Workes ... wrytten by him in the Englysh tongue.</i> Edited by William Rastell. London, 1557. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. MORRIS, William. <i>Love is Enough.</i> Hammersmith: The Kelmscott Press, 1897. $5,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph endorsement signed as President (“A. Lincoln”), 24 February 1863. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> WASHINGTON, George. Address panel with autograph free frank signed ("G:o Washington"), as Commander in Chief of the Continental Army, 5 August 1777. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> GOREY, Edward. <i>The Beastly Baby.</i> N.p.: The Fantod Press, 1962. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> FROST, Robert. Photographic reproduction signed and inscribed ("Robert Frost”), to R.V. Thornton, 1955. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> GOREY, Edward. <i>The Bug Book.</i> New York: Looking Glass Library, 1959. $500 to $700.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Book of Hours with Illuminated Miniatures, France, mid-15th century. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Conradus de Alemania [Halberstadt the Elder], <i>Concordantiae Bibliorum,</i> Strassburg, 1474. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Christopher Marlowe, <i>The Jew of Malta,</i> London, 1633. Earliest extant edition of this antiauthoritarian Elizabethan play. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b><br>Sir Isaac Newton, <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy,</i> first edition in English, 2 volumes, London, 1729. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> John Rae, <i>Narrative of an Expedition to the Shores of the Arctic Sea in 1846 and 1847,</i> first edition, London, 1850. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Philip Pittman, <i>The Present State of the European Settlements on the Mississippi…,</i> first edition, London, 1770. $10,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Cyanotype of an anatomy class at Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1895. $300 to $400.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Equine veterinary formulary, manuscript on paper, East Earl, Pennsylvania, circa 1860. $400 to $600.
  • <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> REGAMEY, Felix (1844-1906). Unique drawing showing Verlaine and Rimbaud in London, September 1872. €70,000 to 100,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> LABORDE, Alexandre de (1773-1842). <i>Voyage pittoresque et historique de l’Espagne.</i> Paris : 1806-1820. €20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> BOCCACE, Jean (1313-1375). <i>Il Decamerone…</i> Venise : Gabriele Giolito di Ferrari, 1542.<br>€ 12,000 to 15,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> LAMBERT, Yvon (1936). Full collection of writings from <i>Une rêverie émanée de mes loisirs.</i> Paris : 1992 - 2018. €50,000 to 70,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> JOUVE, Paul (1878-1973) -- KIPLING, Rudyard (1865-1936). <i>La Chasse de Kaa.</i> Paris : Javal & Bourdeaux, 1930. €2,000 to 3,000

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