• <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Doyle, Online-Only Auction, 20th Century Literature, Nov 15:</b> Ernest Hemingway, <i>A Farewell To Arms,</i> 1929. $500 to $800
    <b>Doyle, Online-Only Auction, 20th Century Literature, Nov 15:</b> William Faulkner, <i>Go Down Moses,</i> 1942. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, Online-Only Auction, 20th Century Literature, Nov 15:</b> Jack Kerouac, <i>Vanity Of Dulouz,</i> 1968. $250-350
    <b>Doyle, Online-Only Auction, 20th Century Literature, Nov 15:</b> Gertrude Stein, <i>The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,</i> 1933. $150-250
    <b>Doyle, Online-Only Auction, 20th Century Literature, Nov 15:</b> John Steinbeck, Three first editions. Comprising <i>Of Mice and Men, Covici-Friede,</i> 1937. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, Online-Only Auction, 20th Century Literature, Nov 15:</b> Dalton Trumbo, <i>Johnny Got His Gun,</i> 1939. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, Online-Only Auction, 20th Century Literature, Nov 15:</b> Evelyn Waugh, <i>Vile Bodies,</i> 1930. $400 to $600
  • <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Illuminated manuscript on parchment with gold leaf initial words – Seder Tikunei Shabbat by the Arizal (Pressburg, 1744). $30,000 to $40,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Manuscript on parchment – Hilchot HaRif on many tractates – personal copy of Rabbi Shlomo Luria, the Maharshal, with his signatures and glosses – Spain, 14th century. $400,000 to $500,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> The Ramchal Machzor – His personal copy with hundreds of Kabbalistic glosses handwritten by the Ramchal. $300,000 to $500,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Passport of Rebbe Aharon Rokeach of Belz – with his photograph and signature – issued in preparation for leaving Eretz Israel during the War of Independence. $40,000 to $60,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Keter HaRabbanut –Certificate of appointment of Rebbe Yoel Teitelbaum of Satmar, author of Divrei Yoel, as Rabbi of Satmar – 1928. $120,000 to $150,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Sipurei Ma’asiot by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov – First edition (Ostroh, 1815) – handwritten correction by Rabbi Natan of Breslov and unknown title page. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Five Books of the Torah with the Or HaChaim Commentary – two volumes – first edition (Venice, 1741). $60,000 to $80,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> The Inquisition of Bologna – Collection of handwritten documents – trials and investigations of Jews by the Inquisition of Bologna (15th century). $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Theodor Herzl – ‘The Jewish State’ – First edition in original wrappers (Vienna-Leipzig, 1896). $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Collection of newspapers printed on the day of Israel’s Declaration of Independence – Jerusalem, 1948. $6,000 to $10,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Declaration of Independence of Israel – Final draft of Israel’s Scroll of Independence with invitation and ticket to the Declaration session. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Kedem, Nov. 13:</b> Twenty-five photographs – Visit of the German Emperor Wilhelm II to Palestine, 1898. $6,000 to $10,000
  • <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers:<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts.<br>November 13, 2018</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman, Nov. 13:</b> LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph letter signed ("A. Lincoln"), as President, to Montgomery Blair. Washington, D. C., September 23 1864. Lincoln requests Blair’s resignation. $30,000 to $50,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman, Nov. 13:</b> WILDE, Oscar. <i>Lady Windermere's Fan.</i> London: Elkin Mathews and John Lane, 1893. First edition, presentation copy inscribed by Wilde to George Alexander. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman, Nov. 13:</b> MILLER, Henry. <i>The Tropic of Cancer.</i> Paris: Obelisk Press, [1934]. FIRST edition, presentation copy, with an original watercolor by Miller, and inscribed by Miller. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers:<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts.<br>November 13, 2018</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman, Nov. 13:</b> AUSTEN, Jane. <i>Emma.</i> London: for John Murray, 1816. First edition. $8,000 to $10,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman, Nov. 13:</b> LONGFELLOW, Henry Wadsworth. <i>The Song of Hiawatha.</i> London: W. Kent & Co., 1860. $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman, Nov. 13:</b> [JACKSON, Andrew]. Hickory walking stick presented to Francis Preston Blair. Handle with inset engraved plaque with a globe and text reading: "A. Jackson to F. P. Blair," 36 1/2-in. in length. $2,000 to $3,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman, Nov. 13:</b> [LINCOLN, Abraham -- ASSASSINATION]. <i>Ford's Theatre...Friday Evening, April 14th, 1865.</i> Washington, D. C.: H. Polkinhorn & Son, 1865. $3,000 to $4,000

Rare Book Monthly

New Letter

Letters to the Editor

. June 02, 2005

Dear Mr. McKinney,

Michael Stillman's review of my little "publishing promotions" catalog was greatly appreciated. To be included among rather spectacular catalogs by some of our finest booksellers was indeed a thrill. I read every word of AE for the knowledge to be gained to be sure, but as with Michael's review the writing is generally of very high quality and hard to put down (so to speak).

As a new dealer and a fairly specialized one - mostly modern poetry, I have not yet become a "full-fledged" member of AE's community. You have and are certainly helping me more than I could ever have expected.

Thank you. Please thank Michael for his review and for understanding that some of those little items may be quite collectible some day.

Best regards,

Mark Alexander - Alexander Rare Books


. June 02, 2005

Hi Bruce:

I have been receiving your monthly publication for at least a year (I think it started arriving last February--2004, but I could be wrong) and I want to thank you for the excellent articles and for their content and scope.

Like most older dealers, I started out of my house in 1961 running a part-time book search service. In those days, this consisted of writing lots of letters to lots of dealers looking for a specific title or author, according to the wants of a few "customers". Sales were few, but I met a lot of nice dealers around the world as I specialized in polar expeditions for 30 years.

Now that we have www, the trade has changed considerably, as you are well aware. Now, a dealer can reach any house in the world to inquire about their inventory, or a host of other items. It has made the task much easier, and also damned near unnecessary.

I still have several clients who are interested in special areas of collecting and call upon me to help them, but generally the e-bay culture has made it so easy to find out if a volume is available in a matter of minutes, instead of days. Additionally the ability to search using the ABE and other book listings make pricing much easier.

Again, I want to thank you for your excellent service. I am interested in joining your service, if you would be kind enough to direct me to the proper search entry. Meanwhile, thank you for the articles and for the consistent updates on items of interest. Best wishes.

Ron Weir
Collector's Cache
Roseburg, OR., 97470


. June 02, 2005

I would like to thank Renee Magriel Roberts for her article mentioning
U-PIC Insurance Services. We do take great pride in providing our
clients with the best rates and fast turn around on claims. From the
article we have had two inquires so far as to what our insurance can do
for them. I would like to send a thank you to Renee Roberts for
referring business to us. Again, Many Thanks!


. June 02, 2005

RE: "M is for M-Bag" by Renee Magriel Roberts from June 2005 AE Monthly.

You might be interested to know that Australia Post has this same type of shipping. It is called Print post direct bag international. It is seamail to most of the world but airmail is available to Asia. Minimum of 5 kilo, maximum of 16 kilo. Cost seamail $4.95au per kilo (minimum $24.75au), cost airmail $6au per kilo (minumum charge $30au).


Thanks for an interesting newsletter.


. May 24, 2005

I am sending this note to suggest another topic for a future article.

Would you discuss the workings of m-bags? My post office is clueless about this so I can't ask them. How fast are they?

Regards!

Mary

for

Angie's Bookshelf


Editor's Note: Renee Roberts will be writing about this topic for the June 2005 edition of AE Monthly.


? February 01, 2005

Says who Mr. Stillman? hmmmmm........why not just toss all those original oil paintings from Rembrandt and Van Gogh and, aw what the heck, ya don't need to preserve those Pyramids down in Egypt and while your at it, that Colliseum in Rome and Acropo-whatever-they-call-it over there in Athens, well, hell, the historians can study the digitized parts of it. We need parking lots to park the cars with all the people Mr. Stillman thinks should be using their time and money more "productively". Go figure.


Response:

The above comments pertain to the last paragraph of the article on recent book thefts. Click here to read the article.

The paragraph discussed questioned the importance of libraries having vast sums of money tied up in rare old books in the digital age, as these books become readily available in digitized form online. I think the writer has somewhat misunderstood my point. The issue is not whether these old books should be preserved. It is a question of what role a particular library sees itself playing in its community. To the extent it sees its role as preservation of physical copies, something like a museum, its rare book collections remain relevant. However, if a library sees its role as providing information to its patrons, in this case, the information within these books, then investing large sums in rare old books may no longer make sense. Buying one of the few, expensive copies extant of an old book made sense when this was the only way to make its text available to patrons or researchers, but once the library can make that text available in other, less expensive ways, it may choose to shift some of those dollars from purchasing expensive physical copies to making additional text and information from less expensive sources (digital) available to its patrons. Again, it's a matter of what the individual library sees as its role, and if it is both providing information and preservation, just what that balance should be.

Mike Stillman


a December 19, 2004

Your reviewer, Ms. Roberts, seems to have gotten what we intended from the major works, but we find the tone in reviewing Book Collecting for Fun & Profit to be somewhat less positive.

Understand we do not wish to pick a fight with an organization that's provided free positive publicity for our publications, but we are obligated to defend our work.

Specific disagreements:

1. Our revision was prepared in 2001 for 2002 publication. How then could we be "ignoring" your web site, which we cannot find existed before 2002, the date of your earliest monthly issue? In 2001, far less was available on the internet than is now. Google was one of a dozen or so search engines out there, not the predominant first choice it is now. And the information available in 2001 was also of varying completeness, accuracy and universality. So while the number of resources on the internet has increased, we did not "ignore" the basic resource that the internet is, though we did not mention specifically all of possibly useful sites for reasons of space availability. Should we prepare a third edition, we would naturally point to the internet as a great resource for bibliographical information. {Though just now, I could not find an on-line bibliography with descriptive information and points of issue of either Mark Twain or William Faulkner available as an on-line resource. Hmmmmmm.]

2. "Tantalizing" reference to changing "browsing as we know it"? Glad to tantalize, but I think the conclusion is clearly stated without belaboring it.

3. Everyone starts as an "amateur" in the pure sense of the word and all its radiated meanings: one who loves the activity for its own sake, not for profit. Our guide was for just such a person, one who loves books and loves finding them, touching them, reading them, using them for their intended purpose, and then, perhaps, valuing them as rarities. We wrote this book for the beginner, yet included information that I do not believe any bookseller, regardless of experience, would know automatically. One of those who read the text was Everett Whitlock, manager for almost 50 years of Whitlock Farm Booksellers in Bethany, Connecticut, and whose family was in the rare book business for all of the 20th Century and part of the 19th and 21st. He found information about terminology with which he was unfamiliar. So, thin as it is, our book contains the starting point for anyone, regardless of experience, from none to lots, to begin collecting with some knowledge at hand.

4. Our statements on valuing are "simplistic"? In what way? Are they inaccurate? Is the list incomplete as to what makes a book valuable? Is the list in the wrong order? What further should we have included? Criticism without correction is valueless for both your audience and for the author always seeking a better product.

5. "Post your best and see what happens" is "silly and inadequate"? Again, lacking the Great Corrector's Red Pencil, I would need to know at least a tantalizing hint of what would have been preferred.

In today's internet book market, there is a huge saturation of almost any title from $5-$500 in current market value, and many even highly valued and priced items.

Two examples:

A fellow bookdealer not involved in rare books is offered a set of the works of Charles Dudley Warner, limited edition of 612 sets with volume 1 containing a CDW-related original manuscript page and in fine leather bindings. Containing two works co-authored with Mark Twain, a desirable set, of which a scant number were printed. Rare? One would think. The dealer asked me to help determine value. A quick look on ABEbooks found at least a dozen sets from $650-2500! Valuable, one would agree, but desirable, maybe not. This illustrates our basic statement that rarity does not equal value.

A local museum mounts a major exhibition; a fat catalog is prepared with a definitive text. One printing is made, fixing the quantity available. Some years later, an unknown cataloguer is the very first to put this item for sale on the internet and unilaterally decides the book is worth, say, $300.00. All cataloguers from then on would use that price as a benchmark, though that would not necessarily mean the book is worth, on average, $300.00. Only that all copies catalogued would be worth more or less than $300.00 based on condition and seller's desire to sell. But if nobody finds this book worth $300, here's what happens: anyone cataloguing it from then on, who looks it up before posting his copy, would add to the quantity available. But not necessarily add to the placement of any copy in the hands of someone who wanted or needed it because the price would still be beyond what any buyer would agree that it is worth. Fortunately, the establishment of such benchmarks is becoming harder and harder to create as almost any title is available with multiple copies to choose from. But the principle sustains.

All goods being equal, if they ever are in used anything, nobody smarter than a geranium would seek anything but the best price/best condition combination. But to compete (meaning: sell books) in such an overloaded marketplace as a seller, one needs to consider whether the desire to receive the top price for a given item is more or less important that getting any price at all, that is, selling it. So the seller is guided in our book to get his books out there and let the marketplace decide if his are the ones to buy. Evaluate, grade, describe, price, post. Again, a geranium can do it. And what could be more obvious?

6. Shipping? In thirty years of packing and shipping books as we describe, we have never had a book
lost, damaged or found to have arrived in anything but completely acceptable condition anywhere in
the world. As to what is the "well-presented product" I cannot imagine. If that means wrapping in tissue, then brown paper, then bubblewrap, then a double box, sure that looks great on arrival. But what's wanted is not the elaborate overkill of wrappings, but what's inside. Once the wraps are off, they are discarded. Our intent was to descibe a safe, efficient, simple way to pack and ship, one that cannot endanger the books, and one proven successful for a long time. Maybe "well-presented" means a battery-powered fanfare that plays when shipments are opened? Tut-tut-ta-DAAAAAAAAAA!

[Note: This letter continued in next message]


a December 19, 2004



7. Auction Records as helpers for pricing. An auction is a snapshot of particular value for a particular item at a particular moment, not the establishment of THE price for a like item. Auction records are only valuable in their descriptions so that one can establish the amount of equivalence between what was sold at Swann's and what you have in your hands. Even auction records culled from sales over many years and sales do not necessarily fix value for any item as its variance in condition or provenance alters value as does, as the auctioneers say, the "money in the room". Changes in collecting, specific author popularity peaks, fads and fantasies all come into play. When Salman Rushdie published "The Satanic Verses" and was condemned by the Ayatollah, the book spiked in value. Now it can be had for a fraction of that top price. Thus auction records from 1989-90 might suggest the value at $500. Not anymore.

8. The global marketplace. Again, I point out that when we created the 2nd edition in 2001, the global internet was only beginning. We did not "ignore" it as it is implied in the section about the internet being the World? Greatest Price Guide. We do not exclude any available internet bookselling venue as a potential source for information.

9. Half of our title says "Building a Book Collection" and about half the book is devoted to the beginner, getting the feet wet without standing one one's head and drowning to do it. Perhaps some of what we say is too obvious to the advanced seller, but then, isn't it good that we inform that beginner about the terminology, scope, methods, and realities of the book collecting dodge rather than let them wander into a bookshop blind, deaf and mute?

10. Internet fraud? Again, without particulars, there is no hope of improvement, which we always seek. If the reviewer means mispresentation of goods, failure to deliver, failure to refund, or any other like problem, these are covered in one's credit card, PayPal and bank literature as to what remedies are available. Some things need not be said within the scope of a book like ours. What we do not say we should say, you do not say.


Bill McBride


Editor's Note

In reviewing the three McBride books, bookseller Renee Magriel Roberts recommended two, the titles on identifying first editions and on points of issue, but did not find the one on book collecting sufficiently helpful. To quote the musical artist "Meatloaf," "two out of three ain't bad." The following link will take you to Ms. Roberts' original article, which includes a link at the end to the McBride site where these books may be purchased: McBride Books Website.


anya November 12, 2004

If you have information about this book " White House CookBook" can you let me know. I have one of them , it belongs to my mother and I cannot find any history on it. It was printed in 1907.
Thank you ,

Anya




Reponse:

If what you have is the Ziemann/Gillette cookbook, it was first published in 1887 by Fanny Gillette. Apparently Mrs. Gillette had no connection with the White House, but due to the book's success, she co-authored later editions with Hugo Ziemann. Ziemann was a respected chef and steward, apparently having worked for some of the finest hotels and as caterer to the exiled son of Napolean III. He also had served as steward to President Grover Cleveland. Mrs. Gillette lived to be 98, but no one lives forever, though books may, so the White House Cook Book has been continued by others. The most recent edition appeared in 1999, and included recipes from Hillary Clinton and Barbara Bush. I don't know what the value of your edition of this book is, but probably low to mid double digits depending on condition.

AE


Marcus October 02, 2004

Ken Leach has lived and worked out of his home in Brattleborough,
Vermont, for the past 30 +++ years. I believe he began in N.H. but that
was long ago. Glad you are working on his catalogues as he has sold
interesting material for ages. He is now in poor health and no longer
very active -- but he is still at it!!

+o+o+o+o+o+o+o+o+o+o+o

Marcus A. McCorison

3601 Knightsbridge Close

Worcester, MA. 01609-1161

508-791-3668

mamcc@att.net


none October 01, 2004

Good morning everyone,

I enjoyed your article on Forum's virtual tour and just wanted to let you know that we have had a virtual tour of our shop for the last 2 1/2 years and we are only 300 miles form you. You might want to give it a try at www.heritagebookshop.com. Always enjoy your AE monthly.

Best till later,


Nat Des Marais

Heritage Book Shop, Inc

8540 Melrose Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90069

nd@heritagebookshop.com

(310) 659-3674

FAX: 659-4872


Joel K September 27, 2004

Based on your basic structure, I'm sending along a couple of links you might want to see. I had actually published an article on the book search engines on the web in the waning issues of Mercators World.

See:

1. www.theprimemeridian.com/collectorguide.htm. This will come out in print form in the winter issue of The Portolan (journal of the Washington Map Society), and will be updated online two or three times a year. The hard part will be keeping it brief.

2. www.theprimemeridian.com/webbooks.html. This has been available for some time, and although in format much different than your article on the book search engines, I think the ultimate conclusions re: ABE aren't that far off.


Regards. Joel Kovarsky

Joel Kovarsky for THE PRIME MERIDIAN

385 Thistle Trail, Danville, VA 24540 USA

Phone: 434/724-1106; Fax: 434/799-0218

email: tpm@theprimemeridian.com

Website: www.theprimemeridian.com/webbooks.html.

Member, International Antiquarian Mapsellers Association


. September 07, 2004

I read Michael Stillman's article with the interest of someone who sells books on the internet (through Tom Folio.com, the site of a co-op of independent booksellers) and one who buys nearly daily. I was not surprised that Mr. Stillman found the sites limited. They are indeed. The most useful book search in my experience is the mega-search Bookfinder. com. I looked up Stillman's test title and turned up 28 plus copies immediately. Froogle will be a powerful tool soon, but Bookfinder is the best book search now.

Samuel Hough

The Owl at the Bridge

25 Berwick Lane

Cranston, Rhode Island (USA) 02905-3708

401-467-7362

Our TomFolio site: http://www.tomfolio.com/shop/OwlBridge/default.asp

Our own website: http://www.owlbridge.com/


. August 04, 2004

You probably know by now that Bruce Evan McKinney has gotten himself into
some hot water with at least one ABAA member. One must be careful about
calling certain people "a liar." Some people take this very seriously.

My concerns, raised to Mr. McKinney in the past, is that the same dealers,
who are specialists in Americana, seem to be singled out, for their
catalogues, for biographies, etc. Did you do a report on Glenn Horowitz,
and the deal he did with the media giant in England, when he sold him a
collection of FDR letters for about $3 million, and then appraised them at
something like $8 to $12 million. This was covered by the NY Times, and
is being investigated by the Federal Government, including, I think, the
Attorney General, and maybe the SEC.

I know that the young woman who was writing for you had once worked for
Glenn Horowitz, so you may not wish to cover that.

You must broaden your approach to the book business, and try not to
compete with dealers, and be "fair and balanced," unlike the Fox News
Channel, if you are going to gain the confidence of the approximately 500 dealers in the ABAA. Also, it would be a good idea to not irritate the membership by soliciting members, and handing out surveys on or within a mile of the premises of one of the ABAA Fairs.

Sincerely,


Bruce J. Ramer



Response

Dear Mr. Ramer,

I enjoy the book business and understand there will sometimes be disputes and always two sides. We provide services to enable the field to obtain information quickly. We don’t sell books although many members do.

We are always looking at potential stories. Allegations however are only allegations although you may have already reached a verdict both about Mr. Horowitz and the Americana Exchange.



Our site is open to all persons who find it of value. For those who do not, maybe we will meet again in the future.

Bruce McKinney

AE


. August 04, 2004

It has been three years since I took the plunge into the somewhat dusty cheerfulness of dealing in used books. This intriguing world with its tantalizing discoveries and fascinating folks is one I would love to share with your readers. From the precious entries in a handwritten, original Civil War era canal diary discovered tucked away in my late father's library, to the local connection with abolitionist John Brown and two very rare, signed Zane Grey novels that have recently come into my possession, (and many stories in between) I believe I can involve readers who love books on a personal level. Please contact me if I've piqued your interest.


Lachlan McIntosh


Editor's Note

Lachlan McIntosh forgot to include a contact address. Please give us one. Thanks.


. August 04, 2004

Hello. We've discussed these website ranking articles on the discussion boards at Abebooks.com, and someone mentioned an important caveat: these rankings would be much more useful if they tracked book BUYER hits. The relative strength of Abebooks.com, for example, is perhaps skewed, as book sellers routinely use Abebooks' advanced search feature in looking up books that they intend to list, rather than buy. So, many of the hits, perhaps even the majority of them, as Abebooks announces that its sellers are listing 50,000 new books a day, are not coming from the most important demographic, the book buyers. I believe that this would be important to mention in a followup as it pertains to all book websites, albeit to
different levels. Thanks.

--Greg Delzer

Defunct Books


ShawnB July 31, 2004

Saturday 31 July 2004

Re: Your column on: The NYHS and Gilder-Lehrman

Dear Mr. Stillman:

Your column gets at the complex reasons donors give. I personally think it will be fine for the G-L collection to the housed at the NYHS because collections are increasingly becoming electronic. We will see, if we have not already seen (and I simply haven't noticed), that online exhibitions will begin to include displays from multiple locations, all in a single show. The story of Jefferson and the Lewis and Clarke exhibition can potentially include material on electronic (loan?) from the Smithsonian, the University of Virginia, the University of Nebraska, various private collectors and of course the New York Historical Society. The curator will electronically review all material for potential inclusion, select and sequence the presentation and write the accompanying text - all the while the materials sit safely under glass and under lock and key. The curator may in fact be someone who never travels but is hardly ever home.

This is the way exhibits are going to be and the NYHS should take the lead to curate these national shows and in that way turn their supposed weakness into a substantial strength. That will secure for themselves the G-L collection and provide leadership in the museum field to extend the reach of historical collections into the farthest classroom.

The NYHS is only operating under a disadvantage if they think they are. It's clear however they are not.

Sincerely yours,

Shawn Grey



Writer's Response

Very interesting points. The nature of what is in the NYHS collection, or that of any other institution, remains important so long as the display, even if online, is only from its own materials. However, once you move to online displays using material from other institutions, then what is in the collection of any one institution is irrelevant. The NYHS could end up putting on the world's finest displays of European history despite having nothing pertaining to that subject in its collection. In fact, it wouldn't have to have a collection at all. In this situation, you could simply store all of your historical material, or one copy of documents of which there are many, in a common place like the Smithsonian, and anyone, institution, corporation, or private individual, could put on an exhibition. What role a repository like the NYHS would play in that world is not clear to me, but it sounds very different from any they have played in the past.

Fortunately for now, there are a lot of older people like me who still feel a certain awe in seeing if not touching the actual object, so there remains a place for the live as well as the online exhibition. As to whether the next generation, raised in a virtual world on a computer screen, will feel the same is not so clear.


Michael Stillman






. July 06, 2004

I understand the approach taken in your recent article, but find it a bit short-sighted. While some people want to rate everything in site (public opinion polls, Nielsen ratings, etc.), and perhaps make many decisions according to these computer generated lists, I suspect there are more discerning collectors and casual enthusiasts out there. I rather doubt that Google rankings alone are a reasonable arbiter of success. I won't quibble with the phenomenon of Ebay, or that more people may use one or another search site, but I suspect many discerning collectors or interested amateurs have different perspectives. The questions of material quality and focus, dealer experience, and other issues may influence many buyers not just browsing for the cheapest copy of a relatively common book. Perhaps you would not argue the point. I just think that your article is a bit short sighted with regards to advising both collectors and dealers, especially those who may elect not to run their lives by these rankings. Still, that isn't to say uselful information may not be gleaned, just that the singularity of the approach seems heavy handed and a bit intellectually narrow. I am not attempting to underestimate the need for some degree of digital sophistication in dealing with web issues, particularly if one wishes to attract younger clientel so heavily tied to this digital world. I am a bit curious about your statement: internet users are very unforgiving. One might push you on the validity and validation of that point, but I'm sure there are enough conflicting assertions to go around.

Regards. Joel Kovarsky for THE PRIME MERIDIAN

www.theprimemeridian.com


. July 01, 2004

I found the statistics from the new search which you mentioned more than slightly  suspicious and unreliable. It is hard to believe that the
defunct site Bibliofind.com which now only feeds into Amazon's zshops, is ranked at #20.  Contrast this to Alexa's rankings - which has Bibliofind ranked over 2 million (2,745,395 the day I looked) - a ranking which seems much more accurate than #20!

Even the respective positions of Abebooks.com and Alibris are reversed on Alexa with ABE being noticeably higher ranked than Alibris (3811 vs 5602).

Chris Volk



Editor’s Response

I think your points about the reliability of Web Search are well-taken, but that the same can be said of the Alexa results too. Each is based on a very small sample, and while this may be acceptable under circumstances that assure the samples are representative, Web Search and Alexa base their results on people who use their toolbars, which may or may not be representative.

Alexa results might appear to be a bit more tainted for use in the book field. Alexa is owned by Amazon, and they caution that their results may be skewed by having more Amazon users than is typical of the net. However, looking at their results, there’s no obvious signs of distortion. In either case, both of these sites warn of things that will distort results, among them the fact that they gather results only from the Internet Explorer browser (meaning AOL search results are ignored), and Windows software (meaning Apple users are ignored).

Another significant factor is the make-up of their audience. For example, anyone downloading one of these toolbars is likely to be more web-savvy than the average websurfer. Such people may prefer different types of sites to the average visitor. Alexa cautions to be particularly careful when rankings get below 100,000, as the number of visitors to these sites vis a vis the number of people using their toolbar may make it hard to accurately reflect results. I think these rankings should carry the same caution you see in the sports betting lines in the newspaper: “these predictions should be used for entertainment purposes only.” They can provide a useful, general view of what’s happening, but don’t bet your lifesavings on them.

Sites showing up in the first few thousand are clearly very highly visited. Those with rankings within the first few hundred thousand are more viewed than those of over 500,000 or a million. A ranking in the hundreds of thousands is a very good performance for a niche site (for example, a bookseller’s website), though not for a large portal like Yahoo. These services can provide a useful guide for those evaluating websites, but should not be taken too literally when it comes to their rankings.


cyb June 09, 2004

All you "Book People" out to say Goliaht, to bookavenue.com. The fees are quite fair. I have my inventory listed there-what I have been able to get done so far-and am pleased with my web page there. I will continue to list the rest of my inventory there. My web page is http://www.bookavenue.com/hosted/crew1234. You will also find my phone number and address if you are looking for certain books. I have quite a variety too numerous to list. So long, Cecilia Toccoa, Georgia 706:776-1060


wklimon May 01, 2004

Michael Stillman should note the following discussion from *The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare*, ed. M. Dobson & S. Wells (Oxford, 2001), s.v. "Shakespeare as a surname": "Over 80 spellings of the name are recorded by E.K. Chambers (*William Shakespeare*, 1930), including 'Shaxpere' in the marriage license and 'Shaxberd' in the Revels account. Shakespeare uses variant forms in his surviving signatures, but the now standard spelling predominates, sometimes hyphenated, in printed documents including the dedications to the poems and the Folio. 'Shakespear', popular in the 18th century, was used by [George Bernard] Shaw; another spelling reformer, F.J. Furnivall, preferred 'Shakspear'."

Best regards,

William M. Klimon


none April 02, 2004

"....And then there’s the behemoth from the North." The monster from the North is singular i.e Microsoft. Therefore you should use Behemah, the singular. Best wishes.


Editor's note: This pertains to the article "Abe increases rates; Alibris is going public; what's next for the book sites?" in the April issue of AE Monthly.


Rick April 01, 2004

Michael Stillman gives us a nice and probably accurate picture of online bookselling today. And, indeed a good big man generally beats a good little man. There are a group of us, however, ready to play David in this convention of Goliaths. We think we've got a pretty good stone to fling, AB Bookman's Weekly, (Click Here),
We are all book people, and that is, in itself, an advantage, and while we aren't rah, rah enough to predict victory, we will be a factor, count on it.


drhbooks December 08, 2003

I found the article on book prices very interesting and only a little alarming. I think that it is about a year behind the curve actually. It lacks an important qualifier, or perhaps this wasn't stated clearly enough in the article. If you are buying the cheapest copy, make sure you really are buying the copy you want. Many times the cheapest copy is a reprint that is misdescribed as a first, or a rebound copy with no notice of rebinding, or a copy that someone inexperienced regards as 'good for it's age'.....I have heard from many book collector's who bought the cheapest copy and then were stuck with the problem of returning an inferior copy. Two expressions come to mind... 'buy cheap/ buy twice' and 'the cheapest man pays the most'. As we enter the age where everyone is a bookseller the ability to recognize what you are selling is not without value.


David Holloway

Virginia


Susan Alon December 03, 2003

I've never been a bookseller, but I have been in other businesses and seen what happens in changing times. re. previous email I have an open shop in a small town, with 4,500 priced, I hope wisely, titles.  If I feel a book is worth what I ask, just because there are several other copies for less, my book comes with my experience, and if Stillman doesn't understand what that means as an antiquarian, that is why he is writing these kind kind of articles.  Let's discuss..


Susan Alon MA, MFA, MLS


Miriam Green Antiquarian

Clinton CONN


Writer's Response


Susan,


I think you somewhat misunderstand my point. I am in no way disparaging the contributions made by knowledgable booksellers nor questioning their value. I am simply making an observation on what are clearly changing times, what I believe the future will bring, and how that prediction, if it comes to pass, will affect booksellers. And while I admit that I am not nor have ever been a bookseller, and do not begin to possess the knowledge of antiquarian books that you have, I do have one credential that I believe makes my opinions at least worthy of consideration by those in the trade. I am a consumer.


My point is not that your skills aren't important and valuable. It is simply this: I have seen knowledge and experience brushed aside for lower prices time and again over the course of my life. It started with the helpful neighborhood grocer/butcher who was replaced by the supermarket. Then there was the local appliance shop where they could tell you all about the latest gadgets. We now buy them at Wal Mart where the help, if you can find them, know next to nothing. In the new book field, we have already seen the neighborhood shops replaced first by chain bookstores, then megastores like B&N and Borders, and finally Amazon.com. And while I truly appreciated the man at the service station who made sure my oil wasn't low, my tires properly inflated, and took care of the work, I still find myself pumping gas at a convenience store to save a nickel. We consumers, or at least most of us, have a nasty habit of going for the lowest price, even as we whine and moan about the lack of service. We like service, but we just aren't willing to pay for it. This is why it is my belief, and this is only my belief, that most successful booksellers in the future will have to first be able to compete on price. Only if their prices are competitive will they then be able to capture business based on level of service or other factors.

As I noted in my comment to Lee Kirk's letter, this only applies to titles for which at least several copies are being offered for sale. If you hold the only copy of an item currently for sale, competition won't control your price. You will, with the challenge then being to find someone who wants your book enough to pay your price.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 45. A complete edition of the rare and popular <i>Mer des Histoires,</i> 1543. Est. $28000 to $35000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 64. Kircher's fascinating cross-section of the earth's interior, 1682. Est. $1600 to $1900
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 68. Geographical guide to a man's heart with obstacles "clearly marked", 1960. Est. $200 to $300
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 75. Jansson's rare carte-a-figures map of the Americas in full original color, 1645. Est. $7000 to $8500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 107. Includes famous Gallatin map and portraits of North American Indians, 1840. Est. $900 to $1100
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 231. A hot-air balloon perspective of California's famous Wine Country, 1979. Est. $150 to $180
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 236. Lovely chromolithograph of California Street in San Francisco, 1864. Est. $1000 to $1300
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 446. Rare German satirical map of World War I, 1915. Est. $1800 to $2200
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 543. Olearius' important plan of Moscow, 1647. Est. $1800 to $2200
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 660. Robert Walton's scarce, separately-issued carte-a-figures map, 1660. Est. $6000 to $7000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 702. Rare engraving of flags from "Le Neptune Francois", 1700.<br>Est. $950 to $1200
    <b>Old World Auctions (Nov 1-14):</b><br>Lot 719. Two-volume geographical grammar & dictionary with 20 maps, 1795. Est. $450 to $550
  • <center><b>David Gindy's One Of A Kind Collectibles Rare Autographs & Manuscripts Auction.<br>November 15, 2018</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> An original copy of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution “extending the right of suffrage to women.” $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> William Henry Harrison. Very rare signature as President. $7,500 to $10,000
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> 24"x32" Signed Image of Alexander Graham Bell. $7,500 to $10,000
    <center><b>David Gindy's One Of A Kind Collectibles Rare Autographs & Manuscripts Auction.<br>November 15, 2018</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> Important Appointment for Harry Woodring as Secretary of War by Franklin D. Roosevelt. $3,000 to $5,000
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> Thomas Edison original patent related to dynamos for electrical lamps. $14,000 to $18,000
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> Important 1681 Penn Land Grant to His friend Robert Turner, credited for defining the look of Philadelphia for the next 200 years. $5,000 to $7,000
    <center><b>David Gindy's One Of A Kind Collectibles Rare Autographs & Manuscripts Auction.<br>November 15, 2018</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> Act of the Second Congress relating to trade with Indians issued by George Washington and signed by Thomas Jefferson. $22,000 to $27,000
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Document signed, August 15, 1861, appointing Fabius Stanley a Commander in the Navy. $6,500 to $8,000
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> Abraham Lincoln. A fine example of the iconic George Clark ambrotype. $3,000 to $5,000
    <center><b>David Gindy's One Of A Kind Collectibles Rare Autographs & Manuscripts Auction.<br>November 15, 2018</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> Hector Berlioz. Rare autograph musical quotation signed, seven bars from the “Love Scene” of his choral symphony Romeo et Juliette. $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> McKenney & Hall. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America</i>, 1865, Three Volumes. $3,000 to $5,000
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Nov. 15:</b> Rare Honore de Balzac handwritten and signed letter bound in book. $3,000 to $5,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Maria Louise Kirk, 4 pen, ink, watercolor & gouache illustrations for <i>Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,</i> 1904. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> H.A. Rey, <i>“Do You Want To Get Across?”</i> colored pencil, charcoal & watercolor, 1939. $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Norman Rockwell, <i>The Pharmacist,</i> study for cover of <i>The Saturday Evening Post,</i> 1939. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Sir William Russell Flint, illustration for Homer’s <i>Odyssey,</i> gouache & watercolor, 1914. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Ludwig Bemelmans, <i>“And everyone was in his bed,"</i> gouache, watercolor & ink on board, 1961. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Charles M. Shulz, <i>Woodstock is Searching for His Identity,</i> original pen & ink 4-panel <i>Peanuts</i> comic strip, 1972. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Eric Carle, <i>The Very Hungry Caterpillar,</i> painted collage, 1990. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Jerry Pinkney, <i>The Lion & The Mouse,</i> watercolor & graphite, illustration for <i>School Library Journal,</i> 2009. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Maurice Sendak, watercolor & graphite illustration for <i>Little Bear's New Friend,</i> 2001. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Peter Arno, <i>Circus Tricks,</i> ink, wash & watercolor, cover illustration for <i>The New Yorker,</i> 1964. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Garry Trudeau, Doonesbury: <i>“Is Rufus Ready for his Lesson?”,</i> watercolor, pen & ink, circa 1970s. $6,000 to $9,000.
  • <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>The first edition, in the original wrappers, of the first part of Pushkin’s masterpiece – ‘a bibliographical rarity of the highest order’ (Smirnov-Sokol’skii). £25,000 to £35,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>The very rare first edition of Gogol’s first masterpiece and his first obtainable book. £50,000 to £70,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>The first edition of Dostoevsky's <i>Brat'ia Karamazovy</i> (1830) in a superb contemporary cloth presentation binding. £22,000 to £30,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>The first edition of the first version of the opening of <i>War and Peace,</i> with the original paper covers. £15,000 to £20,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>An early corrected typescript of Akhmatova's <i>Poema bez geroia</i> (July 1946) £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>A presentation copy of the first edition of <i>Kamen</i> (1913) inscribed by Mandel'shtam to his early mentor the poet Viacheslav Ivanov. £60,000 to £90,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>Rare autograph correspondence from Vladislav Khodasevich, including a manuscript of his long poem 'Sorrento Photographs' (1921). £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>An important letter from Marina Tsvetaeva to the poet Nikolai Tikhonov (1935) in which she challenges Pasternak and his views on poetry. £12,000 to £18,000
  • <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on November 26th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>H. Schedel, <i>Buch der Chroniken,</i> 1493. Est: € 120,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b> Latin and Book of Hours, around 1500. Est: € 50,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b> Biblia latina, Koberger printing 1493. Est: € 4,000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on November 26th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>P. de Medina, <i>Libro de grandezas,</i> 1549. Est: € 6,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>C. J. Trew, <i>Plantae selectae,</i> 1750-73. Est: € 28,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>A. de Laborde, <i>Voyage pittoresque,</i> 1806-20. Est: € 8,000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on November 26th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>G. Klimt, <i>Eine Nachlese,</i> 1931.<br>Est: € 10,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>W. Kandinsky, <i>Klänge,</i> 1913.<br>Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>F. Léger, <i>Les illuminations,</i> 1949.<br>Est: € 2,000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on November 26th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b> Master binding by E. Maylander, 1945. Est: € 1,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b> Master binding by G. Cretté, 1934. Est: € 6,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>S. Dalí, <i>Après 50 ans des surréalisme,</i> 1974. Est: € 8,000
  • <b>Christie’s Paris, Nov 20:</b> GAZA, Theodorus. <i>Introductivae grammatices libriquatuor.</i> Venice: Aldus Manutius, 25 December 1495. €40,000 to 50,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, Nov 20:</b> MACHIAVELLI, Niccolo. <i>Historie di Nicolo Machiavegli cittadino, et segretario fiorentino</i>... Rome: Antonio Blado, 25 March 1532. €15,000 to 20,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, Nov 20:</b> BELLMER, Hans -- ELUARD, Paul. <i>Les Jeux de la Poupée. Illustrés de textes par Paul Eluard.</i> Paris : les Editions Premieres, 1949. €30,000 to 40,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, Nov 20:</b> [BONNARD, Pierre] - VERLAINE, Paul. <i>Parallèlement.</i> Paris : Imprimerie nationale & Ambroise Vollard, 1900. €30,000 to 40,000
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. November 29, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Buffon (G.L.M.L., Comte de). <i>Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux,</i> 10 vol., large paper copy, 973 hand-coloured engraved plates drawn and engraved by Franz Nicolaus Martinet, Paris, 1770-86. £70,000 to 90,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Bible (English). The Holy Bible, first edition of the King James Bible, the Great 'He' Bible, [Robert Barker], 1611. £30,000 to 40,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Marlborough (John Churchill, 1st Duke of).- [Parker (Robert, army officer)] <i>[Memoirs of the remarkable military transactions from the year 1688 to 1718],</i> ?autograph manuscript, 300pp., [c. 1718]. £20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. November 29, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> France.- Paris.- Turgot (Michel Etienne). <i>Plan de Paris,</i> engraved maps, contemporary red morocco, gilt, Paris, 1739. £10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Mongolia.- Pallas (Peter Simon). <i>Sammlungen Historischer Nachrichten uber die Mongolischen Volkerschaften,</i> first edition, complete with 31 plates, St. Petersburg, 1776-1801. £10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Brant (Sebastian). <i>Stultifera Navis... The Ship of Fooles, wherein is shewed the folly of all States...,</i> large woodcut title and numerous woodcuts in the text, [London], [John Cawood], 1570. £8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. November 29, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Aldus.- Boccaccio (Giovanni). <i>Il Decamerone,</i> Venice, House of Aldus & Andrea Torresani, 1522. £8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Wallace (Alfred Russel). 77pp. of Autograph letters (and 1 postcard) to various people, 1894-1904, on various palaeontological, geological and natural history matters. £8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> DNA.- Watson (James D.) and Francis Crick, <i>Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid,</i> 1953 [and others]. £5,000 to 7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. November 29, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Optics.- Molyneux (William). <i>Dioptrica nova. A Treatise of Dioptricks, in Two Parts,</i> first edition, for Benj. Tooke, 1692. £5,000 to 7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Economics.- Mississippi & South Sea Bubbles.- <i>Het Groote Tafereel der Dwaasheid,</i> 74 engraved plates and 3 maps, Amsterdam, 1720. £4,000 to 6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Asia.- Clouet (Jean Baptiste Louis). <i>Carte D'Asie Divisée en ses Principaux Etats,</i> engraved map with hand-colouring, on wooden rollers, 1782. £3,000 to 5,000
  • <center><b>Bonhams New York: December 5<br> Fine Books and Manuscripts Including the World of Hilary Knight [and] History of Science and Technology, Including Space History<br><br>Bonhams Online: Fine Books and Manuscripts, December 6-13</b>
    <b>Bonhams:</b> KNIGHT, HILARY. The Original Portrait of Eloise that Hung at the Plaza Hotel. $100,000 to 150,000
    <b>Bonhams:</b> WARHOL, ANDY. "Iced Lemon Delight," an Original Watercolor Presented to Hilary Knight's cat, Phoebe $8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Bonhams:</b> SENDAK, MAURICE. <i>Where the Wild Things Are.</i> PRESENTATION COPY, INSCRIBED with drawing to Hilary Knight in the month following publication. $10,000 to 15,000
    <center><b>Bonhams New York: December 5<br> Fine Books and Manuscripts Including the World of Hilary Knight [and] History of Science and Technology, Including Space History<br><br>Bonhams Online: Fine Books and Manuscripts, December 6-13</b>
    <b>Bonhams:</b> NOLAND, KENNETH. Original circle painting, untitled, acrylic and ink on cloth, for cover of monograph $8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Bonhams:</b> TOULOUSE-LAUTREC. <i>Histoires Naturelles,</i> 1899. With 22 original lithographs. $10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Bonhams:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>A Collection of Poems,</i> [1711]. The first authoritative and complete collected Sonnets.$15,000 to 20,000
    <center><b>Bonhams New York: December 5<br> Fine Books and Manuscripts Including the World of Hilary Knight [and] History of Science and Technology, Including Space History<br><br>Bonhams Online: Fine Books and Manuscripts, December 6-13</b>
    <b>Bonhams:</b> LONDON, JACK. <i>The Call of the Wild.</i> 1903. First edition, first state jacket. $2,000 to 3,000
    <b>Bonhams:</b> FROST, ROBERT. Autograph Manuscript of "Build Soil," 12 pp, 1932-1936. $15,000 to 20,000
    <b>Bonhams:</b> GOULD, GLENN. Glenn Gould's extensively annotated copy of Bach's Goldberg Variations $100,000 to 150,000
    <center><b>Bonhams New York: December 5<br> Fine Books and Manuscripts Including the World of Hilary Knight [and] History of Science and Technology, Including Space History<br><br>Bonhams Online: Fine Books and Manuscripts, December 6-13</b>
    <b>Bonhams:</b> PLATH, SYLVIA. EARLY Autograph Letter Signed, about her beginnings as a writer, Northampton, MA, 1951. $7,000 to 10,000
    <b>Bonhams:</b> HOUDINI, HARRY. A collection of 11 cast iron shackle and lock items from Houdini's personal collection. $20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Bonhams:</b> M4 ENGIMA MACHINE, with very rare RARE HYDRA KEY ENVELOPE. $400,000 to 600,000

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