• <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CURTIS, EDWARD. <i>Original glass plate photograph, Honovi – Walpi Snake Priest, prepared by Curtis for the printing of The North American Indian</i>, c.1910
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN WEST.), Watkins, Taber, Savage, and others. <i>Magnificent Album of Mammoth Photographs of the American West, with other subjects various</i>, ca. 1865-1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Darwin Family Photograph Album</i>. Down, Kent, 1871-1879
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (SECRET SERVICE). <i>The photographic archive, papers, and relics of William Kennoch, Secret Service Agent</i>. Various places, 1870s and 1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN REVOLUTION). <i>Daguerreotype Portrait of Baltus Stone, the earliest photo of a Revolution veteran,</i> 1846
  • <b>Jasper52: Ernest Hemingway Book Auction. Now through December 3rd</b>
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Ernest Hemingway, <i>The Torrents of Spring</i>, First Edition. $500-800
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Edward O’Brien, <i>The Best Short Stories of 1923</i>, Signed. $600-800
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Ernest Hemingway, <i>A Farewell To Arms</i>, First Edition. $800-1000
    <b>Jasper52: Ernest Hemingway Book Auction. Now through December 3rd</b>
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>20 Exclusive Collectors Edition Hemingway Books. $1000-1500
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Helen Wentworth, <i>Sunnyside Children</i>, Signed. $1500-2500
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Ernest Hemingway’s personal Basic Field Manual, Signed. $8000-12,000
    <b>Jasper52: Ernest Hemingway Book Auction. Now through December 3rd</b>
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Three Books by Hemingway: <i>The Sun Also Rises</i> (1953), <i>Men Without Women</i> (1927), <i>A Farewell to Arms</i> (1929). $50-150
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Ernest Hemingway, <i>Green Hills Of Africa</i>, First Edition. $300-500
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Ernest Hemingway, <i>The Sun Also Rises</i>, First Edition. $300-500
    <b>Jasper52: Ernest Hemingway Book Auction. Now through December 3rd</b>
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Ernest Hemingway, <i>The Old Man & Sea</i>, First Club Edition. $15-30
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Scribner’s Magazine 50th Anniversary 1887-1937. $15-30
    <b>Jasper52, now thru Dec. 3:</b><br>Ernest Hemingway, <i>A Moveable Feast</i>, First English Edition. $30-50
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Laurie & Whittle, <i>The Complete East-India Pilot</i>, with 113 maps, London, 1797. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> George W. Browning, 134 sketches of natural history & landscape subjects, American West, 1880s-90s.<br>$4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Catesby & Ehret, <i>Magnolia Grandiflora</i>, from first edition <i>Natural History of Carolina</i>, London, 1731-43. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Petrus Plancius, <i>The Spice Map</i>, hand-colored, London, 1598.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John Miller, <i>Illustratio Systematis Sexualis Linnaei</i>, London, 1770-77. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Thomas Shotter Boys, <i>Original Views of London As It Is</i>, de luxe issue, 26 hand-colored lithographs, London, 1842. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Frederick de Wit, <i>Belgi XVII Provinciarum Tabula</i>, true first state wall map, Amsterdam, ca 1670. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John James Audubon, <i>Passenger Pigeon, Plate LXII</i>, aquatint & engraving before color, London, 1829. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Joannes Clericus, <i>Atlas Atiquus, Sacer, Ecclesiasticus et Profanus</i>, Amsterdam, 1705. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Matthaus Seutter, <i>Atlas Novus sive Tabulae Geographicae totius Orbis</i>, Augsburg, ca 1735.<br>$10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> William Roscoe, <i>Monandrian Plants of the Order Scitamineae</i>, Liverpool, 1824-28. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John James Audubon, <i>The Mocking Bird</i>, hand-colored aquatint & engraving, London, 1827.<br>$7,000 to $10,000.
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1863. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.

Rare Book Monthly

New Letter

Letters to the Editor

. July 01, 2011

Ref: Article: Google Books Hearing Postponed



The statement in paragraph two, "It was, rather, a case of it being virtually impossible to locate copyright holders of long out of print books, many of whom are long dead, and the inheritors of these rights unknown and even harder to find" isn't exactly correct. My reference book was published in 1991 and I owned the copyright.



One day while using Google Online Books, I decided to see if my book would be mentioned. Not only was it mentioned but I was able to download up to 50 pages. I then closed the site and went back and was able to download another 50 pages and I was able to continue to do so until I had downloaded the entire 942 pages all for free. The book was selling for $235 at the time. The book is still in print after 19.5 years and now cost $295. My Royalty is 12%.



Back to Google. I wrote Google about this problem with no response. I wrote my publisher and finally the pages were removed. I did not give them permission to put it on their site.



My book was not what they called "long out of print" for it was still in print and fell under the copyright laws. I believe I am still alive and still living in my same home now for 27 years. Google NEVER attempted to locate me. All they needed to do was to put my name "William J. Chamberlin" into their web browser and they would have easily found me.



Now I am having problems with Amazon.com. Naturally they do sell my book. Early this year, I found that they are also selling a Kindle version for over $200. They did not request permission from me to do so. I have not rec'd any royalties from any sales. I wrote them asking them who gave permission to make a Kindle format copy to sell. Their response was to give me the name and address for their lawyer.



So now, we have another company abusing authors.



I don't know what to do about this. Maybe someone who has experience this call help me.



William J. Chamberlin



 billchamberlin@biblemuseum.org

248-942-2078


Giordano June 04, 2011

Hello,

Odd to read Karen Wright's article on 'Booking it in Europe' where she talks of the Shakespeare and Company bookshop having been started in 1951 by George Whitman.

It was, in fact, opened in 1919 by Sylvia Beach, born in Baltimore,who had arrived in France in 1902 as a fifteen-year-old girl. In the coming months and years, through the shop's doors came, amongst other literary greats, James Joyce, F. Scott Fitgerald and Ernest Hemingway, all of whom regarded it almost as a home from home.

It was Sylvia Beach, of course, who published Joyce's 'Ulysses' in 1922 and sold it from the shop. I don't think Whitman ever could have matched that and, as far as I know, he simply traded on the fame of the original name.

There is a fascinating book by Noel Riley Fitch called 'Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation: a history of literary Paris in the Twenties and Thirties' (first published by Norton, 1983). Well worth reading.


. April 04, 2011

Bruce:




I just read your piece about the New York constitution. Sadly this is one of the by-products of a marketplace with no responsibility such as eBay. A dealer or even reputable auction house would never have offered such a thing, and would be vilified if they did.



 My purchase of the other 1777 New York constitution illustrates the randomness of auctions. They are not only what happens that place and day, but that moment. Despite the transparency the Internet has made possible, this is still a very imperfect world; there are literally millions of books, each with their own small community of interest. Potential buyers may miss the sale, or have just spent a lot of money on something else, or have shifted their interests. If anything, the whole story illustrates how professionals can add value by vetting material, describing it correctly, and being willing to hold it until the right buyer comes along.



 Best,



 Bill


HOPEFULL? March 01, 2011

BEEN WITH YOU A DOZEN YEARS..SUBSCRIBER UNTIL RETIREMENT..SO..whats happened to your pages?
I click on READ MORE..and get an empty line asking for comment..on what? You've not let me read it!
well,





We are looking at it some more. This has not happened to many people, so it appears perhaps some combination of operating system and/or browser may be causing a problem. If others are having this problem please let us know - Editor.


bookfever February 01, 2011

I enjoyed Susan Halas's article on bookselling, although I have a tendency to agree with Bruce that auction records can constitute a "reality check" in terms of valuing books.

Shortly after reading this article, I was researching a juvenile series I came across this blog (on the seriesbooks.com website) and just had to laugh

"Some people feel that it is their duty to tell every seller of a first printing copy of Nancy Drew #1 The Secret of the Old Clock that the book is valued at $1,000—regardless of the condition of the book up for sale. . . .

I seem to recall that a 1930A-1 Old Clock without a jacket sold in the summer of 2008 for around $1,000, but that was to the woman who was spending around $30,000 per month on series books that summer. She worked for a bank and had stolen $300,000 from her bank's vault. She later went to federal prison. That sale does not count because that buyer tended to pay around 10 times the actual value of books during that buying frenzy. People bid against her just to drive the prices up, and I know of at least one instance in which a seller shilled an auction in order to make her pay an extreme amount."

So I guess the bottom line is that no matter which you check out - current listed prices or auction records - you still need to use your expertise to determine the price you want to place on a book (or pay for it.)

Chris Volk
bookfever.com


. November 23, 2010

Michael Stillman re Library Privatization

I don't know when you published it, but I just saw the above re the Santa Clarita Library lawsuits. One of the best explanations of the issues and suits I've seen.

Don Ricketts


. November 01, 2010

re: Santa Clarita Library

I understand that several libraries of the Ventura County System --where I live--are also joining or considering joining LSSI. It does seem clearly to be an issue of pensions and union negotiated salaries. With so much bad press about pensions in California (I am a retired librarian and soon to be retired bookseller) in the news this year, it is no wonder that this has again raised it's ugly head.
Thanks for making this issue more widely available to the booksellers of the nation.


. November 01, 2010

re: Better World Books

Hello,

I read with interest your article on Better World Books, an
organization which holds itself forth as some sort of "humanitarian" and
"green" organization. The author of this article implied that if we as
book dealers were as smart as they, we could also be successful. Most
book dealers, myself included, think it is unethical to put up big green
boxes that say "donate books, do good" when indeed you are a for profit
corporation. This is the worst form of greenwashing. If they were
capable of shame, I would say "shame on them". Your article only helped
to legitimize this fraud.


Mark Holmen - Bookmark


Editor's Note: The writer carefully noted that partners receive only a "portion of revenues generated by donated books," and the donations produce "a decent amount of revenue for the corporation." This is a for-profit business that does some good deeds on the side and we were certainly not attempting to hide that fact.


. October 01, 2010

Your excellent newsletter

Fascinating. The only email re the trade I pay attention to.

Best,
Gary


. September 03, 2010

re: Dealer Catalogue Listings

I think this unbelievably ambitious project will do much to add meat
to the bones of your data-base. I do not sell 'great books' but I do
sell some 'good' books and I am frequently unable to find them in your
DB even as comprehensive as you are.
It seems that most of these are earlier works that may not have come to
auction in the last 50-100 years. Some are victims of the search
engine.


With that said, I have a hard time imagining surviving without your resources.
Your listings of Sabin et al. has been of an immeasurable help to me.
Maggs type descriptions are extremely useful to any antiquarian dealer.

Sincerely yours,

Kenny Parolini


. September 01, 2010

Thoughts on Adding Dealer Catalogues to the AED

I am a long-time collector of Western Americana with emphasis on
Californiana, with a particular concentration on the Gold Rush Period.
As a Research Member of the Americana Exchange, I am a very frequent
user of your database which I find to be a truly wonderful resource
for the advanced collector. Although I have a large collection
of my own of several hundred Americana catalogues dating back to the
19th century, no single collector or dealer could ever amass what you
have made so readily accessible.

As far as the letters "A" and "B" are concerned, in my areas of
interest I would encourage you to consider more of the 1915-1930
auction catalogues of the American Art Association /Anderson
Galleries, which are a wonderful resource on rare Western Americana.
Also, additional catalogues from Alta California Books would be a fine
addition.

Further along in the alphabet, additional catalogues of Holmes Book
Company (Oakland), Talisman Press (Georgetown), John Howell Books (San
Francisco), and Dawson's Book Shop (Los Angeles) would also be great
additions.

Among the major dealers further east, if the firms are willing to
permit their inclusion the marvelous catalogues of William Reese
Company (New Haven) and Michael Heaston (Austin) would be truly
wonderful additions. As I don't recall having seen any of their
catalogs referenced in the database, I suspect they may be unwilling
to permit their inclusion. If that is the case, I hope this will some
day change.

William J. Coffill (Sonora, CA)


. September 01, 2010

Thoughts on Adding Dealer Catalogues to the AED

Dawsons Book Shop of Los Angeles.... Book catalogs since 1905. Best
collection of Californiana & Western Americana.

Catalogs are available.

denny kruska


prints August 02, 2010

RE: Too Good to Be True

Bruce,


Although you didn't mention it, I would state the obvious, that the Ebay seller appears to actually have committed an insurance fraud against the US Postal Service. Obviously knowing that the piece was a reproduction, what better way to guarantee they get their selling price of $275 other than by packing the piece to ensure breakage during transit? You get your purchase price back from Ebay because the item was a fake, AND the seller gets to keep the $275 insurance claim paid by the Post Office because the piece was damaged in transit. A great way to "launder" reproductions by the unscrupulous seller and to leave the USPS holding the bag...


Mike August 01, 2010

Dear Mr. McKinney,

Your article about the book consigned to Jeff Thomas illustrates one of the problems that can arise when books are consigned.

A more frequent problem, in the antique trade--but also the book trade, is the permanent loss of consigned items in a dealer bankruptcy IF the very exact procedures of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) are not followed.

Consigned books may also be permanently lost, or spend years in limbo, should the IRS seize a dealer's business.

It would be helpful, for both dealers and collectors, if the exact requirements of the UCC--as they pertain to consigned items--were discussed in a future article.


. August 01, 2010

Dear Mr. McKinney:

I read with great interest your "Too Good to be True" column on your experience with acquiring a refund from Ebay on a purchase you found -not- to be a Currier & Ives lithograph.

For your information, Currier & Ives actually sold chromist-made reproductions, -not- lithographs. This link to my monograph documents that fact: click here.

Any questions or comments, please contact me.

Respectfully,

Gary Arseneau

artist, creator of original lithographs, scholar & author

P.O. Box 686
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32035

(904) 277-3721

gwarseneau@hotmail.com (email)

garyarseneau.blogspot.com (blog)

garyarseneau.com (website)


. August 01, 2010

Nice job. As always I look forward to receiving your AE monthly.



Best regards,

John M. Martello

shigitatsu.com


wellesley5 July 03, 2010

Bruce McKinney's article on Bolerium is the most literate/literary description of a bookshop that I have ever read. The entire website is a source of invaluable information and is a "must read" on the first of every month.


Friend July 01, 2010

Hello:


Jeff Weber makes very critical points about Amazon [see letter below]. The current issue, while interesting, is unenforceable and impractical. Amazon isn't going to waste energy trying to police the millions of individuals listing items for sale on its site and others. However, the points raised by Mr. Weber have a greater financial impact overall on the Amazon retailers. The postage rates are unreasonable. Yet some Amazon retailers make their profit on the postage since a paperback can generally be sent for about $1.00. The putative "price" merely covers the listing fee. Yet here is the dilemma - Amazon's internet prominence outperforms all the others by miles. Consumers start and generally finish at Amazon - not AbeBooks, Biblio or [fill in the blank]. It's about on-line traffic and the other sites - despite being specialized - just don't drive the market. And moribund ebay essentially turned the wrong way (under Meg Whitman) and allowed Amazon to dominate the space. So forget the mirage of the European contretemps and find a way to get the good folks at Amazon to solve the very real concerns expressed by Mr. Weber.


. July 01, 2010

AE monthly on Amazon pricing

Dear Mr. Stillman:

Your article was of considerable interest. I suspect that the
instances where Amazon may actually look for evidence of unbalanced retailing are
few. Instead they may be simply using verbiage to make people think this is their
policy - and it is a good policy to have representing their company. But in practice
it would be impossible for them to actually watch the prices of every book from
every bookseller in all the web-sites dealer's use.

But the issues for me are even deeper: Amazon does not act in any way to protect
either the consumer or the bookseller - thus falling well short of the usual
business practices that all dealers know are necessary - primarily guaranteeing your
product. Amazon does not. For example: in the US Amazon refuses to collect sales tax
which is due for every book shipped within the state you operate in. For me this is
California. Therefore Amazon leaves every bookseller exposed to the wrath of the IRS
and auditors in the issue of tax collection. In addition their standard rate
shipping policy is ridiculous: they offer $3.99 for shipping anything, be it a
paperback or a $10,000 book or a 50 volume set. There are no exceptions. No dealer
will comply to this stringent system, but they must work within it because that is
all that is offered. I am constantly interacting with the Amazon client asking for
more shipping, especially for international orders. Amazon's reimbursement of $12.49
for overseas shipping is even under what the global rate envelope charges are at
$12.80. To add: there is never any room for insurance. In fact this angers some
customers who feel that the set shipping rates of Amazon are what is entirely fair
on their part. However the reverse is true: the shipping rates must be allowed to
vary in accordance with the appropriate charges and insurance for any type of order.
Amazon will also not back up and pay for an item that a customer does not receive.
Who is liable for a loss? You can be sure it is not Amazon. They are the middleman
collecting a percentage - they are not interested in paying for lost merchandise.
So, let the buyer beware - but in this case all buyers on Amazon are not aware. If
they knew that some books were sold on Amazon at a loss to the retailer, would these
same clients understand the abuse the dealer is undertaking from Amazon? Probably
not for now. The Amazon commission is partly a sliding scale - I do not know the
specific of it, but if a book is cheap enough, say $1 to list, their discount is
MORE than $1. Thus they actually force the dealer to sell items at less than $0.00
to get an item out the door.

I have not addressed specifically the issues of price fixing, but Amazon seems to do
nothing in the US that I know about that enforces their policy. And at the same
time, based on the tax collecting issue, Amazon seems to be strong enough to stand
up to the federal government and not become a tax collector. I believe (though I can
not prove it), that California raised its sales tax last year from 8.5% to 9.75% to
make up for the difference in internet sales that they can not regulate. Thus Amazon
is not the only one to blame - but they are a key contributor.

I invite your interaction.

Jeff Weber


IslandSF June 04, 2010

Stillman asks: "Will newsmen be replaced with bloggers, long on opinion, short on facts?"

Ironic, because that is just what he does.

It is easy to consume a meal that is short of nutrients if you are unfamiliar with a truly nutritious repast; thus many can become used to a constant diet of 'blogging' and take it for real information.

It is easy to have someone else interpret the facts for you, but talented analysts usually get jobs for real publications and don't just write for free for their own companies or websites. Perhaps that is why the Wall Street Journal increased its readership and why tens of thousands of "blogs" are left moldering, to clutter up the internet.


. June 01, 2010

Mr. Stillman,

That was an utterly fantastic piece about the Los Angeles book "dealer" case. Thanks
so much for bringing it to our attention.

Best,

Travis


. June 01, 2010

re: eBay sniping

Tom McKinney,

I have been working with eBay as either a seller or bidder for many years, since 1998 in fact. I have seen their system go through great growth and the sad decline that is presently underway as they make policies and pricing changes to drive away the individual sellers which tend to have the most interesting items on average.

After losing some unique items which were important to us because we overslept the auction close, we decided to stop revolving our life activities to when we could be next to the computer and bid on an auction. The eBay policy of a fixed close time changes the successful strategies for bidding. It makes no difference who is the highest a day, an hour, or a minute before the close. Only the high bidder at the end counts. Hence sniping becomes the tool of choice for people who want to win more auctions and generally pay less for each item won.

I would not, however, use a local program. This would require that your computer be synchronized with the eBay clocks (not merely Apple system time) and that there be a fast connection and an awake computer at all times when you'd be placing an automated bid. For this we found that web site services were a better choice. We initially used AuctionStealer.com but left them when we lost a couple auctions due to service outages.

We now use eSnipe.com and have for many years with satisfaction. There is a fee for using these services based on how much you use it. With eSnipe you buy points for a fairly nominal sum.

There is a tool which can be installed on Firefox so that any eBay auction item page has an eSnipe window to log in and bid.

Of course these systems need to have your eBay user and password so don't use the same ones on eBay that you use for other important things like PayPal, your bank, email, etc.

I also have the eBay app on my iPhone to check in on auctions during the day but not to bid.

Keep in mind that eBay has bid increments so it is necessary to place a bid high enough to exceed this. Hence, if an auction starts at 19.99 and you bid 20.10, unless your bid is the first, you won't have a chance because the increment above 19.99 is higher than 11 cents.

The eSnipe default is 6 seconds before the auction. Although tempted, I have not felt compelled to reduce this to 5 or 4 seconds. The shorter the time, the more chance that the bid may fail.

In general, it's not so much an issue of who bid closest to the close but rather who has placed the highest top bid who wins. It just seems like the former situation when you are starting out.

Don't place a bid with an even amount ending in .00 or .50. Use something odd, especially between .50 and .99, to give yourself a minimal edge in bidding.

The eBay system, with all of its problems, still yields many items which are findable nowhere else. A great number of the prizes in my collection come from there. I make extensive use of the 100 saved searches they give each account though that is a topic for another day should you be interested.

James D. Keeline

San Diego, CA


. May 05, 2010

re: Portland Book Store Fire

Hello Fellow Booksellers,



I have looked into what we can do to help Phil, following the fire which totally destroyed Great Northwest Bookstore. The cost of cleanup alone will be in the tens of thousands of dollars. That means money is what is most needed. A fund has already been established with On Point Credit Union. I have discussed this with the other officers and we decided that PAUBA should donate $300. In addition, I encourage individuals to contribute what they can.



You can contribute in person at any On Point Credit Union or you can use your electronic payment systems. The account number is 1005903 and the address is P.O. Box 3750, Ptld, OR 97208.



I'll let you know if I hear of anything else we can do to help.



Best,

Debbie Cross



Wrigley-Cross Books

PMB 455

2870 N.E. Hogan Road Suite E

Gresham OR 97030-3175

Phone: (503) 667-0807

Toll Free: (877) 694-1467

http://www.wrigleycrossbooks.com


. May 03, 2010

Dear Bruce:



In your AE article about the New York Book Fair you referred to ILAB as the ABAA's European equivalent. Technically this is incorrect, ILAB (International League of Antiquarian Booksellers) is a world umbrella organization, of which both ABAA and over 20 other national associations (ABA in the UK, SLAM in France, and so forth) are members.



Best,



Tom Congalton


Editor's note: Thank you for the head's up. The International League of Antiquarian Booksellers is an organization whose membership consists of 22 national bookseller groups from all over the world. The individual booksellers who are members of each of these national organizations are thereby members of ILAB too. More can be learned about this organization and its services on the ILAB website: www.ilab.org.


Grum April 07, 2010

Many dealers regularly visiting the UK will know of Quintos/Francis Edwards shop in London's Charing Cross Road - the Quintos monthly restock (1st Tuesday of the month) has been the source of many a bargain. In case your heart sinks to see it no longer alongisde Leicester Square tube station, fear not. It has moved further up Charing Cross Road to #72 - which in some ways is actually better than the former site. Quintos' stock is in the large basement. Just thought you all might like to know.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>Die Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie.</i> Leipzig: Johann Ambrosius Barth, 1916.<br>$80,000 – 120,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in English, Signed Integrally ("Isaac Newton"). $50,000 – 70,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life</i>. London: John Murray, 1859. $25,000 – 35,000
    <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.</i> London: Benjamin Motte, 1729.<br>$20,000 – 30,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEISENBERG, WERNER. Autograph Manuscript entitled "<i>Entwicklung der Theorie der Elementarteilche,</i>” [1964].<br>$15,000 – 25,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> BERNOULLI, DANIEL. <i>Hydrodynamica, sive De viribus et motibus fluidorum commentarii.</i> Strasbourg: Johann Heinrich Decker for Johann Reinhold Dulsecker, 1738. $5,000 – 7,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> [TARKOVSKY, ANDREI ARSENIEVICH.] STRUGATSKY, BORIS AND ARKADY. Typed Manuscript for <i>Stalker</i>, being the director's working script, 1977. $150,000 – 200,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. Typed Manuscript of "Marlin Off the Morro: A Cuban Letter," n.p., [1933]. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> SALINGER, JEROME DAVID. 4 Autograph Letters, 2 of which Signed ("Jerry") and 6 Typed Letters, 2 of which Initialed ("J"). $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> PASTERNAK, BORIS LEONIDOVICH. Typed Manuscript Carbon, "Doktor Zhivago," with some typed corrections, Moscow, 1948. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> MILNE, ALAN ALEXANDER. Autograph Manuscript Signed 3 times ("A.A. Milne"), entitled "Peace with Honour: An Enquiry into the War Convention," 1934.<br>$30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> FROST, ROBERT. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("Robert Frost"), titled "Gold for Christmas," 1952. $15,000 – 20,000
  • <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [ARTILLERY]. KITCHEN, D.C. <i>Record of the Wyoming Artillerists.</I> Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania: Alvin Day Printer, 1874. $2,000-4,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> UNITED STATES AND MEXICAN BOUNDARY COMMISSION. EMORY, William Hemsley. <i>Report of the United States and Mexican Boundary Survey, Made under the Direction of the Secretary of the Interior…</i><br>$3,000-6,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> RICHARDSON, William H. <i>Journal of William H. Richardson, a Private Soldier in the Campaign of New and Old Mexico…</i>. Baltimore: John H. Woods, 1848. $3,000-6,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> GARCÍA CONDE, Pedro. <i>Carta geografica general de la Republica Mexicana…</i> $30,000-60,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> EMORY, William Hemsley. <i>Map of Texas and the Countries Adjacent: Compiled in the Bureau of the Corps of Topographical Engineers; From the Best Authorities…</i> [Washington, 1844]. $7,500-15,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> THORPE, Thomas Bangs. <i>Our Army at Monterey. Being a Correct Account of the Proceedings and Events which Occurred to the “Army of Occupation”…</i> Philadelphia, 1847. $400-800
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> <i>The Rough and Ready Songster: Embellished with Twenty-Five Splendid Engravings, Illustrative of the American Victories in Mexico…</i> New York; St. Louis, Mo [ca. 1848].<br>$500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> CURRIER, Nathaniel (publisher). <i>The Brilliant Charge of Capt. May At the Battle of Resaca de la Palma (Palm Ravine) 9th of May…</i> $150-300 
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [RINGGOLD, SAMUEL]. WYNNE, James. <i>Memoir of Major Samuel Ringgold, United States Army: Read Before the Maryland Historical Society, April 1st, 1847.</i> Baltimore, 1847. $500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [TAYLOR, ZACHARY]. <i>Life of General Taylor from the Best Authorities.</i> New York: Nafis and Cornish; St. Louis, Mo.: Nafis, Cornish & Co., 1847.<br>$500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> TILDEN, Bryant Parrott, Jr. <i>Notes on the Upper Rio Grande, Explored in the Months of October and November, 1846, on Board the U.S. Steamer Major Brown…</i> Philadelphia, 1847.<br>$5,000-10,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [WORTH, WILLIAM J.]. <i>Life of General Worth; To Which is Added a Sketch of the Life of Brigadier-General Wool.</i> New York: Nafis & Cornish; St. Louis, Mo.: Nafis, Cornish & Co., 1847.<br>$200-400
  • <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Excessively Rare Benjamin Franklin Imprint. Estaugh (John). <i>A Call to the Unfaithful Professors of Truth</i>, Philadelphia: Printed by B. Franklin, 1744. €7,000 – 10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Original Signed Volume from the Dean Swift's Library. [Swift (Dr. Jonathan)] Grotius (Hugo). <i>De Jure Belli ac Pacis Libri Tres</i>, Amsterdam: (J. Blaeu) 1670. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Cresswell (Samuel Gurney). <i>A Series of Eight Sketches in Colour; together with a Coloured Map of the Route</i>, London: (Day & Son) July 25, 1854.<br>€15,000 – 20,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Of Legendary Rarity - First Printing of Shakespeare Outside England. Shakespeare (Wm.). <i>The Works of Shakespeare</i> In Eight Volumes. Dublin: 1726.<br>€7,000 – 10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Lewin (W.). <i>The Birds of Great Britain</i>, 8 vols in 4, with 335 hand-coloured plates, 1795 – 1801. €1,500 – 2,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> 18th Century Manuscript Relating to Massachusetts Bay, c. 1750.<br>€350 – 500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Alexander (Wm.). <i>Picturesque Representations of The Dress and Manners of the Chinese</i>, with 50 hand-coloured plates, 1814. €600 – 800
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Manuscript Estate Atlas - Neville (Arthur Richard). <i>The Estate of Sir John Coghill Bart</i>, 1791. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Unique Collection of Ballads by Brendan Behan Behan. €3,000 – 4,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Original Manuscript of Edith Somerville's Unpublished Children's Book. Somerville (Edith). <i>GROWLY-WOWLY. Or, The Story of the Three Little Pigs</i>. €3,500 – 5,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Full Set of Cuala Press Broadsides with fine hand-coloured illustrations by Jack B. Yeats, 1908 – 1915. €4,000 – 6,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Eyzinger (Michael). <i>Ad Leonis Belgici Topographicam atque Historicam Descriptionem</i>, [Cologne:] 1586. €3,000 – 4,000
  • <b>Neal Auction Company: Louisiana Purchase Auction.<br>December 2 – 4, 2016</b>
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> Collot, George Henri Victor (French, 1750-1805). "A General Map of the River Ohio, From its source to its mounth” [sic]. $4000 – 6000
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> Empire Brass Copernican Armillary Sphere, early 19th c., bands engraved in French, showing the signs of the Zodiac, solstice and equinox. $3000 – 5000
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> The Exceptionally Important Jordan Noble Infantry Snare Drum, early 19th c., label inscribed in ink "JB Noble" and engraved "Klemm & Brother's / Piano Forte & Music Warehouse”. $200,000 – 250,000
    <b>Neal Auction Company: Louisiana Purchase Auction.<br>December 2 – 4, 2016</b>
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> Confederate First National Flag, c. 1861, silk, double sided stars made from sequins and buillon.<br>$3000 – 5000
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> Attributed to James Guy Evans (American/New Orleans, 1809-c. 1859, act. 1835-1859), "U.S. Treasury Schooner <i>Whig</i>", 1848, oil on canvas. $35,000 – 45,000
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> Thomas Jefferson and James Madison Signed Ship's Passport, dated June 12, 1805, in four languages, signed by Jefferson as President and Madison as Secretary of State. $3000 – 5000
    <b>Neal Auction Company: Louisiana Purchase Auction.<br>December 2 – 4, 2016</b>
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> After Marie Adrien Persac (American/Louisiana, 1827-1873), "Norman's Chart of the Lower Mississippi River from Natchez to New Orleans", 1858.<br>$50,000 – 70,000
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> [Mitchell's Universal Atlas], <i>A New Universal Atlas Containing Maps of the Various Empires, Kingdoms, States and Republics of the World…</i>, Philadelphia, Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., 1852. $2500 – 3500
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> Annie L. Colladay Braidwood (American/Pennsylvania, mid 19th c.), "Portrait of Andrew Jackson", 1866. $15,000 – 25,000
    <b>Neal Auction Company: Louisiana Purchase Auction.<br>December 2 – 4, 2016</b>
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> After George Caleb Bingham (American/Missouri, 1811-1879), "The Jolly Flat Boat Men", 1847, engraving on paper. $3000 – 5000
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> John James Audubon, <i>The New York Historical Society Edition of Audubon's Fifty Best Watercolors from The Original Watercolors Preparatory for...Birds of America</i>, 2006, limited #26 of 200. $5000 – 7000
    <b>Neal Auction Company Dec 2 – 4:</b> José Francisco Xavier de Salazar y Mendoza (Mexican/New Orleans, c. 1750-1802), "Portrait of Daniel William Coxe (1769 1852)", 1792. $100,000 – 150,000
  • <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> John Wycliffe. <i>WYCLIFFITE NEW TESTAMENT IN THE LATER VERSION, IN MIDDLE ENGLISH [ENGLAND, 1ST HALF OF THE 15TH CENTURY]</i>. $500,000-800,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English [King James Version]. <i>THE HOLY BIBLE, CONTEYNING THE OLD TESTAMENT, AND THE NEW… LONDON: ROBERT BARKER, 1611.</i> $400,000-600,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English. Tyndale's Pentateuch. <i>THE FIRSTE BOKE OF MOSES CALLED GENESIS [?FYFTE BOKE OF MOSES CALLED DEUTERONOMYE.] [ANTWERP: JOHAN HOOCHSTRATEN, 1530].</i> $300,000-500,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Eliot, John. <i>[BIBLE IN MASSACHUSET, NATICK DIALECT:] MAMUSSE WUNNEETUPANATAMWE UP-BIBLIUM GOD… CAMBRIDGE, MA: SAMUEL GREEN AND MARMADUKE JOHNSON, 1663–61.</i> $175,000-250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> [Italian Bible]. <i>BIBLE WITH PROLOGUES AND INTERPRETATIONS OF HEBREW NAMES, IN LATIN. [ITALY (PROBABLY BOLOGNA)], DATED 1273</I>.<br>$150,000-250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English, Coverdale's Version. <i>BIBLIA. THE BIBLE, THAT IS, THE HOLY SCRIPTURE OF THE OLDE AND NEW TESTAMENT, FAITHFULLY AND TRULY TRANLSATED OUT OF DOUCHE AND LATYN IN TO ENGLISH, 1535-1536.</i> $150,000-250,00
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible, Polyglot [The Complutensian Polyglot]. <i>VETUS TESTAMENTUM MULTIPLICI LINGUA NUNC PRIMO IMPRESSUM… [ALCALÀ DE HENARES: ARNAO GUILLÉN DE BROCAR, 1514–1517]</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Psalter in Greek. <i>[GREEK TITLE: PSALTÊRION]. VENICE: ALDUS MANUTIUS [CA. 1496-1498; NOT AFTER 1 OCTOBER 1498]</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in German. <i>BIBLIA, DAS IST DIE GANTZE HEILIGE SCHRIFT DEUDSCH.  AUGSBURG: HEYNRICH STEYNER, 1535</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Thomas à Kempis. <i>IMITATIO CHRISTI. [AUGSBURG:] GÜNTHER ZAINER, [NOT AFTER 6 MAY 1473]</i>. $50,000-70,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> The Four Gospels, in Greek. <i>FOUR GOSPELS WITH COMMENTARY, IN GREEK. [CONSTANTINOPLE, 11TH CENTURY]</i>. $50,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in Latin. <i>A LEAF FROM THE GUTENBERG BIBLE. [MAINZ: JOHANN GUTENBERG AND JOHANN FUST, 1455]</I>.<br> $50,000-70,000

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