• <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 14. Darwin, Charles. 1809-1882. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection... 1859.</i>. US$ 60,000-80,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 46. Smith, Adam. 1723-1790. <i>An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations.</i> US$ 70,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 224. CIVIL WAR. Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the War [1865-1866]. US$ 120,000-180,000.
    255 — add to caption: First Edition, Subscriber’s Copy
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 270. Serra, Junipero. 1713-1774, ET AL. Pangua, Francisco. Letter in Spanish, 1775. US$ 60,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 77. Apple 1 Motherboard, with label "Apple Computer 1 / Palo Alto. Ca. Copyright 1976." US$ 300,000-500,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 46. The 1934 Nobel Prize Medal for Physiology or Medicine. Presented to George Minot. US$ 200,000-300,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 39. Darwin, Charles. 1809-1882. Autograph Letter Signed ("Ch. Darwin"). US$ 70,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 4. Lubieniecki, Stanislaw. 1623-1675. <i>[Theatri Cometici pars posterior] Historia Cometarum...</i> US$ 25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 3. Vera rare George III mahogany and engraved brass orrery. US$ 200,000-250,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 163. Stéphane Mallarmé. An autograph manuscript for <i>Un coup de Dés jamais n'abolira le Hasard</i>. [Avril Ou Début MAI 1897]. Est. 500,000-800,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 109. Manet, Edouard - Edgar Allan Poe - Stéphane Mallarmé. <i>Le Corbeau. The Raven. 1875</i>. Est 80,000-120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 152. Edgar Degas. <i>Portrait of Stéphane Mallarmé and Auguste Renoir</i>, [16 Décembre 1895]. Est. 40,000-60,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 15. Baudelaire, Charles. <i>Les Fleurs du Mal. Paris, Poulet-Malassis et De Broise, 1861.</i> <br>Est. 80,000 - 120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 137. Mallarmé, Stéphane. Vers Sur un Galet D'Honfleur. [Eté 1892 OU Été 1894.] Est. 5,000-8,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 48. Gide, André - Maurice Denis. <i>Le Voyage d'Urien. Paris, Librairie de L’Art indépendant, 1893.</i> Est. 20,000-30,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 103. Mallarmé, Stéphane - Edgar Allan Poe. Manuscripts Autographs. [1870-1875 ET 1869]. Est. 80,000-120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 107. [Revue - Stéphane Mallarmé] La Derniere Mode. Gazette du monde et de la famille. Est. 40,000-60,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 110. Mallarmé, Stéphane - Edouard Manet. <i>L’après midi d'un Faune. Églogue. Paris, 1876.</i> Est. 30,000-50,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 160. Mallarmé, Stéphane. Premier état D'un Un Coup De Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard. Manuscrit Autographe. [1897].<br>Est. 60,000-80,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 164. Mallarmé, Stephane. 6 jeux d’épreuves Pour un Coup De Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard De l’édition définitive chez Vollard. Est. 100,000-150,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 198. [Méry Laurent] <i>Liber Amicorum De Méry Laurent</i>. 1875-Fin Des Années 1890]. Est. 50,000-80,000 EUR.
  • <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 52. Charles Schulz, Original Peanuts Snoopy Baseball Strip, U.S.A, 1964. Starting price $16,000.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 6.<br>Maurice Sendak (1928-2012), 'Max, Where the Wild Things Are', Pen & Ink, 2012. Starting price $1,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 13.<br>Leo Rijn after Dr. Seuss, Cowfish Maquette, U.S.A, 1998. Signed on stand. Starting price $1,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 17.<br>Dr. Seuss, Untitled, Color Pen & Ink, C. 1940. Signed ‘Dr Seuss’ lower left. Starting price $4,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 19.<br>Dr. Seuss, ‘I wonder how I offended George…’ Pen & Ink, C. 1930. Starting price $7,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 29.<br>Disney Studios, 'Queen, Snow White', Concept Sketch, U.S.A., C. 1937. Starting price $3,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 30.<br>Marc Davis, 'Sleeping Beauty in a Meadow', Production Cel, 1959. Signed. Starting price $1,200.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 50.<br>Charles Schulz, Original Peanuts Daily Strip, USA, 1966. Signed 'Schulz'. Starting price $10,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 58.<br>Chuck Jones, Signed, hand-painted Production Cels from Duck Dodgers, 1952. Starting price $4,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 77.<br>Stan Lee, Marvel Studios, Bishop,<br>X-Men, Production Cel, C.1995. <br>Starting price $240.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 79.<br>Warner Bros, 'New Adventures of Superman', C. 2000. Production Cel. Starting price $300.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 84.<br>Tim Burton, Mayor from Nightmare Before Christmas, C. 1993. Starting price $1,500.00.
  • Cowan's: American History. Timed Online Auction, Bidding Opens on October 15, 2015.
    <b>Cowan's Starts Oct 15th:</b> Abner Chapman, First Schoolteacher & Storekeeper in Union County, Ohio, Early 19th Century Store Ledger .... Est $250-$500.
    <b>Cowan's Starts Oct 15th:</b> Samuel Broadbent, Finely Hand-Painted Ivorytype of a Gentleman.<br>Est $750-$1000.

Rare Book Monthly

New Letter

Letters to the Editor

. April 04, 2011


I just read your piece about the New York constitution. Sadly this is one of the by-products of a marketplace with no responsibility such as eBay. A dealer or even reputable auction house would never have offered such a thing, and would be vilified if they did.

 My purchase of the other 1777 New York constitution illustrates the randomness of auctions. They are not only what happens that place and day, but that moment. Despite the transparency the Internet has made possible, this is still a very imperfect world; there are literally millions of books, each with their own small community of interest. Potential buyers may miss the sale, or have just spent a lot of money on something else, or have shifted their interests. If anything, the whole story illustrates how professionals can add value by vetting material, describing it correctly, and being willing to hold it until the right buyer comes along.



HOPEFULL? March 01, 2011

I click on READ MORE..and get an empty line asking for comment..on what? You've not let me read it!

We are looking at it some more. This has not happened to many people, so it appears perhaps some combination of operating system and/or browser may be causing a problem. If others are having this problem please let us know - Editor.

bookfever February 01, 2011

I enjoyed Susan Halas's article on bookselling, although I have a tendency to agree with Bruce that auction records can constitute a "reality check" in terms of valuing books.

Shortly after reading this article, I was researching a juvenile series I came across this blog (on the seriesbooks.com website) and just had to laugh

"Some people feel that it is their duty to tell every seller of a first printing copy of Nancy Drew #1 The Secret of the Old Clock that the book is valued at $1,000—regardless of the condition of the book up for sale. . . .

I seem to recall that a 1930A-1 Old Clock without a jacket sold in the summer of 2008 for around $1,000, but that was to the woman who was spending around $30,000 per month on series books that summer. She worked for a bank and had stolen $300,000 from her bank's vault. She later went to federal prison. That sale does not count because that buyer tended to pay around 10 times the actual value of books during that buying frenzy. People bid against her just to drive the prices up, and I know of at least one instance in which a seller shilled an auction in order to make her pay an extreme amount."

So I guess the bottom line is that no matter which you check out - current listed prices or auction records - you still need to use your expertise to determine the price you want to place on a book (or pay for it.)

Chris Volk

. November 23, 2010

Michael Stillman re Library Privatization

I don't know when you published it, but I just saw the above re the Santa Clarita Library lawsuits. One of the best explanations of the issues and suits I've seen.

Don Ricketts

. November 01, 2010

re: Santa Clarita Library

I understand that several libraries of the Ventura County System --where I live--are also joining or considering joining LSSI. It does seem clearly to be an issue of pensions and union negotiated salaries. With so much bad press about pensions in California (I am a retired librarian and soon to be retired bookseller) in the news this year, it is no wonder that this has again raised it's ugly head.
Thanks for making this issue more widely available to the booksellers of the nation.

. November 01, 2010

re: Better World Books


I read with interest your article on Better World Books, an
organization which holds itself forth as some sort of "humanitarian" and
"green" organization. The author of this article implied that if we as
book dealers were as smart as they, we could also be successful. Most
book dealers, myself included, think it is unethical to put up big green
boxes that say "donate books, do good" when indeed you are a for profit
corporation. This is the worst form of greenwashing. If they were
capable of shame, I would say "shame on them". Your article only helped
to legitimize this fraud.

Mark Holmen - Bookmark

Editor's Note: The writer carefully noted that partners receive only a "portion of revenues generated by donated books," and the donations produce "a decent amount of revenue for the corporation." This is a for-profit business that does some good deeds on the side and we were certainly not attempting to hide that fact.

. October 01, 2010

Your excellent newsletter

Fascinating. The only email re the trade I pay attention to.


. September 03, 2010

re: Dealer Catalogue Listings

I think this unbelievably ambitious project will do much to add meat
to the bones of your data-base. I do not sell 'great books' but I do
sell some 'good' books and I am frequently unable to find them in your
DB even as comprehensive as you are.
It seems that most of these are earlier works that may not have come to
auction in the last 50-100 years. Some are victims of the search

With that said, I have a hard time imagining surviving without your resources.
Your listings of Sabin et al. has been of an immeasurable help to me.
Maggs type descriptions are extremely useful to any antiquarian dealer.

Sincerely yours,

Kenny Parolini

. September 01, 2010

Thoughts on Adding Dealer Catalogues to the AED

I am a long-time collector of Western Americana with emphasis on
Californiana, with a particular concentration on the Gold Rush Period.
As a Research Member of the Americana Exchange, I am a very frequent
user of your database which I find to be a truly wonderful resource
for the advanced collector. Although I have a large collection
of my own of several hundred Americana catalogues dating back to the
19th century, no single collector or dealer could ever amass what you
have made so readily accessible.

As far as the letters "A" and "B" are concerned, in my areas of
interest I would encourage you to consider more of the 1915-1930
auction catalogues of the American Art Association /Anderson
Galleries, which are a wonderful resource on rare Western Americana.
Also, additional catalogues from Alta California Books would be a fine

Further along in the alphabet, additional catalogues of Holmes Book
Company (Oakland), Talisman Press (Georgetown), John Howell Books (San
Francisco), and Dawson's Book Shop (Los Angeles) would also be great

Among the major dealers further east, if the firms are willing to
permit their inclusion the marvelous catalogues of William Reese
Company (New Haven) and Michael Heaston (Austin) would be truly
wonderful additions. As I don't recall having seen any of their
catalogs referenced in the database, I suspect they may be unwilling
to permit their inclusion. If that is the case, I hope this will some
day change.

William J. Coffill (Sonora, CA)

. September 01, 2010

Thoughts on Adding Dealer Catalogues to the AED

Dawsons Book Shop of Los Angeles.... Book catalogs since 1905. Best
collection of Californiana & Western Americana.

Catalogs are available.

denny kruska

prints August 02, 2010

RE: Too Good to Be True


Although you didn't mention it, I would state the obvious, that the Ebay seller appears to actually have committed an insurance fraud against the US Postal Service. Obviously knowing that the piece was a reproduction, what better way to guarantee they get their selling price of $275 other than by packing the piece to ensure breakage during transit? You get your purchase price back from Ebay because the item was a fake, AND the seller gets to keep the $275 insurance claim paid by the Post Office because the piece was damaged in transit. A great way to "launder" reproductions by the unscrupulous seller and to leave the USPS holding the bag...

Mike August 01, 2010

Dear Mr. McKinney,

Your article about the book consigned to Jeff Thomas illustrates one of the problems that can arise when books are consigned.

A more frequent problem, in the antique trade--but also the book trade, is the permanent loss of consigned items in a dealer bankruptcy IF the very exact procedures of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) are not followed.

Consigned books may also be permanently lost, or spend years in limbo, should the IRS seize a dealer's business.

It would be helpful, for both dealers and collectors, if the exact requirements of the UCC--as they pertain to consigned items--were discussed in a future article.

. August 01, 2010

Dear Mr. McKinney:

I read with great interest your "Too Good to be True" column on your experience with acquiring a refund from Ebay on a purchase you found -not- to be a Currier & Ives lithograph.

For your information, Currier & Ives actually sold chromist-made reproductions, -not- lithographs. This link to my monograph documents that fact: click here.

Any questions or comments, please contact me.


Gary Arseneau

artist, creator of original lithographs, scholar & author

P.O. Box 686
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32035

(904) 277-3721

gwarseneau@hotmail.com (email)

garyarseneau.blogspot.com (blog)

garyarseneau.com (website)

. August 01, 2010

Nice job. As always I look forward to receiving your AE monthly.

Best regards,

John M. Martello


wellesley5 July 03, 2010

Bruce McKinney's article on Bolerium is the most literate/literary description of a bookshop that I have ever read. The entire website is a source of invaluable information and is a "must read" on the first of every month.

Friend July 01, 2010


Jeff Weber makes very critical points about Amazon [see letter below]. The current issue, while interesting, is unenforceable and impractical. Amazon isn't going to waste energy trying to police the millions of individuals listing items for sale on its site and others. However, the points raised by Mr. Weber have a greater financial impact overall on the Amazon retailers. The postage rates are unreasonable. Yet some Amazon retailers make their profit on the postage since a paperback can generally be sent for about $1.00. The putative "price" merely covers the listing fee. Yet here is the dilemma - Amazon's internet prominence outperforms all the others by miles. Consumers start and generally finish at Amazon - not AbeBooks, Biblio or [fill in the blank]. It's about on-line traffic and the other sites - despite being specialized - just don't drive the market. And moribund ebay essentially turned the wrong way (under Meg Whitman) and allowed Amazon to dominate the space. So forget the mirage of the European contretemps and find a way to get the good folks at Amazon to solve the very real concerns expressed by Mr. Weber.

. July 01, 2010

AE monthly on Amazon pricing

Dear Mr. Stillman:

Your article was of considerable interest. I suspect that the
instances where Amazon may actually look for evidence of unbalanced retailing are
few. Instead they may be simply using verbiage to make people think this is their
policy - and it is a good policy to have representing their company. But in practice
it would be impossible for them to actually watch the prices of every book from
every bookseller in all the web-sites dealer's use.

But the issues for me are even deeper: Amazon does not act in any way to protect
either the consumer or the bookseller - thus falling well short of the usual
business practices that all dealers know are necessary - primarily guaranteeing your
product. Amazon does not. For example: in the US Amazon refuses to collect sales tax
which is due for every book shipped within the state you operate in. For me this is
California. Therefore Amazon leaves every bookseller exposed to the wrath of the IRS
and auditors in the issue of tax collection. In addition their standard rate
shipping policy is ridiculous: they offer $3.99 for shipping anything, be it a
paperback or a $10,000 book or a 50 volume set. There are no exceptions. No dealer
will comply to this stringent system, but they must work within it because that is
all that is offered. I am constantly interacting with the Amazon client asking for
more shipping, especially for international orders. Amazon's reimbursement of $12.49
for overseas shipping is even under what the global rate envelope charges are at
$12.80. To add: there is never any room for insurance. In fact this angers some
customers who feel that the set shipping rates of Amazon are what is entirely fair
on their part. However the reverse is true: the shipping rates must be allowed to
vary in accordance with the appropriate charges and insurance for any type of order.
Amazon will also not back up and pay for an item that a customer does not receive.
Who is liable for a loss? You can be sure it is not Amazon. They are the middleman
collecting a percentage - they are not interested in paying for lost merchandise.
So, let the buyer beware - but in this case all buyers on Amazon are not aware. If
they knew that some books were sold on Amazon at a loss to the retailer, would these
same clients understand the abuse the dealer is undertaking from Amazon? Probably
not for now. The Amazon commission is partly a sliding scale - I do not know the
specific of it, but if a book is cheap enough, say $1 to list, their discount is
MORE than $1. Thus they actually force the dealer to sell items at less than $0.00
to get an item out the door.

I have not addressed specifically the issues of price fixing, but Amazon seems to do
nothing in the US that I know about that enforces their policy. And at the same
time, based on the tax collecting issue, Amazon seems to be strong enough to stand
up to the federal government and not become a tax collector. I believe (though I can
not prove it), that California raised its sales tax last year from 8.5% to 9.75% to
make up for the difference in internet sales that they can not regulate. Thus Amazon
is not the only one to blame - but they are a key contributor.

I invite your interaction.

Jeff Weber

IslandSF June 04, 2010

Stillman asks: "Will newsmen be replaced with bloggers, long on opinion, short on facts?"

Ironic, because that is just what he does.

It is easy to consume a meal that is short of nutrients if you are unfamiliar with a truly nutritious repast; thus many can become used to a constant diet of 'blogging' and take it for real information.

It is easy to have someone else interpret the facts for you, but talented analysts usually get jobs for real publications and don't just write for free for their own companies or websites. Perhaps that is why the Wall Street Journal increased its readership and why tens of thousands of "blogs" are left moldering, to clutter up the internet.

. June 01, 2010

Mr. Stillman,

That was an utterly fantastic piece about the Los Angeles book "dealer" case. Thanks
so much for bringing it to our attention.



. June 01, 2010

re: eBay sniping

Tom McKinney,

I have been working with eBay as either a seller or bidder for many years, since 1998 in fact. I have seen their system go through great growth and the sad decline that is presently underway as they make policies and pricing changes to drive away the individual sellers which tend to have the most interesting items on average.

After losing some unique items which were important to us because we overslept the auction close, we decided to stop revolving our life activities to when we could be next to the computer and bid on an auction. The eBay policy of a fixed close time changes the successful strategies for bidding. It makes no difference who is the highest a day, an hour, or a minute before the close. Only the high bidder at the end counts. Hence sniping becomes the tool of choice for people who want to win more auctions and generally pay less for each item won.

I would not, however, use a local program. This would require that your computer be synchronized with the eBay clocks (not merely Apple system time) and that there be a fast connection and an awake computer at all times when you'd be placing an automated bid. For this we found that web site services were a better choice. We initially used AuctionStealer.com but left them when we lost a couple auctions due to service outages.

We now use eSnipe.com and have for many years with satisfaction. There is a fee for using these services based on how much you use it. With eSnipe you buy points for a fairly nominal sum.

There is a tool which can be installed on Firefox so that any eBay auction item page has an eSnipe window to log in and bid.

Of course these systems need to have your eBay user and password so don't use the same ones on eBay that you use for other important things like PayPal, your bank, email, etc.

I also have the eBay app on my iPhone to check in on auctions during the day but not to bid.

Keep in mind that eBay has bid increments so it is necessary to place a bid high enough to exceed this. Hence, if an auction starts at 19.99 and you bid 20.10, unless your bid is the first, you won't have a chance because the increment above 19.99 is higher than 11 cents.

The eSnipe default is 6 seconds before the auction. Although tempted, I have not felt compelled to reduce this to 5 or 4 seconds. The shorter the time, the more chance that the bid may fail.

In general, it's not so much an issue of who bid closest to the close but rather who has placed the highest top bid who wins. It just seems like the former situation when you are starting out.

Don't place a bid with an even amount ending in .00 or .50. Use something odd, especially between .50 and .99, to give yourself a minimal edge in bidding.

The eBay system, with all of its problems, still yields many items which are findable nowhere else. A great number of the prizes in my collection come from there. I make extensive use of the 100 saved searches they give each account though that is a topic for another day should you be interested.

James D. Keeline

San Diego, CA

. May 05, 2010

re: Portland Book Store Fire

Hello Fellow Booksellers,

I have looked into what we can do to help Phil, following the fire which totally destroyed Great Northwest Bookstore. The cost of cleanup alone will be in the tens of thousands of dollars. That means money is what is most needed. A fund has already been established with On Point Credit Union. I have discussed this with the other officers and we decided that PAUBA should donate $300. In addition, I encourage individuals to contribute what they can.

You can contribute in person at any On Point Credit Union or you can use your electronic payment systems. The account number is 1005903 and the address is P.O. Box 3750, Ptld, OR 97208.

I'll let you know if I hear of anything else we can do to help.


Debbie Cross

Wrigley-Cross Books

PMB 455

2870 N.E. Hogan Road Suite E

Gresham OR 97030-3175

Phone: (503) 667-0807

Toll Free: (877) 694-1467


. May 03, 2010

Dear Bruce:

In your AE article about the New York Book Fair you referred to ILAB as the ABAA's European equivalent. Technically this is incorrect, ILAB (International League of Antiquarian Booksellers) is a world umbrella organization, of which both ABAA and over 20 other national associations (ABA in the UK, SLAM in France, and so forth) are members.


Tom Congalton

Editor's note: Thank you for the head's up. The International League of Antiquarian Booksellers is an organization whose membership consists of 22 national bookseller groups from all over the world. The individual booksellers who are members of each of these national organizations are thereby members of ILAB too. More can be learned about this organization and its services on the ILAB website: www.ilab.org.

Grum April 07, 2010

Many dealers regularly visiting the UK will know of Quintos/Francis Edwards shop in London's Charing Cross Road - the Quintos monthly restock (1st Tuesday of the month) has been the source of many a bargain. In case your heart sinks to see it no longer alongisde Leicester Square tube station, fear not. It has moved further up Charing Cross Road to #72 - which in some ways is actually better than the former site. Quintos' stock is in the large basement. Just thought you all might like to know.

Bookman* April 01, 2010


Really, there is no such thing as a discount. Any reduction in price for any reason is simply a new price. The rest is all fluff.
I view discounts as morphing a 'hoped for' price from the Land of Oz into the real world.

I like the bare-knuckles approach of Walmart, they don't advertise discount prices, they advertise low prices. It must work.

As a buyer, I don't pay any attention to the fluff. If the price is right I buy, if not, I pass.

As an aside, as a dealer I don't feel correct offering discounts to special people at special occasions, (ie: book fairs) and then charging a 'full price' to those who aren't so special.

Sellers can do all sorts of marketing dances, but at the end of the day it's going to be about Supply and Demand.

Bob Benham

for Book World

Xanman April 01, 2010


Dear Americana Exchange:

I read with great interest your "New Reality for Book Fairs" article, and would like to offer a few observations.

I have been expanding the number of shows at which I exhibit for the past 10 years, and have been steadily moving away from depending on the internet, or in-store traffic. Many of the customers I have developed over these last few years draw from almost every age group, and demographic. This has necessitated that I bring exhibition stock in a number of different categories, as well as a range of price points.

Next, I would like to comment on the statement that the "serious buyer checks the net." Yes, many of them do check the net, but most of my best buyers care FAR MORE about the condition of the items offered to them in person, the personal experience of having those items treated with enthusiasm and respect, as well as the very real concern by almost all of them that they cannot trust the descriptions and pictures they read online. Many of them occasionally purchase from different websites, ebay, auctions, etc., and yet, they all have stories of books that they've ordered which have sincerely disappointed them when not purchased in person.

In addition, most of my regular clientele understands that they are rewarded for their ongoing patronage by being offered books before they are listed online, or in catalogues, or other venues. That's not to say they are loyal to only one, or two, booksellers (i.e. Rosenbach and Huntington), but they definitely enjoy a chance to buy material before anyone else.

There are also many of my customers, who do not buy online, and prefer to touch and see the books, as well as find something they haven't predetermined to find by certain sorts of searches. These are the treasure hunters who don't want to wait for a week or more to receive their books, but instead want to enjoy them immediately. These clients should never be ignored, or underestimated.

Finally, I definitely agree about a discount for customers who often patronize my stock at Book Fairs, or through Catalogues. I would rather let my direct customers have a discount, than pay the monies to ABE, Alibris, Amazon, and others.

Best regards,

Kol Shaver

Zephyr Used & Rare Books

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A patriot who fought with George Washington Superb Daguerreotype of Baltus<br>Stone at age 101 (1846).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Edward Curtis portrait of Honovi, Walpi Snake Priest "Honovi was one of the author's principal informants" (1910).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Execution of the Lincoln Assassination Conspirators by Alexander Gardner (1865).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Beecher, Henry Ward Beecher, and the other siblings with their father Lyman Beecher. By Mathew Brady (1850s).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> From Slaves to World-Famous Entertainers Millie-Christine, "The Two-Headed Nightingale" (c. 1868-71)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Goldfield, Nevada Photograph Collection Fabled Western Mining Boomtown (1905-1906)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Tycoon-Collector Benjamin Richardson poses with his great-grandson as appeared in parade.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Alexander Gardner portrait of Lincoln the only known copy, ex-John Hay (1863).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Magnificent Niagara Falls album with a strong provenance (1867).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Spectacular American West Album From Yosemite to Salt Lake City to San Francisco.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph letter signed by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to Senator John William Clark Watson, Richmond, 1865. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph poem by John Quincy Adams from an album kept by Abby Smith, w. inscription signed by her grandfather, John Adams, 1820s. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Typed letter signed by Theodore Roosevelt to assemblyman Michael A. Schapp, New York, 1913. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph letter signed by Richard Wagner to Hofkapellmeister Max Seifriz, Zürich, 1853. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Photograph signed and inscribed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to librettist Paul Collin, 1888. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> <i>Katalog der Wiener Kunstschau</i> signed and inscribed by Egon Schiele, 1916. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Letter signed by Mohandas K. Gandhi to Dr. John Haynes Holmes, Sevagram, 1940. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Photograph signed and inscribed by Marilyn Monroe to Dulce Brito, circa 1957. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Two typed letters signed by William Faulkner, Los Angeles, 1943. $4,000 to $6,000.

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