• <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Excessively Rare Benjamin Franklin Imprint. Estaugh (John). <i>A Call to the Unfaithful Professors of Truth</i>, Philadelphia: Printed by B. Franklin, 1744. €7,000 – 10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Original Signed Volume from the Dean Swift's Library. [Swift (Dr. Jonathan)] Grotius (Hugo). <i>De Jure Belli ac Pacis Libri Tres</i>, Amsterdam: (J. Blaeu) 1670. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Cresswell (Samuel Gurney). <i>A Series of Eight Sketches in Colour; together with a Coloured Map of the Route</i>, London: (Day & Son) July 25, 1854.<br>€15,000 – 20,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Of Legendary Rarity - First Printing of Shakespeare Outside England. Shakespeare (Wm.). <i>The Works of Shakespeare</i> In Eight Volumes. Dublin: 1726.<br>€7,000 – 10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Lewin (W.). <i>The Birds of Great Britain</i>, 8 vols in 4, with 335 hand-coloured plates, 1795 – 1801. €1,500 – 2,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> 18th Century Manuscript Relating to Massachusetts Bay, c. 1750.<br>€350 – 500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Alexander (Wm.). <i>Picturesque Representations of The Dress and Manners of the Chinese</i>, with 50 hand-coloured plates, 1814. €600 – 800
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Manuscript Estate Atlas - Neville (Arthur Richard). <i>The Estate of Sir John Coghill Bart</i>, 1791. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Unique Collection of Ballads by Brendan Behan Behan. €3,000 – 4,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Original Manuscript of Edith Somerville's Unpublished Children's Book. Somerville (Edith). <i>GROWLY-WOWLY. Or, The Story of the Three Little Pigs</i>. €3,500 – 5,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Full Set of Cuala Press Broadsides with fine hand-coloured illustrations by Jack B. Yeats, 1908 – 1915. €4,000 – 6,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Eyzinger (Michael). <i>Ad Leonis Belgici Topographicam atque Historicam Descriptionem</i>, [Cologne:] 1586. €3,000 – 4,000
  • <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>Die Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie.</i> Leipzig: Johann Ambrosius Barth, 1916.<br>$80,000 – 120,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in English, Signed Integrally ("Isaac Newton"). $50,000 – 70,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life</i>. London: John Murray, 1859. $25,000 – 35,000
    <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.</i> London: Benjamin Motte, 1729.<br>$20,000 – 30,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEISENBERG, WERNER. Autograph Manuscript entitled "<i>Entwicklung der Theorie der Elementarteilche,</i>” [1964].<br>$15,000 – 25,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> BERNOULLI, DANIEL. <i>Hydrodynamica, sive De viribus et motibus fluidorum commentarii.</i> Strasbourg: Johann Heinrich Decker for Johann Reinhold Dulsecker, 1738. $5,000 – 7,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> [TARKOVSKY, ANDREI ARSENIEVICH.] STRUGATSKY, BORIS AND ARKADY. Typed Manuscript for <i>Stalker</i>, being the director's working script, 1977. $150,000 – 200,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. Typed Manuscript of "Marlin Off the Morro: A Cuban Letter," n.p., [1933]. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> SALINGER, JEROME DAVID. 4 Autograph Letters, 2 of which Signed ("Jerry") and 6 Typed Letters, 2 of which Initialed ("J"). $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> PASTERNAK, BORIS LEONIDOVICH. Typed Manuscript Carbon, "Doktor Zhivago," with some typed corrections, Moscow, 1948. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> MILNE, ALAN ALEXANDER. Autograph Manuscript Signed 3 times ("A.A. Milne"), entitled "Peace with Honour: An Enquiry into the War Convention," 1934.<br>$30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> FROST, ROBERT. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("Robert Frost"), titled "Gold for Christmas," 1952. $15,000 – 20,000
  • <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 202. Geronimo - Apache. £600-800
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 225.<br>A Chief of the Desert - Navaho. £1000-1500
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 267.<br>An Oasis in the Bad Lands. £600-800
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 303.<br>The Scout in Winter - Apsaroke. £800-1200
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 320.<br>Sitting Bear - Arikara. £500-700
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 475. <br>A Nakoaktok Chief's Daughter. <br>£600-800
  • <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> John Wycliffe. <i>WYCLIFFITE NEW TESTAMENT IN THE LATER VERSION, IN MIDDLE ENGLISH [ENGLAND, 1ST HALF OF THE 15TH CENTURY]</i>. $500,000-800,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English [King James Version]. <i>THE HOLY BIBLE, CONTEYNING THE OLD TESTAMENT, AND THE NEW… LONDON: ROBERT BARKER, 1611.</i> $400,000-600,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English. Tyndale's Pentateuch. <i>THE FIRSTE BOKE OF MOSES CALLED GENESIS [?FYFTE BOKE OF MOSES CALLED DEUTERONOMYE.] [ANTWERP: JOHAN HOOCHSTRATEN, 1530].</i> $300,000-500,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Eliot, John. <i>[BIBLE IN MASSACHUSET, NATICK DIALECT:] MAMUSSE WUNNEETUPANATAMWE UP-BIBLIUM GOD… CAMBRIDGE, MA: SAMUEL GREEN AND MARMADUKE JOHNSON, 1663–61.</i> $175,000-250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> [Italian Bible]. <i>BIBLE WITH PROLOGUES AND INTERPRETATIONS OF HEBREW NAMES, IN LATIN. [ITALY (PROBABLY BOLOGNA)], DATED 1273</I>.<br>$150,000-250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English, Coverdale's Version. <i>BIBLIA. THE BIBLE, THAT IS, THE HOLY SCRIPTURE OF THE OLDE AND NEW TESTAMENT, FAITHFULLY AND TRULY TRANLSATED OUT OF DOUCHE AND LATYN IN TO ENGLISH, 1535-1536.</i> $150,000-250,00
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible, Polyglot [The Complutensian Polyglot]. <i>VETUS TESTAMENTUM MULTIPLICI LINGUA NUNC PRIMO IMPRESSUM… [ALCALÀ DE HENARES: ARNAO GUILLÉN DE BROCAR, 1514–1517]</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Psalter in Greek. <i>[GREEK TITLE: PSALTÊRION]. VENICE: ALDUS MANUTIUS [CA. 1496-1498; NOT AFTER 1 OCTOBER 1498]</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in German. <i>BIBLIA, DAS IST DIE GANTZE HEILIGE SCHRIFT DEUDSCH.  AUGSBURG: HEYNRICH STEYNER, 1535</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Thomas à Kempis. <i>IMITATIO CHRISTI. [AUGSBURG:] GÜNTHER ZAINER, [NOT AFTER 6 MAY 1473]</i>. $50,000-70,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> The Four Gospels, in Greek. <i>FOUR GOSPELS WITH COMMENTARY, IN GREEK. [CONSTANTINOPLE, 11TH CENTURY]</i>. $50,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in Latin. <i>A LEAF FROM THE GUTENBERG BIBLE. [MAINZ: JOHANN GUTENBERG AND JOHANN FUST, 1455]</I>.<br> $50,000-70,000

Rare Book Monthly

New Letter

Letters to the Editor

Abigale December 06, 2006

I have just received a book for christmas. The problem is, it is very old and I am afraid of it falling apart. I really do not know were to look up such a treasure. Could you give me some info?
Graded Classics Series: Poems and Tales, Poe. Published in 1911. B.F. Johnson Publishing Co. Richmond Virginia.
Any information would greatly be received.

Abigale

Editor's Response

If your are looking for value, we suggest going to www.abebooks.com and using their Advanced Search to try to find other copies of your book. Abe has the largest number of copies of old books being offered for sale, so there is a good chance your book may be offered by someone. This does not mean that their price is an accurate reflection of value (frequently the asking price is too high), but it may provide a ballpark estimate. In the case of your book, we could not find a match. However, we would not expect a high value for it. First of all, this is a much later printing of some Poe works, evidently meant for school children. Such books rarely are of significant value. B.F. Johnson was evidently an early 20th century southern publisher, and some of their southern history works are of interest and some value. The school books seem less so. There are a number of other of their "graded classics" offered, and generally they bring from a couple of dollars for those in mediocre shape, to low double digits for those in good shape.


. December 03, 2006

AE article on eBay signatures auction prices

I'm a subscriber who enjoys the newsletter quite a bit, and I usually find it very helpful.

Was surprised and disappointed though at the article by Burnham on eBay signatures. I thought it very poorly done -- leaving only a few sentences of warning about fakes. eBay is clearly flooded with both fake signatures and fake COA's to go with them. There should be a great deal of warning -- this article, I think, rather encouraged the sheep to gladly go to the wolves. Not enough is being said anywhere about the rampant dishonestly on eBay, and I think a professional outfit like AE cannot simply touch on eBay lightly like this without dealing with this issue.

There is a great difference between the remaining outlets with professional standards and the "buyer beware" sites -- and AE should clearly stand with the former.

Andrew Halldorson

Sleepy Hollow Bookshops


Editor's Note

We appreciate the heads up on the fraud issues pointed out in this letter and the one which follows. There are some wonderful opportunities on eBay, but it is very much a "buyer beware" forum, and this issue should have been pointed out, including that of phony signatures, COAs, and just about anything else. There are definite advantages to buying from reputable auction houses and dealers, and this security is what one can lose when tracking down deals on eBay.


. December 02, 2006

re: "Top Values of Signed Books on eBay"

I have a problem with a bookseller advising, "Try to make sure that the signature is authentic, that it has a certificate of authority (COA)..."



We all know they are worth only the paper they are printed on, and I'm surprised that the Americana Exchange published such a statement.

Heidi Congalton


. November 02, 2006

One comment I have made to a number of show promoters: Take the
"Antiquarian" out of the show title. Many people who would be otherwise
curious about a book fair or even beginning collectors, are utterly
intimidated by the high-falutin' sound of "Antiquarian." Nor does the term
truly represent the largest percentage of the stock at shows.

It's up to promoters to make their shows as widely-appealing as
possible....to one and all. I'm not suggesting free balloons and popcorn,
but there is plenty of opportunity to make them more attractive, as well as
to offer educational programs and displays.

Certainly the rising interest in ephemera of all sorts presents one
opportunity to expand the context of the traditional "book fair" in creating
a draw.

Good talking with whomever that was at the entrance to the Seattle show a
few weeks ago. Nice report, too!

Regards,

Lee Kirk

The Prints & The Paper


Response:

Lee,


Thank you for the comment. My wife Jenny and I made the trip to
Seattle to speak with folks about their show experience and I'm glad
we had the chance to meet.

Bruce McKinney


. November 01, 2006

Hello,

Thank you for the AE monthly.

I take exception with Michael Stillman's classification of ABE as
"the largest old and used books listing site". It is no longer in the
main "old and used".

With the inclusion of relisters, print on demand, new books, mass
marketers of remainder stock, they are clearly not targeted at "old
and used". The latest inclusion of a quantity field verifies that and
it will be interesting to see how this is used by some of the bulk
listers.

By their own admission the formal antiquarian bookdealer (as opposed
to home, basement, & charity sellers) who after all is the purveyor
of the "old and used" is no longer their target and this section of
the industry provides a diminishing selection of books on this site.
100 million listings is a lot of listings, but 100 million books?
Pure marketing hype, they are a long way from that.

Regards


Ian Balchin

Fables Bookshop


. November 01, 2006

Hi Bruce:

This is a great issue. I am really getting a lot out of the material.
Thank you for providing such informative content.


Brant Mittler

San Antonio, Texas


. November 01, 2006

Dear Bruce,

We thank you for your newsletter. Joe has been selling books for over 50 years now through several book shops and mailing lists. Thirty years ago we used an inky, messy mimeograph machine and a typewriter to get our book lists into the mail.

Times have certainly changed....a lot.

Keep 'em coming,

J & T Nie


piratelady October 21, 2006

I am looking for a forum to sell some antique books. Could you please direct me to an appropriate venue?


Thank you.

D. Hensel

Editor's Response:

The first question is whether these are valuable old books or ordinary ones. This will determine the appropriate course. If you do not know, I would first go to the Advanced Search screen at www.abebooks.com, enter title, author, date and publisher, to see whether other copies of what you have are being offered, and if so, for what prices. The asking prices on Abe are likely higher than you can expect to get, but at least it will give you a ballpark whether what you have is valuable or common. If you don't find your books even offered on Abe, then they may be relatively rare, and perhaps (though not necessarily) valuable. At this point, you might want to purchase a short-term Visitor's membership to this site and search the AE Bibliographic Database, as this may find records on pricier books than are found on Abe. Once you have an idea what your titles are worth, you will not only have a better idea of where to sell, but just as importantly, how much to sell for.

Among the selling sites for books are Abebooks, Alibris, Choosebooks, and the "Books for Sale" on this site. All have their strengths, but the charges and technical requirements make selling on these sites more appropriate for a bookseller, rather than an individual. However, if you have a large quantity of reasonably valuable books, you may want to consider becoming one, even if only temporarily. I believe amateurs can still offer books for sale via Amazon without incurring a charge unless they sell, but Amazon is more a marketplace for used and not so valuable antique books rather than valuable old ones. Of course, there is always eBay. Don't shrug this one off. It can be good for middle range old books, perhaps valued in the $50-$100 range. Sometimes you will get a good price, other times you won't, but this is your best shot at selling them and selling them quickly.

If you discover that what you have is of reasonable value, you may want to contact an auction house or a bookseller. Major auction houses can be found under the link to "auction houses" on the sidebar. The largest houses like Sotheby's and Christie's will probably only be interested if your average book is worth in the thousands, but others will go for books in the $100+ range, some even $50. They may get good value for you on some books, not on others, but they should be able to move a lot of inventory quickly. If your books are of lower value, perhaps a local auction house will be interested.

If your books are of some value, you may also find an interested bookseller. They may be willing to come in and buy the whole lot. If a higher value, you may want to look for someone who specializes in the type you have, even if far away. Otherwise, a local seller is more appropriate. Be sure you get a handle on value first, as some booksellers will be honest in their valuations, while others will lowball you hoping you don't notice the difference.


. October 20, 2006

Dear Sir,



On your site you state Southerans of London as being the oldest book shop in the world (1761).



I thought you might like to know that there are a few older bookshops in The UK,
the oldest in the world being Cambridge University Press Bookshop (1581).



Regards



Phil Salway

Institute of Biotechnology

University of Cambridge


. October 12, 2006

Dear aemonthly,

Thank you for the interesting article about the Betjeman hoax. For me, however, this was slightly spoilt by four mistakes:

1. There is no such word as "shined". The part participle of "shine" is, of course, "shone".

2. The writer says that Sir John Betjeman is "not exactly a household name". This may be the case in America, and clearly the writer had never heard of him before learning about the hoax, but the fact remains that Sir John is without any doubt the most famous and best loved English poet in history. Ask 100 English (not Scottish) people to name one English poet and probably 98 of them will say Betjeman, even if they can't spell it. (The Scots would go for Burns, of course).

3. "Hoaxter" might be an American word, I'm not sure, but over here the word is "hoaxer".

4. "The universe contains about one person" is not a very acurate statement unless we are talking about some very deep philosophy indeed. I think the word "such" has been accidentally omitted.

Kind regards,

Jonathan Cocking

London



Writer's response

You will have to forgive us Americans for not being very adept at speaking United Kingdomish. In a land where we count George W. Bush among the "best and the brightest," just four errors in an article should be looked upon as a step forward.


. October 11, 2006

I just read your article on the stolen Mormon books from DUP and our subsequent involvment. I just thought I'd point out that your story had a couple of things wrong.

1. The books were not worth 1 million dollars; they were poor quality Mormon books and were probably worth little more than $200,000. The more the story progressed the more the press and the police added to their value.

2. The two books offered to Eborn Books were not two first editions. One was a 1858 New York edition worth about $2,000. We offered $1,000 for that one. The other book was indeed a first edition, but it a) had no title page; b) had about 30 missing pages; c) did not have the original binding; and d) was in horrible condition. (DUP didn't even know it was a first edition; they had it listed as an "unknown edition missing title page." At best it was worth $20,000 and we offered $10,000 for it. [We usually pay half of what we're going to sell things for.]

Not that it really matters now; but the press and misinformation sure exaggerated the story and left out details. For example, it wasn't Lindsay who sold us the books; it was a woman. Anyway.........just thought I'd give you a few more accurate details.

Bret Eborn / Eborn Books 10-10-6


. August 25, 2006

re: Munselliana

Dear Mr. McKinney,



I'm at last catching up on my reading this evening, and am enjoying your August issue of AE monthly (as I enjoy all of your issues).



I was particularly anxious to read about your travels through upstate New York, having been born there and having spent the last three years in Syracuse. I was therefore particularly gratified to find mention of Joel Munsell and your interest in his imprints. Perhaps you are not aware that Syracuse University Library has, to my knowledge, the largest and most complete collection of Munselliana, formed largely by collector Henry Bannister. The collection is mostly, if not entirely cataloged, so I would encourage you to browse the Syracuse University Library online catalog. Nearby Hamilton College also has an excellent collection of Munsell imprints. Although not quite so complete as the collection at Syracuse, there are variants at Hamilton that are not found in the Syracuse collection. At Syracuse, the most knowledgeable person about the Munsell and Bannister is curator William La Moy.



Now back to my reading, and your next article.



Christian Dupont

Director, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

University of Virginia


. August 24, 2006

re: Texas Missing Documents


Dear Bruce and Michael:

I was glad to see on Americana Exchange Michael Stillman's article about the missing Texas documents, even if I do not agree with some of the statements.



I think it would have been a great service to everyone to post the link to the Texas Missing List, making it possible for collectors, dealers, auction houses, appraisers, and institutional buyers to know what is missing.

Here is the link: http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/missingintro.html




I have worked with the State and Texana quite a bit, and I can tell you that the State of Texas is incredibly conservative and even-handed in its claims. If you want to see other cases of replevin of documents gone missing long ago, check out the current case in South Carolina. That makes Texas look exceedingly mild.

The best intelligence on the Texas Missing List is in the State's internet inventory and statement.

Dorothy Sloan

www.dsloan.com


sam August 23, 2006

Sir,

I have two books in manuscript of the late great indian poets, writers, and writups with their Sketch and painting since 1941.
Can You suggest me the best auction prise will be and how can i realise its value.

Thanks
Sanjay Srivastava


. August 01, 2006

re: "Texas Sues Private Owner"

Dear Bruce,

I always read each AE monthly avidly, but I did have a concern with Michael
Stillman's piece on Texas. In no place did the word "replevin" appear, and
the case clearly derives from the principle of replevin. I was bit surprised
not to see the word mentioned. Would you please direct Michael to the
Manuscript Society (which has a "Replevin fund"), on the question (Oak
Knoll has just started distributing their titles). A number of state
archivists have started pursuing replevin vigorously since the 1990s, and it
looks like Texas has joined that number. It's a hot button issue with
archivists.

You might also consider having an interview with Rich Oram of UT's Harry
Ransom Center (he's also current chair of the RBMS Committee on Theft), to
talk about the HRC's attempt to retrieve books stolen by a volunteer, and
you might use his comments and HRC's strategy to contrast with how
archivists have used replevin. HRC has a "compensation fund" which, while
it seems to be used to "buy" back books, is being used to compensate
innocent buyers, and seems to make people more amenable to returning books.
I was quite skeptical of the idea, but personal experience has changed my
perspective.

I can't recall if replevin was used in repatriating the North Carolina Bill
of Rights which were liberated from that state by a Yankee soldier.

All best,

Paul

Paul W. Romaine


Michael Stillman's Response

Thank you for the heads up on replevin and the Manuscript Society's involvement. The legal doctrine of replevin does not appear to be used in this case for two reasons, though the underlying principle is involved. To the best of my recollection, "replevin" is one of those old common law concepts that applies to the return of goods inappropriately converted, or taken. The reasons why it does not appear to be used here are:

(1). Texas has a specific statute which enables governmental entities to take back old public records. There is no reason to employ older, less certain common law rules when you have a clear statute that allows you to act.

(2). The replevin rules are based on an improper taking of the material. From what I can see, no one has made the claim of improper taking in the Texas case, and if that is what they believe, it does not mean the state can prove it. The Texas statute makes it easier to retrieve the goods as it does not require proving the material was inappropriately taken, which could be difficult here. Most likely it was, but it is also possible they sold the material or simply tossed it away.

Of course this is a special circumstance, these being public documents and Texas having a specific law dealing with the issue. The greater overall issue is more difficult. Certainly the monitoring of sites like eBay for stolen material is an important issue, and the fact of wrongful taking much easier to establish on material that recently disappeared. Material that disappeared long ago is harder to establish rights and wrongs. There must have been tons of old government records thrown away as junk two centuries ago which today would be valuable. Should the government have a right to seize, without compensation, things legally obtained long ago because it is now valuable? I have books sold off by libraries that lack deaccession stamps, though I know they were legally obtained (I bought them myself years ago). How could I prove now I bought the books rather than stole them? Should libraries be able to go back and seize the books they sold off a century ago because today they are valuable? Will I have to return arrowheads thousands of years old since perhaps they were stolen from some ancient Indian leaders? This whole issue is an enormous can of worms, and hard to figure out how to settle fairly. However, the creation of a fund to recompense innocent owners of such material is, at least, helpful.


. August 01, 2006

re: "Truth in Pricing"

I read the article about real prices. It's very interesting. For us trying to sell from Australia its even more frustrating. With the average cost of a novel of $10.00 australian and the shipping of a book over 1 kg. to the USA being $ 28.00 by air, often I get an inquiry for an oversea sale that fails on the cost of shipping. When I send a set of books to the USA weighing just over 5 kg, the books cost 65.00 the postage 112.00. and now the Australian post is stopping the economy air from the beginning of September. Apparently this is a world wide trend to remove the most cost effective transport.

Yours

Peter Koelndorfer

for Medlow Bath Books


. August 01, 2006

re: Upstate New York Perspective

Hi Bruce,

You are not wrong! I have around 700 books on-line. My stock here is 12,000

Regards

Chris Baron


. July 23, 2006

Dear Mr. McKinney,

Congratulations on your fine editorial re admitted map thief E. Forbes Smiley III. You made a number of excellent points ("first-time caught").

I hope you will also write to the judges involved in sentencing Mr. Smiley. I have heard that Smiley's college friends (who never knew how he conducted his business) will undertake a letter writing campaign on his behalf.

The more the judges hear from those who see the damage he has caused, the better the chance that he will get an appropriate sentence.

Thanks for listening.

Sincerely,

George Ritzlin

George Ritzlin Antique Maps & Prints

1937 Central Street

Evanston, IL 60201

847-328-1966

maps@ritzlin.com

Member ABAA, ILAB


? July 13, 2006

RE: "Phishing"

If a questionable request is received, Microsoft Outlook provides a way of verifying it. Open the message, go to "View", click on "Options", and voila- you will have all the internet headings!

Best-

Helen


. July 03, 2006

re: Editorial about map thief

Dear Bruce,

Bravo on your recent article. It really is quite perfect and it made me feel happy to support your site!

Best,

Carl Sandler


. July 01, 2006

A Bookseller Responds to Whining about Abe and the "Big A's"

Hello,



First, thank you very much for your informative newsletter. I look forward to it.



I've been following the letters about the big 'A's, especially ABE. I've heard enough whining from booksellers.



I am a small bookseller selling on ABE. I am pulling the ABE oxcart, under their lash, which is loaded with my books. I must take my beating because there is no other practical way to transport my books. No matter how much they beat me, I will continue pulling their cart. They know this. I shall not whine about it. I shall be a realist and know that there will be no 'cart-pullers' strike, bookseller's union, or mass exodus or mass anything else, other than the mass whining we now hear. I must pull ABE's cart because they're the biggest cart out there.



All this talk is a bit like the talk about gasoline prices. The price can't get high enough to curtail driving. Everybody knows it, especially the oil companies. You're not going to see any mass parking of cars anytime soon, and you're not going to see any mass movement away from ABE either. They're too big and care only about their bottom line, as they should, and as you should care about yours. One way is to increase prices to pay for the ABE increase. That's something we could all do. It's easy to do and effective, but most dealers think 'Heaven forbid we should ask the consumer to stand part of the cost'.



Another thing professional booksellers need to suspect is that the bulk of 'book dealers' on ABE are not full-time booksellers earning their living from bookselling. Many are 'basement booksellers' with another income and ABE can't flog THEM hard enough to get them to slip out of the harness. They'll keep pulling the cart. Trust me on that one. So all you professional booksellers 'don't make a hill of beans' as Bogart said. When ABE increases their commission to 10 percent, which is surely on the way, they'll not even see a blip in their bottom line. They'll wave the whip and smile all the way to the bank, as they should.



ABE's intent, as is proper, is to make money for ABE owners. They're not going to give up Print on Demand or mulitple listings or anything else that makes them money. No one can fault them for that. What booksellers should do is pass ABE costs on to the consumer.



That's the way things work, folks. Pass the cost on or slip the harness and quit pulling. Above all, quit whining.



Regards,



Bob Benham

Book World

Aurora, Colorado


. July 01, 2006

re: Smiley Map Case

With respect to the decisions in the Smiley case, it is my understanding that all investigational aspects are not yet fully closed. The best place to keep up-to-date on many of the issues involved is, in my opinion, Tony Campbell's ongoing entries at the Map History site, specifically: http://www.maphistory.info/theftlinks.html#smiley.

Regards, Joel Kovarsky


Unstated June 01, 2006

re: William Blake Sale

I am a "William Blake" fan and have been for a long time. Greed, Greed, Greed. The world of "taste", "quality" and honorable love of the arts is falling rapidly by the wayside. What else can you expect from people who truly lack the amenities of life. But in the very end respect for these so called people of culture will be gone.


Bookaday May 04, 2006

Bruce:

We've read your articles regarding e-bay and auctions in general and you have made some interesting and worthwhile observations. We have been selling books online for several years and have only attempted e-bay auctions once, with several Limited Editions Club books in very good condition. In addition, we have been selling antiques and ephemera at shows and markets for a substantial while longer. We have some of our own observations which supplement your own.

First, as to e-bay:
(a)there's entirely too much "stuff" out there and much of it is "trash", and this goes for all merchandise;
(b) we have observed that with e-bay available, everyone fancies themselves a "dealer". Knowledge is not a pre-requisite, just buy cheap and re-sell on e-bay and make your fortune. Alas, if this were so easy we could all be rich.
(c) despite e-bay's attempts to insure that people will treat others fairly and be treated fairly, there are too many horror stories of merchandise arriving and it is not as described and attempting to get your refund is all but impossible or such a hassle that it is not worth the time;
(d) it takes time and effort to correctly list an item and be available to answer all the questions (even stupid ones) that inevitably come up.

I know a retired gentleman who regularly lists on e-bay, but generally can't list more than 15-20 items per week because he has estimated that each item, from start to shipping, usually takes over an hour. Now, as to the effect that all of this has had on the markets (the antique and flea and show market), what we have found is that many customers come to these shows looking for the bargain to list on e-bay and expext to pay $1.29 for everything, then tell you that they have to make a profit. Well! I guess that us dealers only do this as our charitable contribution to society!! We also get the feedback that dealers don't bring "good stuff" to shows and markets because they sell it on e-bay. Nothing is farther from the truth. The dealers who work these shows and markets prefer to deal with knowledgable buyers who can see what they're buying, understand what it is and buy, or, if time permits to deal with a buyer who would like to be educated (and hopefully become a repeat customer) by a knowledgable seller. But with the atmosphere e-bay has created, many items that would be available to knowledgable dealers are no longer so, since they can all be sold on e-bay. That makes it difficult to keep everyone happy.

We occassionally find the middle ground in that we often accept consignments from prospective sellers who do not want to sell at a discounted price to a dealer, yet, are willing to wait for a sale at a price determined by both seller & consigner. That price can be reduced as necessary until, as a last resort, it can always be sent to auction. We refer to auctions as a last resort because the two major factors for a good (meaning successful for a seller) auction are, first, it has to be a decent item and, second, two people have to want it that day. It's easy to get burned at auction and we advise potential clients that unless they need the funds right away, give consignment a try.


. May 03, 2006

Dear Bruce:



This is to show you that I'm actually reading material that comes from Americana Exchange. Slowly but surely I hope to use it more as time goes by. The keyword lookup was extremely helpful on a recent book so I'm beginning to see the value of your efforts.



Just to be somewhat contrary, however, I'm writing this note to comment on your recent editorial with respect to Ebay. I strongly feel that Ebay is the last site that will be helpful to the serious bookseller. For the occasional bookseller it should be most useful but to buy good books you have to pay good money. It doesn't just happen by the luck of the lottery. To sell those books on an economic ongoing regular business basis the chances that one takes by putting books up for sale on Ebay would lead to certain downfall.



It is fine for the masses but when you have to buy books you also have to hold them many times for extended periods of time. There is a very substantial investment in doing so. Oftentimes the recouping of one's investment takes months, even years, and not even the breadth of Ebay's market replaces the unique conditions that surround the sale of good books. That is why Amazon, Alibris, and Abebooks are much closer to the appropriate methodology, as is the use of serious auctions with serious catalogs and research. Who should know this better than the Americana Exchange.



Best regards,



Leigh Stein

Eveleigh Books & Stamps


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1863. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Laurie & Whittle, <i>The Complete East-India Pilot</i>, with 113 maps, London, 1797. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> George W. Browning, 134 sketches of natural history & landscape subjects, American West, 1880s-90s.<br>$4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Catesby & Ehret, <i>Magnolia Grandiflora</i>, from first edition <i>Natural History of Carolina</i>, London, 1731-43. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Petrus Plancius, <i>The Spice Map</i>, hand-colored, London, 1598.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John Miller, <i>Illustratio Systematis Sexualis Linnaei</i>, London, 1770-77. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Thomas Shotter Boys, <i>Original Views of London As It Is</i>, de luxe issue, 26 hand-colored lithographs, London, 1842. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Frederick de Wit, <i>Belgi XVII Provinciarum Tabula</i>, true first state wall map, Amsterdam, ca 1670. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John James Audubon, <i>Passenger Pigeon, Plate LXII</i>, aquatint & engraving before color, London, 1829. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Joannes Clericus, <i>Atlas Atiquus, Sacer, Ecclesiasticus et Profanus</i>, Amsterdam, 1705. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Matthaus Seutter, <i>Atlas Novus sive Tabulae Geographicae totius Orbis</i>, Augsburg, ca 1735.<br>$10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> William Roscoe, <i>Monandrian Plants of the Order Scitamineae</i>, Liverpool, 1824-28. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John James Audubon, <i>The Mocking Bird</i>, hand-colored aquatint & engraving, London, 1827.<br>$7,000 to $10,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CURTIS, EDWARD. <i>Original glass plate photograph, Honovi – Walpi Snake Priest, prepared by Curtis for the printing of The North American Indian</i>, c.1910
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN WEST.), Watkins, Taber, Savage, and others. <i>Magnificent Album of Mammoth Photographs of the American West, with other subjects various</i>, ca. 1865-1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Darwin Family Photograph Album</i>. Down, Kent, 1871-1879
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (SECRET SERVICE). <i>The photographic archive, papers, and relics of William Kennoch, Secret Service Agent</i>. Various places, 1870s and 1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN REVOLUTION). <i>Daguerreotype Portrait of Baltus Stone, the earliest photo of a Revolution veteran,</i> 1846
  • <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [ARTILLERY]. KITCHEN, D.C. <i>Record of the Wyoming Artillerists.</I> Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania: Alvin Day Printer, 1874. $2,000-4,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> UNITED STATES AND MEXICAN BOUNDARY COMMISSION. EMORY, William Hemsley. <i>Report of the United States and Mexican Boundary Survey, Made under the Direction of the Secretary of the Interior…</i><br>$3,000-6,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> RICHARDSON, William H. <i>Journal of William H. Richardson, a Private Soldier in the Campaign of New and Old Mexico…</i>. Baltimore: John H. Woods, 1848. $3,000-6,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> GARCÍA CONDE, Pedro. <i>Carta geografica general de la Republica Mexicana…</i> $30,000-60,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> EMORY, William Hemsley. <i>Map of Texas and the Countries Adjacent: Compiled in the Bureau of the Corps of Topographical Engineers; From the Best Authorities…</i> [Washington, 1844]. $7,500-15,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> THORPE, Thomas Bangs. <i>Our Army at Monterey. Being a Correct Account of the Proceedings and Events which Occurred to the “Army of Occupation”…</i> Philadelphia, 1847. $400-800
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> <i>The Rough and Ready Songster: Embellished with Twenty-Five Splendid Engravings, Illustrative of the American Victories in Mexico…</i> New York; St. Louis, Mo [ca. 1848].<br>$500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> CURRIER, Nathaniel (publisher). <i>The Brilliant Charge of Capt. May At the Battle of Resaca de la Palma (Palm Ravine) 9th of May…</i> $150-300 
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [RINGGOLD, SAMUEL]. WYNNE, James. <i>Memoir of Major Samuel Ringgold, United States Army: Read Before the Maryland Historical Society, April 1st, 1847.</i> Baltimore, 1847. $500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [TAYLOR, ZACHARY]. <i>Life of General Taylor from the Best Authorities.</i> New York: Nafis and Cornish; St. Louis, Mo.: Nafis, Cornish & Co., 1847.<br>$500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> TILDEN, Bryant Parrott, Jr. <i>Notes on the Upper Rio Grande, Explored in the Months of October and November, 1846, on Board the U.S. Steamer Major Brown…</i> Philadelphia, 1847.<br>$5,000-10,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [WORTH, WILLIAM J.]. <i>Life of General Worth; To Which is Added a Sketch of the Life of Brigadier-General Wool.</i> New York: Nafis & Cornish; St. Louis, Mo.: Nafis, Cornish & Co., 1847.<br>$200-400

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