• <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 52. Charles Schulz, Original Peanuts Snoopy Baseball Strip, U.S.A, 1964. Starting price $16,000.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 6.<br>Maurice Sendak (1928-2012), 'Max, Where the Wild Things Are', Pen & Ink, 2012. Starting price $1,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 13.<br>Leo Rijn after Dr. Seuss, Cowfish Maquette, U.S.A, 1998. Signed on stand. Starting price $1,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 17.<br>Dr. Seuss, Untitled, Color Pen & Ink, C. 1940. Signed ‘Dr Seuss’ lower left. Starting price $4,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 19.<br>Dr. Seuss, ‘I wonder how I offended George…’ Pen & Ink, C. 1930. Starting price $7,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 29.<br>Disney Studios, 'Queen, Snow White', Concept Sketch, U.S.A., C. 1937. Starting price $3,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 30.<br>Marc Davis, 'Sleeping Beauty in a Meadow', Production Cel, 1959. Signed. Starting price $1,200.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 50.<br>Charles Schulz, Original Peanuts Daily Strip, USA, 1966. Signed 'Schulz'. Starting price $10,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 58.<br>Chuck Jones, Signed, hand-painted Production Cels from Duck Dodgers, 1952. Starting price $4,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 77.<br>Stan Lee, Marvel Studios, Bishop,<br>X-Men, Production Cel, C.1995. <br>Starting price $240.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 79.<br>Warner Bros, 'New Adventures of Superman', C. 2000. Production Cel. Starting price $300.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 84.<br>Tim Burton, Mayor from Nightmare Before Christmas, C. 1993. Starting price $1,500.00.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph letter signed by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to Senator John William Clark Watson, Richmond, 1865. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph poem by John Quincy Adams from an album kept by Abby Smith, w. inscription signed by her grandfather, John Adams, 1820s. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Typed letter signed by Theodore Roosevelt to assemblyman Michael A. Schapp, New York, 1913. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph letter signed by Richard Wagner to Hofkapellmeister Max Seifriz, Zürich, 1853. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Photograph signed and inscribed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to librettist Paul Collin, 1888. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> <i>Katalog der Wiener Kunstschau</i> signed and inscribed by Egon Schiele, 1916. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Letter signed by Mohandas K. Gandhi to Dr. John Haynes Holmes, Sevagram, 1940. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Photograph signed and inscribed by Marilyn Monroe to Dulce Brito, circa 1957. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Two typed letters signed by William Faulkner, Los Angeles, 1943. $4,000 to $6,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A patriot who fought with George Washington Superb Daguerreotype of Baltus<br>Stone at age 101 (1846).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Edward Curtis portrait of Honovi, Walpi Snake Priest "Honovi was one of the author's principal informants" (1910).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Execution of the Lincoln Assassination Conspirators by Alexander Gardner (1865).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Beecher, Henry Ward Beecher, and the other siblings with their father Lyman Beecher. By Mathew Brady (1850s).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> From Slaves to World-Famous Entertainers Millie-Christine, "The Two-Headed Nightingale" (c. 1868-71)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Goldfield, Nevada Photograph Collection Fabled Western Mining Boomtown (1905-1906)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Tycoon-Collector Benjamin Richardson poses with his great-grandson as appeared in parade.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Alexander Gardner portrait of Lincoln the only known copy, ex-John Hay (1863).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Magnificent Niagara Falls album with a strong provenance (1867).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Spectacular American West Album From Yosemite to Salt Lake City to San Francisco.

Rare Book Monthly

New Letter

Letters to the Editor

. June 01, 2007

Dear Bruce,

It is incredibly saddening to see the closing of libraries in economically disadvantaged counties of Southern Oregon. Fascinating that a whole swath of a Pacific Northwest state has chosen to eviscerate its future because it believed that the Federal Government wouldn't really hang them out to dry.

Of course this is the same state that continually funds its higher education below much poorer states such as Mississippi, and sees no reason for funding a State Police force at less than half of the level they maintained 20 years ago.

Still, they are destroying their future, and that of their children. Maybe they'll wake up, but I doubt it.

Best regards,

Kol Shaver

Anonymous June 01, 2007

re: Roberts' article on UPS

I'm reading this article with great confusion. UPS is United Parcel Service. USPS is United States Postal Service. Either the two are somehow mixed up in the article or the USPS is being referred to as UPS. I'm wondering why an editor didn't catch this. Other than that, it appears to be an excellent article.


Editor's Response

This is a bit confusing and counterintuitive, but what happens is that UPS picks up packages at your location and delivers them to the post office for you. How does this save you money? UPS takes your package to a post office closer to your ultimate shipping address, but charges you less that the post office charges to take it that far. As an illustration, if the post office charges $1 to ship a package within state A, and $3 to ship it from state B to state A, UPS would pick up your package in state B and charge you $1 to ship it to a post office in state A for delivery to your customer. In both cases, the package is ultimately delivered by the post office, but in the first example, you pay $3, but by having UPS carry it part of the way as in the second example, you pay $2. These numbers aren't actual cases, but this is the principle.

. May 05, 2007

Thank you so much for the article about Susan Heller. Though our backgrounds differ, and I'm just a "johnny-come-lately" on the book scene, her current situation is mine. I have specialised in children's books, and trading online only, I have only 4,000 that must go before I retire to my village. Everything is waiting on dispersal of the books.

I haven't moved quickly on them ; I'm off to a book fair shortly, where perhaps I'll find a possible buyer. I think they would fit splendidly into a large bookshop, where they would make an excellent children's section. I think one asset of my books is that they are all listed on a database.

I began business in the US ; then returned home, first to Sydney, then Melbourne. We've seen good days and bad together.

Hoping to have found a solution by June 30 (end of the financial year).

All the best,

Nan Albinski

. May 04, 2007

Dear Bruce,

Thank you very much for your extraordinary coverage, including your filming of the Frank Streeter Sale! It was an especial pleasure for me since I attended at least one part of the sale of Thos. W. Streeter's auction years ago.

With best wishes,
Clare Van Norman

. May 04, 2007

Hi, Bruce -

Thanks for another highly interesting newsletter. Your report on the F.
Streeter auction was beautifully written, and the video was a delight. Not
having been in Christie's auction room since the advent of internet bidding,
I found the addition rather startling. But then, the book biz is rather
startling all around these days.

I won't say that the trade is steeped in despair as yet, but a lot of the
hopefulness is waning. Change is inevitable I guess - good or bad doesn't
matter (and the point of view does when making judgments) - it's still

I think I appreciate your very skillful writing as much as the news and
perceptions that you convey.

My compliments again,


. May 03, 2007

re: Post Offices Changes

Thanks for your comments in Americana Exchange. I think, after 53
years of selling books by mail, that this is a revolutionary point in
the changing of our postal system, no longer an evolutionary one. From
the founding of the postal system until very few years ago, it was
believed with the authors of the Federalist Papers, that an informed
electorate required special treatment in the dissemination of knowledge.
No more. In fact, an informed electorate in today's climate, would be
considered a threat to our leadership.

Donald Hawthorne

Noah's Ark Book Attic

. May 02, 2007

Comment re: Post Office Article


There were a couple major errors in this story.

Media Mail will continue, at an increased price, but
it will continue.

Air M-Bags will also continue, at an increased price
and with no Surface M-Bag service, but Air M-Bag will

Both according to the USPS website:



. May 01, 2007

I enjoyed reading the account of the Frank Streeter auction - one reason for high bidding from the UK of course is surely the weak dollar. A couple of years back the rate was oscillating around $1.60, now it's as good as $2. However, as around 25% of my abebooks sales are to the States, I am not very happy about this!

Best wishes,

Graham Richards

. May 01, 2007

Michael Stillman quite rightly criticises the use of management bollockspeak in his piece on Froogle, but then goes on to say "So far, Google has leveraged its search engine to support advertising."

I'm afraid that I speak only English, and this use of 'leveraged', which appears again further down in the article [and everywhere, in all the financial newspapers] conveys absolutely nothing whatsoever to me.

Keep up the good work.

Chris Baron

Writer's Response: You are absolutely right. I, too, have been reading too many financial newspapers. "Leverage" is a noun, not a verb, despite my attempts to change its nature.

. May 01, 2007

Dear Mr. McKinney,

What an excellent email report boosted by video and so informative. My interest is really modern first editions but I am sure that as I click here and there I will be learning more and more. Keep up the good work.

I run a very different kind of business (selling new and old conjuring-related items to performers all over the world) and I shall take a leaf from your book (no pun intended) by adding video clips in amongst my text..


Inspiring and so well done.

Kind regards,

Martin Breese,
Brighton, UK

. April 04, 2007

Dear Mr McKinney,

I always enjoy the AE monthly newsletter and I do hope that it reaches a wide audience. Subject matter seem to most always be interesting and relevant to the book field at all levels.

This month's write up on the SF Anarchist (?) Fair and the future and relevancy of libraries was especially thought provoking. The video was excellent and I am positive there's a 60 minute documentary in there somewhere, which I leave to you and PBS (or A&E, et al to work out the details). The point is that I'm encouraging more of this. (Yes, I know you've done other videos, which I have enjoyed much. Keep that up!!) Okay, so the perspective of that particular pool of interviewees was skewed, but they always are in one direction or another. Nevertheless, it's important for these voices to be heard and it's instructive for the book world to hear them.

That's it. Just a big thanks and I, for one, would enjoy more of it!

- John Pinkney

Editor's Note: This article may be seen at the following link: Click here.

Anonymous April 02, 2007

Fascinated by article on Memories. Man's ability to record and recall must be one of the factors differentiating him from amoeba. However the ability to use technology is great but the ability to recall is being prejudiced. For instance how many have data stored on CPM data disks and have no means to read them. Even NASA cannot replay many records from the moon shots because of the storage media deterioration and or loss of machines that can read the data. Clay tablets and hard copy print has survived because the media is preservable and man can read. The problems of sorting are soluble - readability and media preservation can be solved if it is tackled now.

On a related topic. Looking at some current computer games and simulators I am struck by their realism but how will future generations differentiate between the truth and simulation?
Thats enough philosophizing for first thing Monday morning.
I enjoy your newsletter.

. April 02, 2007

I very much appreciate your Monthly Newsletter. It is enlightening, the right mix of book, collector and American specific articles.

I haven't bought anything from you...but I keep looking for the right item for my collection.

Great job!

Ed Markiewicz

Editor's note: AE doesn't sell books. We post listings from booksellers in "Books For Sale," and from auctions in the auction search. However, these are all independent sellers and AE is not involved in nor receives commissions from any sale.

. April 01, 2007

re: Memory, the next frontier

Dear Bruce,

It is indeed wonderful that average people can save all kinds of easily accessible information. I concur that the advent of the computer and electronic data storage is as significant as Gutenberg's momentous invention.

But beware: CD's begin to deteriorate in two years. Within 5 years nearly all have some loss of data. (Check this out. I cannot recall exactly where I saw this authoritatively printed.) A direct hit by an airplane, truck, lightning bolt, saboteur, tsunami, or ???? could wipe out trillions of bits of important data on a server. Remote back-ups are vital. Urge everyone to store their valuable data in at least two quite different places. Many server sites do this already. But we should have a routine for assuring ourselves about it.

Love your articles.

Bob Johnson

Robert Johnson

A-J Books

. April 01, 2007

re:Libraries on the Brink: A topic at the Anarchist Book Fair

Tell anyone who reads, the AE is THE source of information monthly.

. March 05, 2007

Dear Bruce,

I read your recent article on Americana Exchange about the set of Bigelow's Botany you bought in New Paltz from an auction of Esther Bensley's possessions. I read that with great interest because I'm the bookseller from whom you bought, via Ebay last month, an old photograph of a graduating class in or around New Paltz. The town name and a photographer name were the only identifiers I could find on the photo's matting. I dated the photo about turn-of-the-century, based on period clothing. And I wondered about the young people in the photo, who they were, and what became of them. For as long as I had it, I thought it an interesting photo.

After reading your article, and learning of your history and knowledge of New Paltz, I'm hoping you can help unravel some of the mystery about the photo. Could Miss Bensley have possible been one of the young students in the photo? Or could she have been their teacher? Any information you could share would be appreciated, just for curiosity's sake.

Thanks for writing that article - I enjoyed it.

Best regards,

Chuck Whiting

Whiting Books

. February 02, 2007

Hello Bruce.

You may not remember me, but we met about 6 months ago at The Seattle Book Fair. My name is Matthew Casey DeLoach. I am the 27 year old young collector and dealer of rare books that you interviewed on the subject of what interests me as a young collector. I enjoyed your recent article and dealer interviews on the same subject. With the increase of amateur sellers on line, one too many online buyers have been burnt by faulty descriptions, inaccurate edition information, and fake signatures. Hence, the new generation of collectors being trigger shy when it comes to dropping big money on line.

It is very next to impossible to stop the wave of change in the collecting market. New collectors are going to continue to buy online and the best a traditional shop keeper can do is learn to master the online method of selling the same way they became masters in the old days. I agree, online shopping can never compare to the experience of treasure hunting in a traditional book shop, nor can one gain the knowledge that talking to long time sellers can provide. This is very sad, but it is an age of convenience. It is much easier to click a mouse from your computer than it is to search the shelves of local bookstores (not to mention the selection is infinitely more extensive). I am very confident that online selling will not hurt the trade, rather, elevate it to a whole new level. We are encountering the same problem with the internet that Gutenberg's Press encountered. Were not the scribes at the time fearful of almost the same thing we're fearful of now? But look at what that invention did for bookselling. The internet should be used as a tool for progress, not as a virus that will eventually kill the industry.

The old expression "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em" comes to mind. The return of the true professional is what the online market needs to reclaim it's glory days of $25,000 book deals. Let the old sellers go online and pave the way for the new generation so the new collector can once again learn to buy with confidence. After all, the net is an unlimited source of information and should not decrease book knowledge, but rather increase it.

With Warm regards,

Matthew C. DeLoach

Editor's Note: The article to which Mr. DeLoach refers, "Where is the new book collector," may be found at this link: Click here.

. February 01, 2007

Dear Michael,

I read Americana Exchange with great interest this morning. Lots of good stuff in there.

With regard to our top 10s, thanks for featuring them...

There seems to be a ceiling as to how much someone will pay for a rare book on AbeBooks. $65,000 is the top price ever. We generate plenty of sales over $1000 on a daily basis. Sales in five-figures are much rarer.

There is, of course, a limit to how much someone will pay on the internet for a book they haven't seen or handled. They may have seen bookseller-provided images but they'd still rather see the book in the flesh if they are considering paying such a substantial sum.

And that's fine - we accept that. We also know that the high-end booksellers list books priced at $100,000 and much, much higher on the site. They know that they're not going to sell them through AbeBooks but it tells collectors out there that they have them. We suspect those high-end listings drive buyers into their showrooms and bookstores. I hope that is the case. We like to think we sometimes play a small role in some major rare book transactions simply because AbeBooks has been used as an advertising medium rather than ecommerce platform.

Anyway, it was a good read this morning.

Several things going on at AbeBooks.com

We have just launched 2 new rooms - one for Science Fiction and one for Fantasy. There's an interview with Barry Levin.



They are aimed at collectors, hardcore sci-fi/Fantasy fans and people with a passing interest in the genres. We get all sorts coming to the site so we're trying to provide something for everyone.

Also we've been previewing the California Book Fair for some time now - http://www.abebooks.com/docs/RareBooks/California-2007.shtml

And we've taken a look at collecting movie scripts - http://www.abebooks.com/docs/RareBooks/movie-scripts.shtml



Richard Davies

PR & Publicity Manager

Editor's Note: The article referred to in this letter may be found at the following link - Abebooks' Top 10

Flo Silver February 01, 2007

Hi Bruce,

The "live" interviews are a wonderful new feature for AE. You are "on top" of the pulse in the out of print book business whether by catalogue, auction, book fairs, and/or internet. We all appreciate the most up to date information on the current trends in this business.

Flo Silver

Flo Silver Books

. February 01, 2007

Hi Bruce,

The video interviews are terrific! I've already watched every
minute. Kudos to all involved, including the booksellers - very
entertaining, informative, and fun!

Hope to see you at the fair!


Ed Hoffman

. February 01, 2007

Your piece wondered about music in silent film (item 26) Silent films were never 'silent'; they always had music, back then played live.



Editor's Note: This comment relates to the February 2007 review of James Pepper's catalogue. Click here.

. February 01, 2007

Just wanted to say how much I enjoyed the interviews.

From a collector's viewpoint I found it really interesting.


Michael Smith

Editor's Note: This comment relates to the interview (including video clips on page 3) "Where is the New Book Collector" in the February 2007 issue of AE Monthly. Click here.

. January 05, 2007

I have been using your free services and appreciate the AE Monthly articles. I read every one. I also especially appreciate the convenience of the upcoming auctions calendar. I just signed up for XE.com on the basis of your recent article. I had been looking for such a foreign exchange aid. I thought that perhaps it was time for me to subscribe...but I really don't need all the resources the expensive subscriptions offer, since I am only a small private collector.. . So I am sending you my gratitude for the information you are sending me, and please let me know if you ever have a sort of "associate" membership.


Elinor Eisemann

Abigale December 06, 2006

I have just received a book for christmas. The problem is, it is very old and I am afraid of it falling apart. I really do not know were to look up such a treasure. Could you give me some info?
Graded Classics Series: Poems and Tales, Poe. Published in 1911. B.F. Johnson Publishing Co. Richmond Virginia.
Any information would greatly be received.


Editor's Response

If your are looking for value, we suggest going to www.abebooks.com and using their Advanced Search to try to find other copies of your book. Abe has the largest number of copies of old books being offered for sale, so there is a good chance your book may be offered by someone. This does not mean that their price is an accurate reflection of value (frequently the asking price is too high), but it may provide a ballpark estimate. In the case of your book, we could not find a match. However, we would not expect a high value for it. First of all, this is a much later printing of some Poe works, evidently meant for school children. Such books rarely are of significant value. B.F. Johnson was evidently an early 20th century southern publisher, and some of their southern history works are of interest and some value. The school books seem less so. There are a number of other of their "graded classics" offered, and generally they bring from a couple of dollars for those in mediocre shape, to low double digits for those in good shape.

. December 03, 2006

AE article on eBay signatures auction prices

I'm a subscriber who enjoys the newsletter quite a bit, and I usually find it very helpful.

Was surprised and disappointed though at the article by Burnham on eBay signatures. I thought it very poorly done -- leaving only a few sentences of warning about fakes. eBay is clearly flooded with both fake signatures and fake COA's to go with them. There should be a great deal of warning -- this article, I think, rather encouraged the sheep to gladly go to the wolves. Not enough is being said anywhere about the rampant dishonestly on eBay, and I think a professional outfit like AE cannot simply touch on eBay lightly like this without dealing with this issue.

There is a great difference between the remaining outlets with professional standards and the "buyer beware" sites -- and AE should clearly stand with the former.

Andrew Halldorson

Sleepy Hollow Bookshops

Editor's Note

We appreciate the heads up on the fraud issues pointed out in this letter and the one which follows. There are some wonderful opportunities on eBay, but it is very much a "buyer beware" forum, and this issue should have been pointed out, including that of phony signatures, COAs, and just about anything else. There are definite advantages to buying from reputable auction houses and dealers, and this security is what one can lose when tracking down deals on eBay.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 14. Darwin, Charles. 1809-1882. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection... 1859.</i>. US$ 60,000-80,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 46. Smith, Adam. 1723-1790. <i>An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations.</i> US$ 70,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 224. CIVIL WAR. Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the War [1865-1866]. US$ 120,000-180,000.
    255 — add to caption: First Edition, Subscriber’s Copy
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 270. Serra, Junipero. 1713-1774, ET AL. Pangua, Francisco. Letter in Spanish, 1775. US$ 60,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 77. Apple 1 Motherboard, with label "Apple Computer 1 / Palo Alto. Ca. Copyright 1976." US$ 300,000-500,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 46. The 1934 Nobel Prize Medal for Physiology or Medicine. Presented to George Minot. US$ 200,000-300,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 39. Darwin, Charles. 1809-1882. Autograph Letter Signed ("Ch. Darwin"). US$ 70,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 4. Lubieniecki, Stanislaw. 1623-1675. <i>[Theatri Cometici pars posterior] Historia Cometarum...</i> US$ 25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 3. Vera rare George III mahogany and engraved brass orrery. US$ 200,000-250,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 163. Stéphane Mallarmé. An autograph manuscript for <i>Un coup de Dés jamais n'abolira le Hasard</i>. [Avril Ou Début MAI 1897]. Est. 500,000-800,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 109. Manet, Edouard - Edgar Allan Poe - Stéphane Mallarmé. <i>Le Corbeau. The Raven. 1875</i>. Est 80,000-120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 152. Edgar Degas. <i>Portrait of Stéphane Mallarmé and Auguste Renoir</i>, [16 Décembre 1895]. Est. 40,000-60,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 15. Baudelaire, Charles. <i>Les Fleurs du Mal. Paris, Poulet-Malassis et De Broise, 1861.</i> <br>Est. 80,000 - 120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 137. Mallarmé, Stéphane. Vers Sur un Galet D'Honfleur. [Eté 1892 OU Été 1894.] Est. 5,000-8,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 48. Gide, André - Maurice Denis. <i>Le Voyage d'Urien. Paris, Librairie de L’Art indépendant, 1893.</i> Est. 20,000-30,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 103. Mallarmé, Stéphane - Edgar Allan Poe. Manuscripts Autographs. [1870-1875 ET 1869]. Est. 80,000-120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 107. [Revue - Stéphane Mallarmé] La Derniere Mode. Gazette du monde et de la famille. Est. 40,000-60,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 110. Mallarmé, Stéphane - Edouard Manet. <i>L’après midi d'un Faune. Églogue. Paris, 1876.</i> Est. 30,000-50,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 160. Mallarmé, Stéphane. Premier état D'un Un Coup De Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard. Manuscrit Autographe. [1897].<br>Est. 60,000-80,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 164. Mallarmé, Stephane. 6 jeux d’épreuves Pour un Coup De Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard De l’édition définitive chez Vollard. Est. 100,000-150,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 198. [Méry Laurent] <i>Liber Amicorum De Méry Laurent</i>. 1875-Fin Des Années 1890]. Est. 50,000-80,000 EUR.

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