• Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
    Pierre Bergé & Associates in Collaboration with Sotheby's, Personal library of Pierre Bergé, <br>11 Dec 2015.
  • Bloomsbury Auctions London, 9th December Western Manuscripts
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 19, Extracts from various authors on demons<br>and demonology, [France, 13th c.] Est.: £3,000-5,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 3, Leaf from an illuminated monastic Missal, [southern Germany, 10th c.]<br>Est.: £3,000–5,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 23, Large cutting from an extremely early <br>copy of Gratian's <i>Decretum</i> [northern France or Low Countries, 12th c.] Est.: £2,000-3,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 47, Christ holding a book and blessing, within a mandorla supported by two angels, [northern France, 11th c.]<br>Est.: £25,000-35,000
    Bloomsbury Auctions London, 9th December Western Manuscripts
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 56, Animal initial with a bear and a griffon,<br>from a monumental illuminated manuscript Bible [France, 12th c.]<br>Est.: £8,000-12,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 57, Animal initial with two dogs, from a monu-<br>mental illuminated manuscript Bible [France, 12th c.] Est.: £7,000-9,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 61, Cutting showing the murder of a youth, [northern France (Paris, 14thc.]<br>Est.: £6,000-8,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 74, Leaf<br>from a finely illuminated manuscript Missal with an almost nude man and two men's heads [Italy, c.1290]<br>Est.: £4,000-6,000
    Bloomsbury Auctions London, 9th December Western Manuscripts
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 105, Fragment of a Sefer Torah (Genesis 28:7-47:3), [Sephard (perhaps c.1300)] Est.: £30,000-50,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 115, Bernard of Botone, <i>Glossa ordinaria</i> on the Decretals of Gregory IX, [Italy, c. 1300] Est.: £30,000-50,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 125, The Hours of Gabrielle d'Estrées, Use of Paris, [northern France, c. 1480]<br>Est.: £8,000-12,000
    Bloomsbury Dec 9: Lot 118,<br> The Astronomical Compendium of San Cristoforo, Turin, including Regiomontanus, Calendarium [northern Italy, (perhaps c. 1474)] Est.: £40,000-60,000
  • <b>Christie's London, December 1: Valuable Books & Manuscripts</b>
    <b>Christie's London Dec 1: </b> Lot 144. BLOCH, Marcus Elieser. [Allgemeine Naturgeschichte der Fische:] 12 parts in 9 volumes, comprising 6 <br>text vols. Est. £40,000-£60,000 .
    <b>Christie's London Dec 1: </b> Lot 77. JOYCE, James (1882-1941). <i>Ulysses</i>. Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1922. Est. £50,000-£80,000.
    <b>Christie's London Dec 1: </b> Lot 1. THE THREE MARYS AT THE SEPULCHRE and THE RESURRECTION OF CHRIST. Est. £150,000-£200,000.
    <b>Christie's London, December 1: Valuable Books & Manuscripts</b>
    <b>Christie's London Dec 1: </b> Lot 164. VALTURIUS, Robertus (1413-84). <br><i>De re militari</i>. Edited by Paulus Ramusius, Junior. Verona... <br>Est. £35,000-£45,000.
    <b>Christie's London Dec 1: </b> Lot 171. [POTTER, Beatrix (1866-1943), illustrator]. Frederic E. WEATHERLY. <i><br>A Happy Pair...Illustrated by H.B.P.</i><br> Est. £5,000-£8,000.
    <b>Christie's London Dec 1: </b> Lot 181. CAO, Junyi (fl. 1644). <i>Tianxia jiubian fenyie renji lucheng quantu.</i><br>Est. £300,000-£500,000.
  • <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 113. EINSTEIN, ALBERT. 1879-1955. Autograph Manuscript Signed<br>("A. Einstein") on final page.<br>US$ 80,000-120,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 10. BURNS, ROBERT. 1759-1796. Autograph Revised Manuscript, <i>Monody on Maria<br>R._________</i> US$ 10,000-15,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 100. WOOLF, VIRGINIA. 1882-1941. Autograph Letter Signed ("AVS"), 4 pp recto and verso, 8vo. US$ 10,000-15,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 28. DICKINSON, EMILY. 1830-1886. Autograph Note Signed ("Emily"). US$ 10,000-15,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 79. REVERE, PAUL. 1735-1818. Autograph Note Signed ("Paul Revere"), 1 p, oblong 16mo. US$ 10,000-15,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 22. DARWIN, CHARLES. 1809-1882. Autograph Letter Signed ("C. Darwin"), 2-1/2 pp, 8vo. US$ 8,000-12,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 58. OYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Autograph Letter Signed ("James Joyce"), December 5, 1920. US$ 8,000-12,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 249. MATISSE, HENRI. 1869-1954. MALLARMÉ, STEPHANE. Poésies. Lausanne: Albert Skira, 1932. US$ 40,000-60,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 229. STOKER, BRAM. 1847-1912. Dracula, 1899. <i>First American edition, inscribed by the author</i>. US$ 12,000-18,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 241. GAUGUIN, PAUL. 1848-1903. [Noa Noa, Vojage de Tahiti. 1893-1894.] US$ 15,000-25,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 233. CHAGALL, MARC. 1887-1985. Poémes. Geneva: Cramer Éditeur, 1968. 124 pp. Poems. US$ 20,000-30,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec 9th: </b> Lot 20. CUMMINGS, EDWARD ESTLIN. 1894-1962. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("E.E. Cummings"), headed "Poem". US$ 5,000-8,000

Rare Book Monthly

New Letter

Letters to the Editor

a October 01, 2015

Michael, thank you for your thought-provoking article on the mold problem in Boston. You're absolutely correct to say that in the digital era, old books just don't seem to warrant proper attention, or the funding necessary to protect this heritage. I have no idea how this dilemma will be solved. It will take dedicated, hard working conservators countless hours over countless years to fix the current state of affairs that libraries and museums across the nation are facing. As a collector, I care for my several hundred items quite carefully. And that makes me think that perhaps these collections don't really belong in moldy old buildings where fewer and fewer people have access to them, but rather they're much better off being in the hands of individuals who know the intrinsic value of these rarities. Thank you for sharing your insight. Scott A. Scanlon Greenwich, Connecticut

Andrew May 06, 2015

I very much enjoyed the conversation with Ed Maggs. I do however need to take mild issue with the statement that "Maggs Bros. Ltd is the oldest continuously operating dealer in rare books and manuscripts in the English speaking world." Henry Sotheran's outdo our good friends in Berkeley Square by 92 years having been in business since 1761.

With best wishes

Andrew McGeachin

Managing Director
Henry Sotheran Limited


George Kolbe December 01, 2014

I look forward every month to reading AE Monthly. Why lessen the enjoyment by including leftist political orthodoxy into otherwise delightful articles.

The latest offender::

"He continued through life to support political candidates who were focused on helping the needy, rather than those who sought to reduce taxes on the wealthy…"

—The Greatest Book Collector Dies at 100

Had the collectors forebears been of like mind, the collection receiving accolades likely would never have been formed.

John November 09, 2012

I am an attorney who has been monitoring this case. Mr. Fraser has not contacted anyone in regard to selling the Mahler photo, as the individual who posted the last message claims. Furthermore, Mr. Fraser's grandmother does not have Alzheimer's disease and any such false claim shows malicious intent. The grandmother's declaration is 100% valid. Lastly, the Fraser family has no intention of giving the photo to the Schoenberg family for free; Mr. Fraser's father is the only one who has made such a statement. Unfortunately, the father has estranged himself from his family for almost a decade and his comments do not reflect the opinions of the Fraser family.

Reader001 November 08, 2012

In response to the letter to the editor regarding the Mahler photograph. I have been following this story since I first saw it. I would like to rebut the statements made by saying that the grandmother is never stated to be suffering from Alzheimer's disease, in no article does it ever make any statement regarding her mental health. This person has been vagrantly slandering them since I read this article on the Huffington post. There is definitely some personal bias there.

I would also like to point out that the father has estranged himself from the family, so if the grandmother gave the photograph as a gift to the grandson, the father would have no claim to it.

If there was truly no right to possession than a suit would have been filed by now. The fact that there is not, means that there is really nothing to go on other than hearsay.

A reader November 01, 2012

I read the Michael Stillman article on the Mahler photograph which was inscribed to Arnold Schoenberg and the situation which legally revolves around the item. As I have been approached by the seller in this case and asked questions and did background research, I would suggest three additional facts be added as fact to this case, which further cloud Mr. Fraser's claim.

 1. His nonengerian Grandmother is suffering from Alzheimers disease.

 2. In the affadavit which he purports to have, he blacks out the name of the notary when he has shown it. I know of two such incidents, one to the Schoenberg Family, the second was reported by the New York Times. Therefore the affadavit is of dubious provenance.

 3. The rest of the family, including the logical heir, his Father, wants the item returned to the Schoenberg family without compensation of any sort.

As the Grandmother is not in a proper state of mind where she can legally give an item of this value away to anyone, it is highly questionable whether Mr. Fraser has any rights to the piece if it were legally his to sell. At this point, the piece will not sell for the price Mr. Fraser seeks, which is well beyond tolerance for any buyer of this sort of material.
I recommend that anyone interesed in this case read the Schoenblog articles. http://schoenblog.com/

 Thank you.

. September 01, 2012

Dear Mr. Stillman,

Re your article on the latest scam, the first indication that this is a scam is the "I am Barrister Willliam" so and so. A barrister in England does one thing only - he argues cases in court, or to put it more formally, before the bar; hence the bar-rister. Mr. Johnson would have been more believable if he had called himself Solicitor so and so. When one has a legal matter in England he engages a solicitor who in turn engages the barrister, if necessary, since the former cannot argue cases before the bar and the latter cannot solicit business.

Just my two cents worth. I enjoy reading the AE Monthly very much.

Best wishes,

scrapslady September 01, 2012

Thank you for all your interesting articles, but particularly those from Susan Halas - always something different and fascinating. By the way, we do get taught about the double negative here in the UK, but what about split infinitives? - Michael Stillman take note!

Mr. Stillman replies:  "But... we fought a revolution here for the right to occasionally split our infinitives!"

mrsmouse July 01, 2012

I am a volunteer sorter of gifts/donations at my library and I can fully appreciate the problem of catching the jewel in the dross. Most volunteers have limited knowledge, (myself included) the library staff hasn't the time, and there we are, sending 1st editions of Noel Coward to the book sale for 1.00, 1st U.S editions of T.S. Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats to the shredder and who on earth knows what else we don't catch. If there is a solution I'd be pleased to hear it.

. April 04, 2012

Hello AE,

 Thanks for another informative article by Susan Halas !

 Dave Shoots, Bookseller

. March 07, 2012

Thank you for the generous mention of my book. Michael Stillman was puzzled by quote
from Richard Burton. I would have liked a puff from the explorer but I don't think
he had much of a sense of humour; in fact my RB is an old friend mentioned in the
book's index - a well known UK architect.

. March 01, 2012

Another great AE Monthly. Can't wait - when's the next one?! Just Kidding.

Thanks much.

. January 04, 2012

Hi Bruce,


I read with sadness your piece on Bob Emerson. I was unaware of his passing but had lost contact with him ever since his move to Ohio. I live not far from Falls Village, Ct. and would often drive to their old church building to search through their books. They were a beautiful and wonderful couple. There was always the aroma of whatever Dorothy was cooking or heating up behind a partition.

This also very well coincides with your article on the loss of old time bookshops and the opportunity to meet "grey-haired mystics, guards and guides." I sorely miss that. I would often spend a weekend driving throughout Ct. New York and Ma. with my booksellers guides seeking out open shops and out of the way booksellers operating out of their homes. Even with them now it has become "by appointment." Nothing these days is spontaneous or adventurous. The Internet has definitely done the world of book collecting a massive disservice which will never be amended.


Best regards,

 Ted Dunn

. January 02, 2012


Keep up the good work.
I enjoy your monthly newsletters throughout the year. My love of books was instilled by my father who worked for Connecticut Printers…. The old Lockwood, Brainard, Day dynasty out of Hartford CT.
Long live the book,

 Caroline Welling VanDeusen

. January 02, 2012

Just wanted to let you know how much i have enjoyed studying the Top 500 auction items list for 2011. It made me remember a lot, ponder a lot, and I learned a lot. Unfortunately, at no point could I say, "Oh, i have one of those!". I greatly appreciate your efforts!

John Via

. December 07, 2011

Dear Bruce:

 Thanks for the nice piece on the Library of America. I am on its board of
trustees, and we appreciate all the advertising we can get.

 Besides reprinting classics, LOA has done a number of anthologies of
material not easily brought together in one place. Two of the most
celebrated are the two-volumes sets devoted to war journalism of World War
II and the Vietnam War.

 An exciting project now underway is an anthology of writing during the Civil
War, which will proceed year by year as the 150th anniversary progresses.
The first volume came out this spring, and the second is on the way.

 All best,


WRAF November 01, 2011

Forwarded the FIRST article to several friends, readers..Never knowing of anyone spending all that time to put together such a challenging task!
Printed out for reading later, I stopped at Monroe..and thought I'd share what I have in my collection..as obviously I like the star.
Have the HIGH SCHOOL YEAR BOOK of Paul Newman..Who's cover has a photo of the building and HIM WALKING ALONG...
Bet a lot of people will now start searching for year books!
Constantly enjoy reading on the first of the month ! Well done !

. October 02, 2011

Hi Bruce,

I just finished reading your review of Part I, “How History…” Swann (my wife Eydie reading over my shoulder said “He writes very well”) and I felt very proud. I am sure that your writing will contribute to people thinking outside of the box and for themselves when it comes to collecting and purchasing in our fascinating field. Americana Exchange has changed the world of collecting printed and manuscript material in a way that is no punches pulled, in your face truths disregarding cliques and “old boy networks” and has evened the playing field for everyone from novices to experts! I return Congratulations to you! There was one startling omission. You failed to note how I look half my age and half my weight!



. October 01, 2011

Dear Bruce

Many thanks for the wonderful article about the Chelsea Book Fair in AE this month and being so supportive of the ABA fairs once again. We already received emails from some UK dealers mentioning the article.

Angelika Elstner

. September 01, 2011

Handwriting matters ... But does cursive matter?

Research shows: the fastest and most legible handwriters avoid cursive. They join
only some letters, not all of them: making the easiest joins, skipping the rest, and
using print-like shapes for those letters whose cursive and printed shapes disagree.
(Citation on request.)

Reading cursive still matters -- this takes just 30 to 60 minutes to learn, and can
be taught to a five- or six-year-old if the child knows how to read. The value of
reading cursive is therefore no justification for writing it.

Remember, too: whatever your elementary school teacher may have been told by her
elementary school teacher, cursive signatures have no special legal validity over
signatures written in any other way. (Don't take my word for this: talk to any

 Yours for better letters,

Kate Gladstone — CEO, Handwriting Repair/Handwriting That Works

Director, the World Handwriting Contest

Co-Designer, BETTER LETTERS handwriting trainer app for iPhone/iPad


Albany, NY

DBuck September 01, 2011

Less than 48 hours after the AP story announcing the discovery of the manuscript, an alleged "autobiography" that proved William T. Phillips was Butch Cassidy, the discoverers recanted everything. Phillips was not Cassidy & the manuscript was a fantasy. The Phillips story had been known and ridiculed for years, by the way. Details here,

  Dan Buck

bkwoman August 05, 2011

To Paul Lister who commented on my article about Shakespeare and Company, thanks for the information. I should have given more information about Sylvia. I was talking about Whitman's tenure and not about when it was Le mistral. Thanks for clearing that up. Karen

. August 01, 2011

re:  Sales Tax

I love how the bookseller with books in the tens of thousands of dollars wants to
increase taxes; especially since he lives in California, where most taxes go to pay
off union pensions. Mr. Stillman obviously does not know what it is like to wonder
whether next month's rent can be paid or if there will be enough food to eat. It is
irrelevant whether he is a Democrat or a Republican. He is a bureaucrat and one that
wishes Big Brother to tax both our souls and our patience. Nor does he seem to
understand that most of the sales through California affiliates come from out of
state and are not subject to tax. Would that he would read his $19,500 copy of the
Celebrated Frog of Calaveras County to realize that his arguments are weighted with
the buckshot of dispassion, with little regard for the common man, who is just
trying to get a jump on tomorrow's bills.

Writer's Response:

1.  Yes I do know what it is like to be short of money. 

2.  I have not taken a position on the issue of sales tax on internet items shipped from out of state. This article reflected a bit more of the ABA position that these should be taxed as last month's article reflected more of the Amazon position that they should not.

3. These out of state sales are already subject to tax in California - a use tax. Few people pay this tax as they are supposed to, but it is on the books.

4.  The issue here is fairness, not whether government taxes too much or too little, or spends too much or too little. The unfairness faced by local merchants who have to collect a sales tax while out of state internet merchants do not, could also be solved by eliminating the sales tax entirely. Californians would have to do with reduced services, or revenue could be raised another way, perhaps though taxes that do not hit people like the letter writer who evidently has limited income. However, the concern expressed for losing this de facto sales tax exemption for out of state sales reinforces the the ABA and local storefront owners objection - that the sales tax advantage for out of staters in driving sales away from local merchants. For Californians, that would mean fewer jobs.  

. July 01, 2011

Ref: Article: Google Books Hearing Postponed

The statement in paragraph two, "It was, rather, a case of it being virtually impossible to locate copyright holders of long out of print books, many of whom are long dead, and the inheritors of these rights unknown and even harder to find" isn't exactly correct. My reference book was published in 1991 and I owned the copyright.

One day while using Google Online Books, I decided to see if my book would be mentioned. Not only was it mentioned but I was able to download up to 50 pages. I then closed the site and went back and was able to download another 50 pages and I was able to continue to do so until I had downloaded the entire 942 pages all for free. The book was selling for $235 at the time. The book is still in print after 19.5 years and now cost $295. My Royalty is 12%.

Back to Google. I wrote Google about this problem with no response. I wrote my publisher and finally the pages were removed. I did not give them permission to put it on their site.

My book was not what they called "long out of print" for it was still in print and fell under the copyright laws. I believe I am still alive and still living in my same home now for 27 years. Google NEVER attempted to locate me. All they needed to do was to put my name "William J. Chamberlin" into their web browser and they would have easily found me.

Now I am having problems with Amazon.com. Naturally they do sell my book. Early this year, I found that they are also selling a Kindle version for over $200. They did not request permission from me to do so. I have not rec'd any royalties from any sales. I wrote them asking them who gave permission to make a Kindle format copy to sell. Their response was to give me the name and address for their lawyer.

So now, we have another company abusing authors.

I don't know what to do about this. Maybe someone who has experience this call help me.

William J. Chamberlin



Giordano June 04, 2011


Odd to read Karen Wright's article on 'Booking it in Europe' where she talks of the Shakespeare and Company bookshop having been started in 1951 by George Whitman.

It was, in fact, opened in 1919 by Sylvia Beach, born in Baltimore,who had arrived in France in 1902 as a fifteen-year-old girl. In the coming months and years, through the shop's doors came, amongst other literary greats, James Joyce, F. Scott Fitgerald and Ernest Hemingway, all of whom regarded it almost as a home from home.

It was Sylvia Beach, of course, who published Joyce's 'Ulysses' in 1922 and sold it from the shop. I don't think Whitman ever could have matched that and, as far as I know, he simply traded on the fame of the original name.

There is a fascinating book by Noel Riley Fitch called 'Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation: a history of literary Paris in the Twenties and Thirties' (first published by Norton, 1983). Well worth reading.

Rare Book Monthly

  • 15 December 2015
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 235. Fleming (Ian). Fine Set of James Bond First Editions. €3500–5000.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 237. Kipling (Rudyard) Attractive First Editions. <i>The Jungle Book</i> and <i>The Second Jungle Book</i>. €800–1400.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 276. Boole (George). The Ones & Zero’s that Changed The World. Boole’s Masterpiece. €5000-7000.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 298. Ussher (James) Britannicum, Ecclesiarum Antiquitates. In Very Fine Binding by Hering of London. €550-750.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 307. Carswell (Robert). Pathological Anatomy - Illustrations of the Elementary Forms of Disease. Important Work with Coloured Plates. €2000-3000.
    15 December 2015
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 355. Stearne (John) M.D. Early Dublin Printing. Oanatoaoria, seu, De Morte Dissertatio. €400-600.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 453. [Webb (John)] ed. An Exceptional Rarity. The Most Noble Antiquity of Great Britain vulgarly... €1500-2000.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 494.<br>Co. Limerick: A broadside poster. <i>Immigration More News About Jamaica!</i> €400-600.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 521. Wright (W.). The Complete Fisher: or the True Art of Angling. €300-400.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 565. JACK B. YEATS. The First Cuala Broadside. The full set of 84 monthly issues, June 1908 to May 1915. €6000-7000.
    15 December 2015
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 573. KING, Richard J. <i>CHILD OF EIRE</i>. A finely-worked original coloured drawing (or cartoon) for a stained glass window. €3000-4000.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 578. BRACKEN, Brendan. An important collection of eleven autograph signed letters to his mother,<br>1920-28. €1750-2500.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 621. Stoker (Bram). <i>Dracula</i>. Very Good Copy, First Edn. 1897. €3500-5000.
    Fonsie Mealy Dec 15th: Lot 781. Rare American Coloured Plate Book. The Iris: An Illuminated Souvenir, for MDCCCLII. €750-1250.
  • Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books, Featuring the Mapping of America
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>William Faden, <i>The North American Atlas</i>, London, 1777.<br>$300,000 to $500,000.
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Jodocus Hondius, <i>Historia Mundi: or Mercator's Atlas</i>, London, 1635. $30,000 to $50,000.
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8: Lewis and Clark, <i>History of the Expedition</i>, first edition,<br>Philadelphia & New York, 1814.<br>$60,000 to $90,000.
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books, Featuring the Mapping of America
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8: John Melish, <i>Map of the United States</i>, engraved folding map, Philadelphia, 1816. $30,000 to $50,000.
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8: Thomas Jefferson, <i>[Between Albemarle Sound and Lake Erie]</i>, engraved folding map, London, 1787. $15,000 to $25,000.
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books, Featuring the Mapping of America
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8: Mark Catesby, 31 hand-colored engraved plates from <i>The Natural History of Carolina</i>, first edition, London, 1731-46. $12,000 to $18,000.
    Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8: Peter van den Keere, <i>Germania Inferior</i>, leather-bound folio, Amsterdam, 1617. $12,000 to $18,000.
  • Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Davies, John, of Hereford. <i>Wittes Pilgrimage</i>. London, [1605?]. $10,000-15,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Rowley, Samuel. <i>When you See Me, You know Mee</i>. London, 1632. $3,000-5,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: <br>Ariosto, Lodovico (John Harington, trans.). <i>Orlando Furioso in English Heroical Verse</i>. (London, 1591). $90,000-120,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Marlowe, Christopher. <i>The Famous Tragedy of the Rich Jew of Malta</i>. London, 1633. $40,000-60,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Caius, Joannes. <i>Of Englishe Dogges</i>. London, 1576. $30,000-50,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan, <i>Or The Matter, Forme, & Power of a Common-Wealth</i>. London, 1651. $25,000-35,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Missal, Use of Sarum. <i>Missale ad usu[m] insignis ac preclare ecclesie Sar[um]</i>. London, [1512]. $15,000-20,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Bacon, Sir Francis. <i>Instauratio Magna [Novum Organum]</i>. London, 1620. <br>$20,000-30,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Walton, Izaak. <i>The Compleat Angler or the Contemplative man's Recreation</i>. London, 1653. $70,000-100,000
    Sotheby's NY December 2-4:<br>Milton, John. <i>Poems</i>. London, 1645. $25,000-35,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Baldwin, William. <i>A Myrroure for Magistrates</i>. London, 1559. $100,000-$150,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Newton, Isaac. <i>Opticks</i>. London, 1704. Presentation copy given by the author to Edmund Halley. $400,000-600,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Shakespeare, William. <i>Poems</i>. London, 1640. $150,000-200,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Chaucer, Geoffrey. <i>Canterbury Tales</i>. London, 1526. $200,000-$300,000
    Sotheby's NY Dec 2-4: Donne, John. Autograph letter signed to Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, presenting a first edition of <i>Pseudo-Martyr</i>, London, 1610. $150,000-200,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A patriot who fought with George Washington Superb Daguerreotype of Baltus<br>Stone at age 101 (1846).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Edward Curtis portrait of Honovi, Walpi Snake Priest "Honovi was one of the author's principal informants" (1910).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Execution of the Lincoln Assassination Conspirators by Alexander Gardner (1865).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Beecher, Henry Ward Beecher, and the other siblings with their father Lyman Beecher. By Mathew Brady (1850s).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> From Slaves to World-Famous Entertainers Millie-Christine, "The Two-Headed Nightingale" (c. 1868-71)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Goldfield, Nevada Photograph Collection Fabled Western Mining Boomtown (1905-1906)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Tycoon-Collector Benjamin Richardson poses with his great-grandson as appeared in parade.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Alexander Gardner portrait of Lincoln the only known copy, ex-John Hay (1863).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Magnificent Niagara Falls album with a strong provenance (1867).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Spectacular American West Album From Yosemite to Salt Lake City to San Francisco.

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