Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - February - 2014 Issue

American Autographed Documents from Joe Rubinfine

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American historical documents.

Joe Rubinfine has issued List 174 of American Historical Autographs. This is a collection of documents, occasionally a small form but mostly larger papers, including handwritten letters, from important personalities in American history. Some come from the height of their powers or significance, others from the days before they were well-known, or after their retirement from notable positions. Personal documents give us great insight into the personalities of those we otherwise know only from third-party accounts, often distorted by the opinions of those outsiders. These documents often provide a look into the hearts and minds of those who may have become icons, but were once real people like the rest of us. Here are a few of these documents.

 

We will start with an amazing letter from one of America's best known soldiers, though more for the wrong reason than the right. George Armstrong Custer will always be remembered for his final defeat because it was so thorough. Neither he nor any of his men survived his one-sided loss in the Battle of Little Big Horn. His reputation was ruined, but his loyal wife, Elizabeth Custer, spent the remaining 57 years of her life rehabilitating the honor of her late husband. General Custer was hardly a great soldier, and his ego a bit oversized, but one thing that cannot be doubted about the General and his wife was the truly devoted love they held for each other. This was a love story few could match. If there is any doubt that Gen. Custer shared the love for Elizabeth that she displayed towards him in her 57 years of widowhood, that should be dispelled by this letter. Item 10 is a letter from Custer to his wife dated January 14, 1869, from Fort Cobb (now Fort Sill) Oklahoma, to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. It is addressed to “Darling of all the World.” The letter is 39 pages in length. Seriously. Try tweeting or texting that! Obviously, Custer has lots to say. He talks about his brother's loneliness and tendency to drown his sorrows in alcohol. He speaks highly of a newly arrived subordinate, Major Marcus Reno, who would be a major figure in the story of the disaster at Little Big Horn, blamed by many for not providing Custer sufficient support when things went wrong. Others involved in that tragic battle also appear in this letter. Still, what stands out is the enormous affection Custer expresses for his wife. He talks of retrieving the mail late at night because he knew there would be a dozen letters from Elizabeth, and sure enough, his estimate was precisely correct. He received an even dozen from the “Queen of Women.” Custer writes, “...there is a little woman...who can lead her boy whither she chooses...to her will I am ready a slave...they may take the Battle of the Washita and all the renown I have reaped from it – if I can only be permitted to go to you and there remain.” Priced at $100,000.

 

Here is an ironic item that relates to a forgotten event that changed American history in ways that are incalculable yet will forever be unknown. Item 28 is an official appointment from 1865 by President Andrew Johnson, appointing Hannibal Hamlin as Customs Collector in Boston. The appointment of Hamlin to such a minor post, that served more as a source of income than an important role in government, is unusual. At the start of the year, Hamlin was Vice-President of the United States. Indeed, it was Johnson who had replaced him in that office. President Lincoln had agreed to replace Hamlin with Johnson, not because of any problems with Hamlin, but for political advantage. Hamlin was an anti-slavery Republican from Maine, a constituency Lincoln felt confident in holding in what looked like a very challenging reelection campaign at the time of his nomination. Johnson was a “War Democrat,” a loyal union supporter but otherwise more appealing to less radical and more southern oriented constituencies. Lincoln made the switch for practical political reasons, and Hamlin loyally supported his reelection. Of course, no one could have anticipated what would happen. Lincoln was assassinated, and because of the political switch, it was the new vice-president, Johnson, who succeeded him, rather than Hamlin. His more moderate, sympathetic views toward the South, which almost got him removed from office, were undoubtedly very different from the approach Hamlin would have taken. American history would have turned out differently, though no one can say just how. Johnson likely felt he owed something to Hamlin in making this appointment. However, the latter would resign from this post a year later in protest of Johnson's policies, and returned to the senate in 1868, serving until 1880. Amazingly enough, Hamlin, who died in 1891, outlived the next six vice-presidents who succeeded him in office. $4,500.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books<br>Fine Art<br>Antique Engravings & Lithographs<br>Works on Paper<br>Accepting bids until July 31</b>
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Cleveley, Jukes, & Cook - View of Charlotte Sound, New Zealand. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Peron - Platypus. $300 to $600.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Loon & Pitt - Map of the World published 1680 - <I>Orbis Terrarum nova et accuratissima tabula.</i> $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Maitres de l'Affiche by MUCHA - La Dame aux Camelias. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <center><b>Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books<br>Fine Art<br>Antique Engravings & Lithographs<br>Works on Paper<br>Accepting bids until July 31</b>
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Cause - Peony, Crocus, Dog's Tooth Violet. $400 to $800.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Redoute, Folio - Lemmonnier's Iris - Iris Monnieri. $2,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Audubon, Imperial Folio - Common American Deer. $6,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Gould - Cuvier's Toucan (Ramphastos Cuvieri). $5,000 to $8,000.
  • <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> OUTHWAITE, Ida Rentoul. FROG TEACHER LEADING ELF PUPILS ... Watercolour, c.1920.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> SATO, Gyro. [GENDAI RYOKI SENTAN ZUKAN]. Tokyo : Shinchosa, 1931.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> CARROLL, Lewis. ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND. London : Macmillan and Co., 1868.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> FLEMING, Ian and MILLER, Albert. CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG. New York : Random House, 1968.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> PHOENIX. Adelaide : Adelaide University Union, 1939.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> BOWEN, Emmanuel. A complete map of the Southern Continent. London : 1744.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> NORTHFIELD, James. AUSTRALIA. Melbourne : Northfield Studios and J.E. Hackett, c.1935
  • <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> SHAKESPEARE, William. <i>Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Published according to the true originall copies.</i> London, Tho Cotes, for Robert Allot, 1632.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> STAHL, Augusto. <i>Panorama of Rio de Janiero.</i> c.1859. 3-part albumen print panorama (266 x 1186mm.).
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> WILDE, Oscar. <i>Lady Windermere's Fan</i>. London: Elkin Mathews & John Lane, 1893. Presentation copy.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> DE TOCQUEVILLE, Alexis. <i>De la Democratie en Amerique.</i> Paris: Pagnerre, 1850. Thirteenth Edition. Presentation copy.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> CHAUDRON, A[delaide] de V[endel]. <i>Chaudron’s Spelling Book.</i> Mobile (AL): S.H. Goetzel, 1865.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> SAINT CHER, Hugh of. <i>Commentary on Peter Lombard’s Sentences, with the Abridgement of the Sentences.</i> Eastern France, illuminated manuscript., first half of the fifteenth century.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> LANE, Thomas. <i>The Crystal Palace.</i> London, 1851.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> B[ULWER], J[ohn]. <i>Anthropometamorphosis: man transform’d: or, the artificiall changling historically presented…</i> London: William Hunt, 1653.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> VOLTAIRE, François-Marie Arouet de. <i>Oeuvres de M. de Voltaire.</i> Dresden, George-Conrad Walther (i.e. Leipzig, Breitkopf), 1748-1750.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> HAWKING, Stephen & Leonard Mlodinow. <i>The Grand Design.</i> London: Bantam Books, 2011.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> FIELDS, James T. <i>Yesterdays with Authors.</i> With fine manuscript letter by Charles Dickens, and autograph letters from Forster, Landor, Mitford and others.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> <i>Kit, the Arkansas Traveller Broadside.</i> Chromolithograph.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Charles Loupot, <i>Les Cigarettes Mekka,</i> 1919. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Plinio Codognato, <i>Cicli Fiat,</i> circa 1910. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> L.N. Britton, <i>Warning! Consider the Possible Consequences,</i> c. 1917. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Leonardo Bistolfi, <i>Première Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs Modernes,</i> 1902. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Leonetto Cappiello, <i>Paquet Pernot / Biscuits Pernot,</i> 1910. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jul 15:</b> Jessie Tarbox Beals, archive of signed photographs, 15 silver prints, c. 1930. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Francesco Nonni, <i>Font Meo / Acqua Minerale Naturale,</i> 1924. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Frederick Winthrop Ramsdell, <i>American Crescent Cycles,</i> 1899. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> <i>Be a Tight Wad! Own Something!</i> designer unknown, 1925. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Candido Aragonese de Faria, <i>Chamonix–Mont–Blanc,</i> c. 1910. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> W.E.J., <i>Irishmen Avenge the Lusitania,</i> c. 1915. $2,000 to $3,000.
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Your Own Sylvia:<br>Sylvia Plath’s letters to Ted Hughes and other items,<br>Property of Frieda Hughes<br>9 to 21 July 2021</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Family photograph album ("The Hughes family Album"), 1957-1962. £30,000 to £50,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Typed letter signed, to Ted Hughes, on "my own private doctrine", with a poem, 5 October 1956. £15,000 to £20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Pen and ink portrait of Ted Hughes, [1956]. £10,000 to £15,000.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Your Own Sylvia:<br>Sylvia Plath’s letters to Ted Hughes and other items,<br>Property of Frieda Hughes<br>9 to 21 July 2021</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. Joint autograph letter signed, to William and Edith Hughes, March 1960. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes. Photographic portrait by David Bailey, inscribed by Plath, 1961, and another press photo. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Tarot de Marseille. Deck of cards owned by Sylvia Plath. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes. Pair of gold wedding rings. £6,000 to £8,000.

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