• <b>Bonhams: The Medical & Scientific Library of W. Bruce Fye. New York, March 11, 2019</b>
    <b>Bonhams NY, Mar 11:</b> VESALIUS, ANDREAS. 1514-1564. <i>De humani corporis fabrica libri septem.</i> Basel: Johannes Oporinus, June 1543. $300,000 to $500,000
    <b>Bonhams NY, Mar 11:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. 1578-1657. <i>De motu cordis & sanguinis in animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Leiden: Joannis Maire, 1639. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Bonhams NY, Mar 11:</b> BERENGARIO DA CARPI, GIACOMO. 1460-1530. <i>Isagogae breves perlucide ac uberrimae in Anatomiam humani corporis.</i> Bologna: Benedictus Hectoris, 15 July 1523. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Bonhams NY, Mar 11:</b> FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN. 1706-1790. <i>Experiments and Observations on Electricity, made at Philadelphia in America…</i> London, 1769. $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Bonhams NY, Mar 11:</b> BENIVIENI, ANTONIO. 1443-1502. <i>De abditis nonnullis ac mirandis morborum et sanationum causis.</i>Florence: Filippo Giunta, 1507. $8,000 to $12,000
  • <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Fine Illustrated Books. 50 illustrated works across a range of subjects.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Present Perfect. Books & works on paper including Literature, Children’s & Illustrated, Sports & Pastimes, Modern Prints and more.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> The House of Romanov, marking the centenary of the tragic demise of the Romanov dynasty.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> CHAGALL & GOGOL. Les âmes mortes, 1948. Chagall’s first major illustrated book.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> GUSTAV KLIMT, eine nachlese, 1931. An important early monograph on Klimt.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> ELLIOT. Birds of North America, 1866. One of 200 2 vols sets, folio.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> PURCHAS. His Pilgrimes/Pilgrimage, 1625-26. 5 vols. Probably the greatest collection of voyages ever published.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> HUXLEY. Brave New World, 1932. Exceptionally fine first edition.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> KELMSCOTT PRESS. Poems of Shakespeare, one of 500, publisher’s vellum.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> LEROUX. Phantom of the Opera, 1911. First UK edition in fine S&S binding.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> INDIANA, Robert. The American Dream, one of 30 AP copies, 30 screen prints.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> BENOIS. Tsarskoe Selo during the Reign of Elizaveta Petrovna, St Petersburg, 1910. Deluxe issue.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> CORONATION ALBUM. Description du sacre et du couronnement de leurs Majestés Impériales, 1883. One of 200.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> IMPERIAL FAMILY. Signed original photograph of Tsar Nicholas II’s 4 daughters.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Souvenir du Couronnement de Leurs Majestés Imperiales a Moscou, 1896.
  • <b>Bunch Auctions: Rare Books & Fine Prints. January 22, 2019</b>
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> Dickens, Charles. <i>A Tale of Two Cities,</i> first edition with inclusions. $18,000 to $26,000
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> John James Audubon. A la poupee color engraving on paper "Stanley Hawk." $6,000 to $12,000
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> [FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE] Dickens, Charles. <i>Oliver Twist</i>, London, 1838. 3 vols. $8,000 to $10,000
    <b>Bunch Auctions: Rare Books & Fine Prints. January 22, 2019</b>
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> Land indenture between William Penn and Thomas Gell, dated October 12, 1681, wherein Gell purchased 500 acres Pennsylvania farmland; signed by Penn. $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> Thomas Hart Benton, lithograph on paper "The Woodpile", pencil signed, original AAA certificate. $1,500 to $2,500
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> Helen Dryden, <i>Vogue</i> cover design lithograph completed in hand watercolor, proof design for September 1922 issue. $600 to $800
    <b>Bunch Auctions: Rare Books & Fine Prints. January 22, 2019</b>
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> Fisher, John D. <i>Description of the Distinct, Confluent, and Inoculated Small Pox, Varioloid Disease, Cow Pox, and Chicken Pox,</i> Boston, 1829. $600 to $800
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> [Rare Dust Jacket] Crane, Stephen. <i>The Red Badge of Courage,</i> NY, 1896. $500 to $700
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> after Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1884-1920), chromolithograph on paper "Lunia Czechowska", signed in plate, artist's proof (A/P). $200 to $400
    <b>Bunch Auctions, Jan 22:</b> Samuel Arlent Edwards, color mezzotint on paper "A Visit to the Boarding School", pencil signed. $100 to $200
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>

Rare Book Monthly

New Letter

Letters to the Editor

Unstated June 01, 2006

re: William Blake Sale

I am a "William Blake" fan and have been for a long time. Greed, Greed, Greed. The world of "taste", "quality" and honorable love of the arts is falling rapidly by the wayside. What else can you expect from people who truly lack the amenities of life. But in the very end respect for these so called people of culture will be gone.


Bookaday May 04, 2006

Bruce:

We've read your articles regarding e-bay and auctions in general and you have made some interesting and worthwhile observations. We have been selling books online for several years and have only attempted e-bay auctions once, with several Limited Editions Club books in very good condition. In addition, we have been selling antiques and ephemera at shows and markets for a substantial while longer. We have some of our own observations which supplement your own.

First, as to e-bay:
(a)there's entirely too much "stuff" out there and much of it is "trash", and this goes for all merchandise;
(b) we have observed that with e-bay available, everyone fancies themselves a "dealer". Knowledge is not a pre-requisite, just buy cheap and re-sell on e-bay and make your fortune. Alas, if this were so easy we could all be rich.
(c) despite e-bay's attempts to insure that people will treat others fairly and be treated fairly, there are too many horror stories of merchandise arriving and it is not as described and attempting to get your refund is all but impossible or such a hassle that it is not worth the time;
(d) it takes time and effort to correctly list an item and be available to answer all the questions (even stupid ones) that inevitably come up.

I know a retired gentleman who regularly lists on e-bay, but generally can't list more than 15-20 items per week because he has estimated that each item, from start to shipping, usually takes over an hour. Now, as to the effect that all of this has had on the markets (the antique and flea and show market), what we have found is that many customers come to these shows looking for the bargain to list on e-bay and expext to pay $1.29 for everything, then tell you that they have to make a profit. Well! I guess that us dealers only do this as our charitable contribution to society!! We also get the feedback that dealers don't bring "good stuff" to shows and markets because they sell it on e-bay. Nothing is farther from the truth. The dealers who work these shows and markets prefer to deal with knowledgable buyers who can see what they're buying, understand what it is and buy, or, if time permits to deal with a buyer who would like to be educated (and hopefully become a repeat customer) by a knowledgable seller. But with the atmosphere e-bay has created, many items that would be available to knowledgable dealers are no longer so, since they can all be sold on e-bay. That makes it difficult to keep everyone happy.

We occassionally find the middle ground in that we often accept consignments from prospective sellers who do not want to sell at a discounted price to a dealer, yet, are willing to wait for a sale at a price determined by both seller & consigner. That price can be reduced as necessary until, as a last resort, it can always be sent to auction. We refer to auctions as a last resort because the two major factors for a good (meaning successful for a seller) auction are, first, it has to be a decent item and, second, two people have to want it that day. It's easy to get burned at auction and we advise potential clients that unless they need the funds right away, give consignment a try.


. May 03, 2006

Dear Bruce:



This is to show you that I'm actually reading material that comes from Americana Exchange. Slowly but surely I hope to use it more as time goes by. The keyword lookup was extremely helpful on a recent book so I'm beginning to see the value of your efforts.



Just to be somewhat contrary, however, I'm writing this note to comment on your recent editorial with respect to Ebay. I strongly feel that Ebay is the last site that will be helpful to the serious bookseller. For the occasional bookseller it should be most useful but to buy good books you have to pay good money. It doesn't just happen by the luck of the lottery. To sell those books on an economic ongoing regular business basis the chances that one takes by putting books up for sale on Ebay would lead to certain downfall.



It is fine for the masses but when you have to buy books you also have to hold them many times for extended periods of time. There is a very substantial investment in doing so. Oftentimes the recouping of one's investment takes months, even years, and not even the breadth of Ebay's market replaces the unique conditions that surround the sale of good books. That is why Amazon, Alibris, and Abebooks are much closer to the appropriate methodology, as is the use of serious auctions with serious catalogs and research. Who should know this better than the Americana Exchange.



Best regards,



Leigh Stein

Eveleigh Books & Stamps


buzzard509 May 02, 2006

I find eBay an excellent source for both buying and selling rare books. I bid about 100 items a week and win about 10% of the time but when I do win I get a great bargin. Most of the items I win I end up reselling on ebay at a big profit mostly because the previous seller was a novice or an idiot. It is pretty easy to buy items off abebooks and sell them on eBay for big profits if you are paying attention.

buzzard59


. May 01, 2006

I have to say that I thought your two articles discussing ebay in the scheme of used/rare book selling were very well done and very much on point. My experience has been along the lines you suggest. I have a website and biblio.com listing but mainly sell on ebay. I did want to note however that selling prices on ebay are not always lower than fixed price sites -- I have found that a significant number of buyers on ebay do not apparently consult fixed price listing venues, and sometimes material that is lower priced on abe for example will achieve high numbers of bids and higher prices on ebay. This creates an excellent resale opportunity for those who track ebay selling prices. Many strange things in particular turn up in the slightly over $100 category, often material that is very recently published but already uncommon.

AE Monthly is terrific and I always look forward to reading it!

Rebekah Bartlett, Coelacanth Books

www.coelacanthbks.com


. May 01, 2006

I wanted to thank you always for providing such a wonderful 'newsletter'! I glean a LOT of information on bookselling venues and more from each month's issue and do appreciate that it's FREE!!!!

With all the book selling sites, gouging us booksellers any way they can, it is refreshing to read all the 'truth' in YOUR articles and for FREE!

Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

Ms. Mickey Kaz

booksr4u. net


. May 01, 2006

EBAY:

A few notes from a bookdealer's view

Just read Bruce McKinney's story, and wanted to comment.
I am a Dutch bookdealer, and have never sold through Ebay.
I find that as a specialized bookdealer (natural history, science, travel) I do best when I sell through internet PDF catalogues (a few printed ones for special customers) and offering books to my clients. Besides I am not dealing with ABE because they are a hassle (money and time wise). I put my inventory through Antiqbook (a Dutch company) on the net. And through them (and AddAll, Bookfinder etc.) I make enough extra sales and find new clients to send catalogues to. This works well for me.

I sometimes buy from Ebay but you have to remember that:

* It is a lot of trouble going through a lot of junk books to find a few good ones that often will be sold to others. I only have a quick look from time to time to see if there are a few highlights.

* You mostly buy what you can get (as on most auctions), not what you are looking for (the great strength of listing sites is the tremendous choice they have).

* McKinney states that many collectors (or their families) will sell through Ebay. I don't think so. My experience is that many of the better books are sold by dealers and bought by dealers! These will sell, and as always the great majority of the ''junk'' books will remain unsold or will go for a price I would not bother to pack and send a book for.
Except for a few exceptions families will not sell through Ebay. A few will find it fun and perhaps become booksellers. Most of the families want to get rid of it and do not want to do tiresome deals with loads of individual books and at the end find that half remains unsold.

* Several ''interesting looking books'' are going for more money than they are worth. If these (I presume) private customers would be checking the listing sites AddAll or Bookfinder they would find these books at lower prices!

* I am thinking of selling a few (suitable) items through Ebay, but it will remain a marginal ''sellingtool'' for me.

Hermann Strack

(Natural History / Science / Travel Books)


. May 01, 2006

Mr. McKinney,

Excellent advice regarding selling books on eBay but you missed one new and important aspect: PayPal's miserable new "protection policy" that forces sellers to send international orders by very expensive Global Express Mail.

Any buyer can claim not to have received his or her shipment and, unless the seller can give PayPal an online tracking number, will receive an instant full refund (and the seller a chargeback).

Global Priority does not offer online tracking. USPS's only offering with international tracking is Global Express Mail.

I sold something to an Italian buyer who would pay only for surface shipment (six weeks); he complained to PayPal seven days later that he had not received the item. Despite the circumstances PayPal immediately charged me back for the full amount and the buyer never answered another email.

So, you might answer, that's what feedback is for. You might address the issues of "feedbcak" and PayPal some time: If you give bad feedback, regardless of the circumstances, you receive bad feedback. None of us wants to hazard our "on line reputation" and feedback score, so we just bite the bullet and put the deadbeat on our "do not accept bids" list.

The advise from PayPal and eBay is to accept the risk as part of the cost of doing business. That's ok for Mr. Macy but it doesn't work out for a retired guy selling something for a hundred bucks on eBay.

Thanks again for your article. I've copied it and will give it to friends who ask for help getting started on eBay. I'll also look a little more deeply into your offering. I've ignored past emails but you certainly appear to be offering worthwhile advise.

Dan MacMurray


. April 04, 2006

re: Abe

ABE wants to profit as a bookselling business when it is only a Listing Service.

Booksellers buy inventory, expertise and grade their books, list and photograph them, process the order and ship the merchandise.

ABE is involved only in advertising, and now in credit card processing at a steep fee.

ABE service to book dealers has diminished, as well as order revenue. Anyone can pay the fees and sell on ABE, so inexpert and wrong descriptions not only plague buyers, but reduce the veracity of sellers and their product.

I sell first edition collectable books and I liked ABE very much once. Fees have dramatically increased with no increase in service. Your statistic of perhaps 8% selling is in line with complaints of my colleagues.

We are all waiting for a new competitor to ABE so professional booksellers can switch from a once respected listing service, to a company better run and less greedy. I have severely diminished my listings on ABE, and income is the same, perhaps even better.

Joe Linzalone,
Wolfshead Gallery


. April 02, 2006

re: Review of McBride's E-First Editions

In all the years we have been publishing A Pocket Guide to the Identification of First Editions and, lately, the Electronic version EFEG, we have been the subject of many a review. Without exception, every reviewer made some major error or a collection of minor ones that add up to the same thing, rendering the review welcomed, but one that, when reading it, prompted shouts of "No, no, no!" or "Well, not exactly!" or "There's more to it than that . . . ".

Until now.

Ms Roberts has struck fire where others have merely made a few sparks. She got it right.

And we thank her.

Best,

Bill McBride


Editor's Note:

Renee Magriel Roberts' review of McBride's E-First Edition Guide may be found at the following link: Click here.


N.Richards April 02, 2006

Abe/Alibris Comparison

We read your ABE article with much interest. We do business with both ABE and Alibris.

ABE is a listing service. Alibris is a book buyer and reseller. The difference between the two is the same as the difference between the newspaper that advertises your car and the customer that actually buys it. The two are worlds apart. It's astounding how few booksellers understand this.

The ABE self-justification scenario has become a frequent topic of discussion in our bookshop. Part of what we find troubling is that the majority of booksellers appear to know so little about Alibris - such as their exceptional fraud-detection system and protection policies.

Did you know that most of Alibris' bogus orders are caught before they're even captured? Did you know they have entire computer systems in place dedicated to nothing but preventing fraud? Did you know that even if a bogus order somehow manages to make it through all their safeguards, the bookseller is never liable for a chargeback?

Unlike ABE, Alibris IS the end customer. They take title to the book. They OWN it. They have a vested interest in preventing fraud, because it costs THEM money.

If a book is shipped after the fraud is detected, the bookseller is still out nothing. Alibris either absorbs the cost or, if the book was shipped directly to them, they put the book in their Sparks warehouse for resale (an amazing operation, by the way). Either way, the bookseller is protected.

The sad thing is, practically no one knows any of this because they never see it. Alibris insulates booksellers from fraudulent orders. The majority of booksellers just go on about their business, oblivious to it all. It doesn't get much better than that.

Whatever ABE may claim they are about to begin doing regarding fraud, Alibris has already been doing for years. From where we sit, they do it better than anyone in the industry.

But as good as Alibris is at anti-fraud, they are utterly ham-handed at self promotion. Their PR is near-legendary, among the worst ever seen. Alibris' idea of "news" comes across as self-congratulatory, xenophobic rhetoric. At times it has been borderline nauseating to read.

Such as it is. Most of the time, they keep a low profile and just do their jobs. I suppose we respect that. Perhaps it's no surprise that Alibris doesn't regard fraud protection as being of much interest to booksellers. From their perspective, it's an in-house issue.

As for ABE, reading their new terms closely, one realizes that they will "protect" the bookseller only under certain circumstances and in accordance with the reams of legalese that characterize their every move. Sadly, they have become a model of sleaze.

If you're selling books through ABE and making money, great! Stay there! But don't kid yourself, they are no longer the company Rick Pura founded. For booksellers who smugly tout their historical lack of chargebacks, congratulations! You're in the minority. You can feel good about your freedom from crooks. Just pray it never happens to you, because you'll discover to your horror that, as far as the credit card companies go, YOU LOSE. Period. End of story.

Most merchants have experienced chargebacks in their businesses and some have had horrible experiences with orders from places like Nigeria, Indonesia and others. And, the frequency of fraudulent US- and Canadian-based orders is not going down, it's going UP. A few Google searches reveal how big a problem it is. USA Today just did a big story on online fraud. The article said less than 10% of all companies really have their acts together to counter fraud.

But don't expect ABE to be any kind of magic bullet. ABE has protected themselves, not you. The CEO interviewed in USA Today said, "A company has to be completely prepared to deal with fraud. Halfway measures won't cut it." ABE is not prepared - not by a long shot.

We'll be leaving ABE as of May 1. Never thought we'd say so, but we're not sorry to go. They were great during the "Golden Age" but those days are gone.

Just to be clear: We do not work for Alibris, we have no agenda, we have no involvement with Alibris in any way, other than they buy our books and we once visited them. Faults notwithstanding, they do their jobs well and it's high time someone said so. Our orders are steadily increasing over time and that makes us smile on payday.

There was a time we could say the same about ABE. Not any more.

-Nathan & Company


. April 01, 2006

Re: Book Decor

Unfortunately, this is not new. Thirty years ago I had an open shop in a small NH town, and we regularly had decorators come in looking for fancy bindings and decorative spines. It took a while before anyone told me what would become of these treasures - they would be glued together and run though a saw to a depth of 2-3 inches Then shelving didn't have to be so deep and take so much space out of the room. The more things change, the more they stay the same. Sorry to hear about this.


. April 01, 2006

Hi:

I share your gut reaction to buying books by the foot, or "books for looks." The following notions might help:

1. We can pity those who don't read. Perhaps their situation will be improved by the mere proximity to books. Perhaps the buyers or a guest will absent-mindedly pick a book off the shelf, flip through it, and be seized by a life-altering passage. OK, maybe not.

2. More importantly, the buyers may be saving these books from oblivion - from becoming packing material, for instance. There may be gems in these boardfeet of books that won't be recognized for a hundred years. So, we can at least think of these Philistines as performing a service for the books, though they have no better sense of a book's true value than a crow has of a bracelet it uses to line its nest.

Cheers,

Don


. April 01, 2006

Dear Mr. McKinney


I am an avivd reader to your "monthly", in fact, save them all. I want to comment on your article on "decor books". It is sad, sad, sad. Building customer collections whether inexpensive volumes or high end in the same author field takes work and patience - sometimes as much as 10 to 12 years and the elusive volume never found. Since 1973 I have never encountered the book world as it is today. Second printings labeled first (Runyon's "Guys & Dolls"), book is fine (since it is old) with frayed ends, foxing, etc. So your articles in general are appreciated.


Adrienne

Oceanside Books, Inc.

dba Mystery Bookstore


Sourcer March 05, 2006

Re: ABE and the meeting

ABE came into existence in order to serve its clients and facilitate any connections between bookdealers and book buyers. Along the way, it metamorphosed into an entity whose major interest is producing a Return On Investment for its owners. Its original raison de etre receded into a foggy background as being almost beneath its dignity. It became a profit vampire like eBay. It will keep raising fees and squeezing its income sources till they turn chalk white and and then seek new income sources. As the writer claims it is its right to carve ever greater chunks out every sale that comes near it. It is the way of our economic system. The laborers work hard to see to it that the investor class can live like royalty.

"Sourcer"


. March 03, 2006

Mr. McKinney:

Just a short note to express my thanks for your many even sided articles in
your monthly newsletters.

However, I feel what you failed to mention in 'ABE -- To The Summit And
Back' is what has been lost by ABE subscribers over the past year. Those
responsible for these losses and reduced services now seem to want a rate
hike (credit card processing) as a reward.

You (correctly I feel) suggest that ABE ..." make their site more effective
for their dealers. Find ways to sell more of their books. Use some of their
increased income to increase the dealers' income too."

But what I've seen on top of the latest fee increase are losses not
mentioned in your article: The Amazon and Barnes & Noble sales venues,
decreased service (I used to get my want matches sent via email, I now have
to download them from the link sent to me) and at times horrendous web site
performance, and associated lower sales as a result.

A mention of this may have assisted others to possibly understand another
reason for the angry sentiment of the proposed April 1 changes by many
booksellers.

Best Wishes,

Peter Gambitsky


. March 03, 2006

Dear Mr. McKinney,



First of all I wish to thank you very much for your splendid work in operating your Americana Exchange. Furthermore, your airing of the new increases by Abebooks in the use of their credit card system in book sales was most informative and stimulating.



The question arises concerning their obvious belief that they have a "captive audience" which will accept almost any change in order to sell books via abebooks' site. In the past year there have been at least two new bookselling sites. No doubt there will be an increase in those numbers as Abebooks adds to its profits in any way their new management can by further raising costs to booksellers.



Perhaps it would be helpful to list the various Abebooks increases in its charges since the new management took office. With the advanced computer programs in operation today, it would not be difficult to download booksellers' listings to another and more reasonable site.



Sincerely,

C. E. Van Norman, Jr.


. March 01, 2006

Michael Stillman's article on the ABE summit was Right On. I am a very, very small book dealer, who has seen her meager profits made more and more meager by ABE's increasing profit-motivation, while my sales have dropped because of the disconnect from Amazon sales. I understand that they must make money to continue; but do they truly need that large a percentage of a book dealer's money? And why can't they promote the site more to people who might be customers if they only knew about it? Everyone I ask says they never heard of ABE.

Thank you,

Dee Mosteller

Bookbuyers, Ink


. March 01, 2006

March Abe Article

A fine article. I have been banging my head trying to persuade UK dealers that the increased cost of using Abe is akin to having a store rent increase-which I did experience. You have to make your own commercial judgement whether or not you continue. Unfortunately there is at present no real alternative with worldwide reach.
I like your suggestion that froogle or somesuch will be an alternative whose time has come for book dealers. It requires you to have your own website, so there is a commercial opportunity for somebody to sell and maintain dealers' websites at an economic cost.


. February 07, 2006

You might want to update your current ABE article

As you certainly know, the summit stirred up more bad feelings than I thought could be possible. The word "betrayal" leaps to mind, but you probably have a better vocabulary.

I think your article deserves a little footnote, seeing as how the hopes you expressed (with everyone thinking that ABE was making a good-will gesture) turned out to be another screwing by an increasingly disfunctional site.


. February 05, 2006

Hello,

I do not know if Michael Stillman was quoting Joe Rubinfine's catalogue, or if these were his own words:
"Together, they strove to tear apart the nation their forbearers had created" in reference to Robert E. Lee. I do know that Lee was trying only to defend his home state from an illegal invasion by a warmonger president/tyrant. To state, in effect, that Robert E. Lee was out to destroy the United States is offensive, irresponsible, and totally false.

Sincerely,

Jay Lester

Chapel Hill, NC


Writer's Response

Those comments were my own, and I believe it is both ironic and incontrovertible that Robert E. Lee was attempting to tear apart the nation his father, Revolutionary War hero and Washington associate "Light Horse Harry" Lee had helped to create. One can argue the justness of the second Lee's cause. One can debate whether the southern states in 1860, or even whether a disgruntled state today, has a legal right to secede, or whether those bonds are, in the words of the Pledge of Allegiance, "indivisible." It is even possible to debate the the ethics of slavery, though I know of no sigificant leader today, even from the South, who argues that slavery is anything less than an abomination. However, I think it is impossible to argue that Lee was not trying to divide the nation. After all, the South seceded, and attempted to divide the Union into two separate states, the USA and the CSA. Is there any question of this? You are certainly entitled to the opinion that Lee's cause was self-defense from a warmonger-tyrant (although you cannot escape that part of what was being defended was the institution of slavery), but you cannot change the fact that the means chosen to effect this "self-defense" was to tear apart the one nation founded during the Revolution and replace it with two smaller ones.


. February 04, 2006

Always enjoy reading your monthly newsletter. As a dealer subscribing to the service ABE has provided over a number of years you might make note of the following comments: If someone else were to come along and offer some competition that i found acceptable i would drop ABE like a bad habit. They have become too greedy, the latest fiasco is now to force the dealers to do all their credit card transactions thru ABE processing at an outrageous 5.5%. ABE is not bookseller friendly at all. Most sellers depend upon the rapport they establish with their clientele, especially if they specialize in a particular area. Good booksellers depend upon repeat customers; ABE attempts to disrupt that relationship.



Orville J. Grady (Numismaitic Literature bookseller)


. February 01, 2006

I share Bruce McKinney's irritation with on-demand reprints being included in Abe's book search listings. Another thing that Abe needs to curb is where sellers list every copy of identical new books in their stock, thereby clogging up searches. It is irritating to check on an old title to find maybe 30 copies on offer, and for 20 of these to be identical listings of an audiobook or new paperback from Papamedia.com of Ithaca (the most frequent offender I encounter).


Regards,


. February 01, 2006

Bruce,


I forget from time to time to compliment you on your efforts to
improve quality bookselling. Especially thanks for the attention to the
problem of distinguishing knowledgeable booksellers from mimics. And,
maybe something eventually will be done to separate the facsimile
reprints from the originals. I have seen many such reprints in the
libraries of professors and church ministers, and they serve quite a
worth-while purpose for those needing the text and unable or unwilling
to purchase the original. But they are definitely, as you say,
extraneous in the used and/or rare book market. When I search for used
books I feel betrayed to see brand new books show up only because they
are facsimiles of the originals.


. January 08, 2006

I have recently found in my attic a dark green clothbound book "the Collected Works of Charles Lamb" which has a facsimile of a scratched on copper likeness of him done by his friend Brook Pulham and signed by him (Lamb) underneath, plus an entire page of manuscript in his own handwriting bound into the book entitled "a dysertation upon roast pig". It is a large page and has been neatly folded so as to fit in the book. It is published by Chatto and Windus 1912. It is in extraordinarily good condition.
I also have a signed copy of "The Works of Emerson" bound in red cloth (faded and worn) which says on the flyleaf "New and Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson - Riverside Edition" and published by Routledge I think in 1907.
I wonder if you can be of any help to me in ascertaining the value of these books, or how I should go about such task?
I would be extremely grateful.


Kind regards


Patricia Rojek



Hm... Charles Lamb died in 1834, making it extremely unlikely he could have signed a 1912 edition. It sounds like someone else signed on his behalf. Undoubtedly, the original manuscript for "Roast Pig," would be of significant value, but I suspect someone else wrote your copy on his behalf as well. Your signed Emerson suffers from the same problem, Emerson having died in 1882. Your books may be worth a few dollars, but they are not going to bring in anything substantial.

The Editor


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. February 2, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 230: Charles Bukowski. <i>South of No North.</i> Los Angeles, 1973. First edition. Signed. $1,500 to $2,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 244: Aldous Huxley. <i>Brave New World.</i> Garden City, 1932. First American edition. Signed. $2,500 to $3,500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 10: Frank Lloyd Wright. “Fallingwater Side Elevation” Original Blueprint. $1,500 to $2,500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. February 2, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 169: <i>Chicago’s Progress: A Review of the World’s Fair City.</i> Chicago: Bishop Publishing, (1933). $150 to $250
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 299: [Tanguy, Yves] Benjamin Peret. <i>Dormir dans Les Pierres.</i> Paris: Editions Surrealistes, 1927. $2,500 to $3,500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 276: Jean Hans Arp. <i>Arp: Eleven Configurations.</i> Zurich, 1945. $1,200 to $1,500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. February 2, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 235: Joseph Conrad. <i>Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard.</i> New York: 1904. First edition. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 290: Umberto Brunelleschi. Louys, Pierre. <i>Les Aventures du Roi Pausole.</i> Paris: 1930. $1,200 to $1,500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 700: X-Men No. 94. Marvel Comics, 1975. CGC 9.0. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. February 2, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 540: Travers, P.L. <i>Mary Poppins</i> [and] <i>Mary Poppins Comes Back.</i> Signed. New York: 1936. $1,000 to $1,500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 576: Mickey Mouse. 17 Big Little Books. 1930s-40s. $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, Feb. 2:</b><br>Lot 429: Paracelsus. <i>Medicina Diastatica or Sympathecall Mumie.</i> London: 1653. $800 to $1,200
  • <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste: Books and Manuscripts. January 22, 2019</b>
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> [MAGGIOLO, Vesconte] <i>Carta nautica manoscritta, bottega di Vesconte Maggiolo.</i> Italy, c.1550. Previously unknown extraordinary portolan chart. €50,000 to 80,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b><br>LA PÉROUSE, Jean-François. <i>Voyage de la Pérouse autour du monde.</i> Paris: L'Imprimerie de la République, 1797. €6,000 to 9,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> PEREA Y ROJAS, Daniel. The preparatory watercolours to the renown album <i>A Los Toros.</i> €4,000 to 6,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste: Books and Manuscripts. January 22, 2019</b>
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> MELA, Pomponio. <i>Cosmographia, sive De situ orbis.</i> Venice, 1478 [Bound with] DIONISIO il Periegeta. <i> De situ orbis…</i> Venice, 1478. €6,000 to 9,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> DE FELICE, Fortunato Bartolomeo. <i>Encyclopedie, ou dictionnaire universel raisonne des connoissances humaines.</i> Yverdon, 1770-1780. €4,000 to 6,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> VECELLIO, Cesare. <i>De gli habiti antichi et moderni di diverse parti del mondo.</i> Venice: Damian Zenaro, 1590. €3,000 to 5,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste: Books and Manuscripts. January 22, 2019</b>
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> FALDA, Giovanni Battista; SPECCHI, Alessandro. <i>Il nuovo teatro delle fabriche…</i> [bound with] <i>ll quarto libro del nuovo teatro delli palazzi in prospettiva di Roma moderna.</i> 1665-1699. €4,000 to 6,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> FALDA Giovan Battista. <i>Le fontane di Roma nelle piazze e luoghi pubblici della citta - Le fontane delle ville di Frascati nel Tusculano…</i> Rome, [1691]. €2,000 to 3,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> FERRERIO, Pietro & Giovanni Battista FALDA. <i> Palazzi di Roma de piu celebri architetti disegnati… [1655 – 1677]. €2,500 to 3,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste: Books and Manuscripts. January 22, 2019</b>
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> VON JACQUIN, Joseph Franz. <i>Eclogae graminum rariorum.</i> Vienna: Strauss Sommer, 1813-1844. €2,000 to 3,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> Prayer book according to the synagogical Ashkenazy rite in an elegant and precious silver binding. €3,000 to 5,000
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Jan 22:</b> BOCCACCIO, Giovanni. <i>Ameto.</i> Venice: Nicolo Zoppino, 1524. €3,000 to 5,000
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Private Press, Illustrated Books and Modern First Editions. January 30, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Wilde (Oscar). <i>The Sphinx,</i> one of only 25 large paper copies, illustrations and original pictorial vellum, 1894. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> King (Jessie Marion, 1875-1949). The Lament, pen and black ink on vellum. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Leger (Fernand). <i>Cirque,</i> one of 300 copies, Paris, Teriade, 1950. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Private Press, Illustrated Books and Modern First Editions. January 30, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Picasso (Pablo).- Reverdy (Pierre). <i>Sable Mouvant,</i> one of 255 copies signed by the artist, Paris, Louis Broder, 1966. £8,000 to £12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Ulysses,</i> one of only 250 copies signed by both the author and artist, 6 etchings by Matisse, New York, Limited Editions Club, 1935. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Golden Cockerel Press.- <i>Four Gospels of the Lord Jesus Christ (The),</i> one of 500 copies, wood-engravings by Eric Gill, Laurence Hodson's copy, 1931. £5,000 to £7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Private Press, Illustrated Books and Modern First Editions. January 30, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Camus (Albert). <i>The Stranger,</i> first American edition, signed presentation inscription from the author, New York, 1946. £5,000 to £7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Greenhill (Elizabeth, binder).- Flint (Sir William Russell). <i>In Pursuit: An Autobiography,</i> limited edition signed by Francis Russell Flint, 1969. £4,000 to £6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Cranach Press.- Shakespeare (William). <i>The Tragedie of Hamlet Prince of Denmarke,</i> one of 300 copies, Janet Leeper's copy signed by Edward Gordon Craig, 1930. £4,000 to £6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Private Press, Illustrated Books and Modern First Editions. January 30, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Gray (John). <i>Silverpoints,</i> first edition, one of 25 large paper copies, initials and original vellum bidning designed by Charles Ricketts, 1893. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Kelmscott Press.- Design for the frontispiece to 'A Dream of John Ball', pen & black ink over pencil and heightened with Chinese white, 1892. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan 30:</b> Crowder (Henry). <i>Henry Music…</i> Poems by Nancy Cunard, Richard Aldington, Walter Lowenfels…, first and only edition, one of 100 copies signed by Crowder and additionally inscribed by him, 1930. £1,500 to £2,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Leonard Baskin, <i>Diptera: A Book of Flies & Other Insects,</i> Gehenna Press, 1983. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Georg Heym, <i>Umbra Vitae,</i> illustrated by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, first edition, Munich, 1924. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Edgar Allan Poe, <i>The Raven,</i> special copy for illustrator Alan James Robinson, first book from Cheloniidae Press, 1980. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b><br>W.B. Yeats, <i>Poems,</i> illustrated by Richard Diebenkorn, accompanied by a suite of 6 etchings, 1990. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Georges Rouault, <i>Cirque de l’Étoile Filante,</i> Paris, 1938. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> François-Louis Schmied, <i>Le Cantique des Cantiques,</i> Paris, 1925. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Frank Lloyd Wright, <i>Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe,</i> Berlin, Ernst Wasmuth, 1910. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Hans Bellmer & Georges Hugnet, <i>Oeillades ciselées en branch,</i> Paris, 1939. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Wassily Kandinsky, <i>Klänge,</i> first edition, Munich, 1913. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Charles Dickens, <i>The Nonesuch Dickens,</i> limited edition, 1937-38. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Rudyard Kipling, <i>Le Livre de la Jungle,</i> plates by Paul Jouve, engraved by F.L. Schmied, Paris, 1919. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 29:</b> Georges Lepape, <i>Les Choses de Paul Poiret,</i> Paris, 1911. $3,500 to $5,000.
  • <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Kingsborough, Edward King. <i>Antiquities of Mexico: Comprising Facsimiles of Ancient Mexican Paintings and Hieroglyphics…</i> London, 1831-1848. $80,000 to $120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Paul Revere. <i>The Bloody Massacre perpetrated In King-Street Boston on March 5th 1770 by a party of the 29th Reg. Boston, 1770.</i> $150,000 to $200,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Battle of the Alamo. <i>Suplemento al Diario del Gobierno de la Republica Mexicana.</i> (Núm. 326. Tom. IV.). Mexico City: Imprenta del Aguila, Dirigida por José Ximeno, 1836. $6,000 to $8,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> The Declaration of Independence. The first book-form printing of the Declaration of Independence. $300,000 to $500,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Treaty of Paris, Ratification. By the United States in Congress Assembled, A Proclamation … Annapolis, [Ca. 16-17 January 1784]. $800,000 to $1,200,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Declaration of Independence. The only known privately held copy of the celebrated William J. Stone facsimile for which provenance can be traced back to a direct ancestor who received it in 1824. $600,000 to $800,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Crockett, David. Autograph letter signed ("David Crockett") to George Patton, announcing his intention to travel to Texas. $70,000 to $100,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Wytfliet, Cornelius. <i>Descriptionis Ptolemaicae Augmentum, Sive Occidentalis Notitia Brevi Commentario Illustrata.</i> Leuven: Johannes Bogaerts 1597. $35,000 to $50,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Schedel, Hartmann. <i>Liber Cronicarum cum Figuris et Ymaginibus.</i> Nuremberg, Anton Koberger for Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister, 12 July 1493. $70,000 to $100,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> New York Mets. Baseball from the first victory of the New York Mets. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan 24:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph letter signed ("R E Lee") as Confederate commander, to Rabbi Max Michelbacher, declining to furlough Jewish Confederate troops for the high holy days. $150,000 to $250,000
  • <b>Case Antiques: Historic Winter Fine Art and Antiques Auction.<br>January 26, 2019</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> Archive of five items related to John Singleton Mosby, the Confederate “Gray Ghost,” including 3 ALS and 2 colored lithographs. $2,800 to $3,200
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> Defoe, Daniel. Double Fore-Edge Painted Robinson Crusoe, 2 Vols., 1820. $800 to $1,000
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> McCarthy, Cormac. <i>Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West.</i> First edition, 1985. $1,000 to $1,200
    <b>Case Antiques: Historic Winter Fine Art and Antiques Auction.<br>January 26, 2019</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> Chagall, Marc. “Le Bouquet Rouge,” limited edition color lithograph. October, 1969. $10,000 to $12,000
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> Stern, Bert. Marilyn Monroe’s “Last Sitting” for <i>Vogue,</i> signed photograph and two books. $1,800 to $2,200
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> Five single fore-edge painted Bibles. $1,000 to $1,200
    <b>Case Antiques: Historic Winter Fine Art and Antiques Auction.<br>January 26, 2019</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> Sander, August. “Painter Brockmann” and “Courtyard Musicians” gelatin silver prints. $2,000 to $2,400
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> after Sheng Mou, Qing Dynasty scroll, landscape painting, ink and color on silk, signature of Wang Hui (Chinese, 1632-1717). $1,800 to $2,200
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan 26:</b> Russell, J. Map of Kentucky, London, 1794, showing Tennessee as a SW Territory. $1,200 to $1,800

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions