• <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>Latin and French Book of Hours, around 1490. Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br> P. Goos, <i>Le Grand Miroir de la Mer,</i> 1669. Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>L. Feininger, Letter with woodcuts, 1920. Est: € 25,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>Latin Bible manuscript, 12th century. Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>M. E. Bloch, <i>Naturgeschichte der Fische,</i> 1782-95. Est: € 40,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>M. Chagall, <i>Daphnis & Chloé,</i> 1961. Est: € 90,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>L. J. Waghenaer, <i>Speculum nauticum,</i> 1586. Est: € 180,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>P. J. de Pannemaeker, Collection of orig. watercolors, 1878-1887.<br>Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>G. Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> 1918.<br>Est: € 15,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br><i>Livro dos prestimonios,</i> Manuscript, 1665. Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>W. Kandinsky, <i>Klänge,</i> 1913.<br>Est: € 18,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>J. Miró in J. Cassou, <i>Vingt-deux poémes,</i> 1978. Est: € 8,000
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Music, Continental Books<br>and Medieval Manuscripts<br>24 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2020<br>Online</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>F. Schubert. Autograph letter to his brother Ferdinand, 4 pages, Zseliz, 1818. £80,000 to £120,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>L. v. Beethoven. Fine autograph letter to his librettist Friedrich Treitschke, about their planned opera, 1815. £70,000 to £90,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Hermann Hesse, Highly important series of 62 letters and postcards to Stefan Zweig, 1903-1938. £60,000 to £80,000.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Music, Continental Books<br>and Medieval Manuscripts<br>24 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2020<br>Online</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Book of Hours, Use of Reims, illuminated manuscript on vellum [France, late 15th century]. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Armenian gospel book, illuminated manuscript on vellum, seventeenth century, tooled calf binding. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>C. Goldoni. Ten autograph letters signed to the Genoese nobleman Cristoforo Spinola, Venice 1742-1743. £7,000 to £9,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Oscar Wilde, <i>“The secret of life is in Art,”</i> autograph quotation dated and signed, 1882. Sold for $15,600.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>Manhattan Gay Scene Guide 1969, Summer Edition,</i> Mattachine Book Service. Sold for $3,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Toyen, pen & ink illustration from <i>Marquis de Sade: Justina cili prokletí ctnosti,</i> 1932. Sold for $26,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Antonio Lopez, 9 men’s fashion studies, graphite, 1974. Sold for $6,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Harvey Milk, 2 autograph letters signed, to Pat Mormon, during US Navy service, 1954. Sold for $2,210.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Daniel Abraham, original art for <i>Stonewall Romances,</i> pen, ink & gouache, 1979. Sold for $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> David Wojnarowicz, <i>Untitled (Genet with Dog),</i> mixed media collage. Sold for $27,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Susie Gaynes & Amy E. Bartell, <i>March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights,</i> 1987. Sold for $1,188.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>Paris is Burning,</i> photo offset poster by Anne Dutlinger, signed by film director Jennie Livingston, 1991. Sold for $1,500.
  • <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> <i>All-Negro Comics</i> Issue #1, 1947. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Early Memoir of a Black Hairdresser, 1859. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> First Edition <i>Letters of the Late Ignatius Sancho, An African,</i> 1782. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Bessie Coleman Aero News Vol. 1 Issue 1, May 1930, Signed by William J. Powell. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Book of Poetry and Music by Formerly Illiterate Author Thomas Young, 1897. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Cabinet Card of 24th Infantryman, Tombstone, Arizona Territory, circa 1882. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> James Baldwin Portrait by Carl Van Vechten, 1955. $3,500 to $4,500.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> <i>The Pacific Appeal</i> Newspaper, San Francisco, 1877. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Only Known Copy <i>Spreading Joy,</i> Uplift History of African Americans in Los Angeles, 1937. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> 1940 Los Angeles <i>The Official Central Avenue District Directory.</i> $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> GRÉGOIRE, Henri (French, 1750-1831). <i>An Enquiry Concerning the Intellectual and Moral Faculties, and Literature of Negroes,</i> First American Edition, 1810. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> 1893 Indian Territory Album with Images of Tacky Grayson. $4,000 to $6,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2009 Issue

Old Children's Books Still at Risk from Lead Content Rules

Unleaded

Make sure those children's books are unleaded.


By Michael Stillman

The issue of the legality of selling old children's books in light of new lead content standards reared its ugly head again after written statements by one of the commissioners of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The issue arose after last year's adoption by Congress of tough new lead limitation standards. The new rules were inspired by last year's discovery of high lead content in certain children's toys and other articles, primarily those imported from China. However, the rules are broad enough to apply to not only newly manufactured items, but those made long ago, and not just to toys, cribs, children's jewelry and such, but anything used by children, books included. It is doubtful that Congress intended the new law to apply to books, or even thought about the matter, but nothing in the law exempted them from its reach.

The ink used in books at one time often contained lead. Bindings and other parts of the book may have as well. They probably didn't contain much of it, but some. Lead standards designed to protect production workers eliminated this usage around 1978. It has generally been accepted that books from 1985 going forward have lead content well below acceptable maximums. Pre-1985 books, however, have been subject to concern, at least on the part of some.

The new rules also require children's items to be tested for lead content before sold. That may make sense at the production level, where items are mass-produced, but what about the old book being offered for sale by a used book store, thrift shop, or simply made available to children at a library? Nothing clearly exempted these merchants and organizations from the testing requirement either. Of course, these groups may have only one copy of any particular old book, and the cost of testing is estimated to be $300-$600 per item, and destroys the book in the process. Obviously, this is not a practical option for small and cash-strapped institutions such as libraries and used book sellers.

In January, the CPSC seemed to extend sufficient relief for those dealing in old children's books. While such people still cannot sell or lend books with an unsafe lead content, it stated that it would not be necessary for resellers to test old items for which there was not likely to be a high lead content. That seemed to provide a safe harbor for the bookseller and library. However, one of the commissioners, Thomas H. Moore, sent a letter to several members of Congress that appeared to place this safe harbor in doubt. In talking about what books a library might need to "sequester," Moore wrote, "We have not gotten the kind of information we need about all the components of children's books to be able to issue them a blanket exemption. The industry has made assertions and done very limited testing, but the Act requires more, as it should, before we can exempt a children's product from the lead content requirements of the law. We cannot act on the 'everyone knows children's books don't contain lead' and 'historically there has never been a problem with lead in children's books' assertions, particularly when we now know that children's books have indeed contained lead in the past." This certainly provided cold comfort to those dealing in used books. Many thrift shops, such as Goodwill, have been reported to have removed children's books from their shelves, and even a couple of libraries apparently did so with their pre-1985 children's books.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Firsts Online Rare Book Fair<br> 27 November to 2 December<br><br> Presented by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association</b>
  • <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 1st<br>Antique and modern prints,<br>drawings and paintings</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 2nd<br>Photographs, autographs, musical works and manuscripts</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Books from XV to XX Century</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Mathematics books</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Art books from Salvador Dalí<br>& others</b>

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