Rare Book Monthly

Articles - May - 2015 Issue

Arader Galleries Helping Colleges Merge Art with Science

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Art and science are about as different as two fields could be. Or are they? New York art, map and book dealer Graham Arader thinks not, and he has bet part of his own collection of fine artwork on the idea that the two are indelibly intertwined. It is a bet that has already paid off for several universities, with others likely to be added in the years ahead.

 

Mr. Arader, owner of the Arader Galleries, headquartered in New York but with several locations around the country, has been a map and art dealer for 40 years. Much of the art to pass through his hands has been connected to the world of science. There is no greater example than Audobon plates, of which he is the world's largest vendor today. Audubon's drawings are among the most beautiful works of art to be found, and yet their primary purpose was scientific, to introduce the little known birds of America to the world back in the 1830's. It was an understanding of this connection between art and science that led him to initiate a program to bring the art of natural history to students at participating universities.

 

While the Arader Galleries has long sold fine art to institutions, the purpose of this program is to make natural history art more visible, rather than being placed in a rare book room of a library with a limited number of visitors. Art received through the initiative is to be placed on display, in classrooms or other places where students will come in frequent content with it. Mr. Arader also has supported teaching using the art, encouraging hands-on experiences with the works.

 

The beauty of the program is that the art comes to the universities at no charge. Mr. Arader has taken on the responsibility of fund raising. His long association with higher end collectors has given him access to others who share his belief in the connection between art, science and learning. Additionally, he pledges not to use a college's regular donor base to support the program, so that it does not draw away support the university might otherwise receive. There are no costs or obligations on the part of the recipient colleges other than to make the art available to its students.

 

Perhaps this still leaves the question unanswered why Mr. Arader is so passionate about the connection between art and science. His belief is that appreciating the beauty of the art will help people appreciate the beauty of the underlying science. In a mission statement written at the beginning of the program in 2010, Mr. Arader said, “It is my strong feeling that once students learn in considerable detail about the natural history of our planet, they will fight passionately to protect all living things. Once they appreciate the art and illustration of our world, they will want very much to keep it stable.”

 

Recently, he told us a story about a copy of the Octavo edition of Audubon's Birds of America he was asked to appraise shortly after the death of Laurence Rockefeller in 2004. Laurence Rockefeller was a grandson of oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, one of the five wealthy Rockefeller brothers that included Vice-President Nelson Rockefeller. While a couple of his brothers gravitated to politics, Laurence was noted as one of the most important American conservationists. Explains Mr. Arader, “Right after Laurance Rockefeller died I was asked to appraise his books. On the inside front cover of a set of Audubon's octavo Birds of America was inscribed 'For Larry on your 8th birthday. Hope this gives you an interest in conservation. Love, Daddy.'” Mr. Arader then asked, “Could looking at Audubon's masterpieces as a child have had something to do with creating one of the great conservationists of the 20th century?” That is, perhaps, a rhetorical question.

 

Among the colleges participating in the Arader Galleries natural history art program are the University of South Carolina, University of Tennessee, University of California at Irvine, Northeastern University, and Prescott College.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.

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