• <b>Gonnelli:</b> Books & Graphics 26th – 27th – 28th May 2020.
    <b>Gonnelli:</b> May 27th, Travel and exploration.
    <b>Gonnelli:</b> May 27th, Musical books, autographs & printed music.
    <b>Gonnelli:</b> May 26th, A collection of Piranesi’s etchings. € 50 to € 16000.
    <b>Gonnelli:</b> May 28th, Books from XV to XX Century.
    <b>Gonnelli:</b> May 28th, Hansel and Gretel and other stories by the brothers Grimm illustrated by Kay Nielsen. € 1000.
    <b>Gonnelli:</b> May 28th, Artists’ books from Dalì, Marini & others.
  • <center><b>Morphy Auctions</b><br>Founders & Patriots: Arms, Militaria, Documents, Artwork & Rare Imprints from the Era of the American Revolution & the War of 1812<br><b>May 27, 2020</b>
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> Extremely rare, signature of Patrick Ferguson, famed rifle inventor and British officer. $20,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> 1776 Battle of Sullivan's Island watercolor, attributed to James Peale. 11 1/2 x 17 3/16. $10,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> John Hancock-signed commission of Ensign Aaron Butler, 1777. $8,000 to $16,000.
    <center><b>Morphy Auctions</b><br>Founders & Patriots: Arms, Militaria, Documents, Artwork & Rare Imprints from the Era of the American Revolution & the War of 1812<br><b>May 27, 2020</b>
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> A Short Narrative of the Horrid Massacre in Boston, Perpetrated in the Evening of the Fifth Day of March 1770… London, [1770]. $7,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> Original manuscript of 1761 Massachusetts Bay Tax Act. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> Wine receipt for Washington's Council of War, May 24, 1778, leading to Monmouth Battle. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>Morphy Auctions</b><br>Founders & Patriots: Arms, Militaria, Documents, Artwork & Rare Imprints from the Era of the American Revolution & the War of 1812<br><b>May 27, 2020</b>
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> [Siege of Boston]. “A Muster Roll of The Company Under the Command of Captain Josiah King in Colonel David Brewer’s Regiment, to the First of August, 1775.” $5,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> Congressman Brigham describes George Washington's Mount Vernon estate and its slaves. $3,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> [British Army. Uniforms and Organizaton] "Gen[era]l. Disposition of The King’s Troops with the Number, Uniform and Colonel [of Each Regiment, 1763]. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <center><b>Morphy Auctions</b><br>Founders & Patriots: Arms, Militaria, Documents, Artwork & Rare Imprints from the Era of the American Revolution & the War of 1812<br><b>May 27, 2020</b>
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> Revolutionary era paper money, continental and state (lot of 55). $2,500 to $5,500.
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> Rare 1782 loyalist military passport from Charleston, SC. $1,500 to $3,000.
    <b>Morphy Auctions, May 27:</b> [Stamp Act.] Rare 1765 stamp for 2 shillings and 6 pence. $1,250 to $2,500.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Abraham Lincoln, Emancipation Proclamation by the President of the United States, pamphlet, 1862. Sold May 7 for $11,875.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Family papers of the distinguished Ruby-Jackson family, Portland, Maine, 1853-1961. Sold May 7 for $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> E. Simms Campbell, A Night-Club Map of Harlem, in inaugural issue of Manhattan, 1933. Sold May 7 for $27,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Papers of the comedian Nipsey Russell, including a letter from MLK, 1929-2000. Sold May 7 for $17,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Edmonia Lewis, prominent sculptor, carte-de-visite by Henry Rocher, c. 1866-71. Sold May 7 for $5,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> The Black Panther: Black Community News Service, 44 issues, San Francisco, 1967-1971. Sold May 7 for $6,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Withers, I Am A Man, Sanitation Workers Strike, silver print, 1968. Sold May 7 for $5,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> March For Freedom Now!, poster for a protest on the 1960 Republican Convention. Sold May 7 for $17,500.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2003 Issue

Slavery in the United States <br> Chapter 7

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If this violent ebullition of newborn philanthropy were really sincere, we might pardon their injustice out of regard to the motive. If it were really an emanation of that Divine precept which enjoins us to love our neighbour as ourselves, however we might regret the consequences, we would respect the source from whence they proceeded. But all experience teaches us that pure benevolence is not confined to one sect, one object, or one colour. We consequently have little faith in the purity of its motives, when seeing it shutting its eyes and ears to the abject and unhappy condition of people perishing at its door, and gazing with throbbing commiseration on the distant, perhaps imaginary sufferings of those on the other extremity of the world. We despise that false sentiment of humanity, which, while it hardens the hearts of Englishmen to the wretchedness of the people of Ireland, and sanctions the stem step-dame policy pursued for ages towards that ill-governed land, displays such keen susceptibility to the woes of the slaves of the United States, whose real situation shall be placed before the reader in due time. This truly dramatic philanthropy, which, like Garrick between tragedy and comedy, laughs with one side of its face at the hundreds of thousands of half-starved Irishmen who pay tribute to Mr. O'Connell, while it weeps with the other over the plump, well-fed specimen of republican tyranny, with his cheek shining like polished ebony in the sun, may do very well on the mimic, but we are not satisfied with it on the real stage of life. Nor can we bring ourselves to reverence that benevolence which, while it gives twenty millions in paper promises to free the blacks of the West Indies, inflicts martial law and drumhead court martials on the people of Ireland, for resisting a system of oppression far more rigid and degrading, and a hundred times more lamentable in its consequences, than that of the master over the slave in the United States of America.

It requires a degree of faith in the doctrine of consistent inconsistencies which we do not possess, to believe in the sincerity of that philanthropy which ceases to operate precisely at the point where personal sacrifices are required. To relieve the people of Ireland, or the pale-faced paupers who contribute to enable England to undersell the world in her manufactures by the involuntary sacrifice of all the comforts of life, from their present state of wretchedness, would demand of English philanthropy sacrifices which it is not willing to make on the altar of benevolence. The church and the aristocracy, those great champions of all mankind—except their neighbours—would be under the necessity of relinquishing some very substantial advantages of purse and power. The landholders, and great proprietors of manufactories would be called upon to pay a part of the wages of righteousness. It is much cheaper to lavish their sympathies on the children of Africa, the slaves of the colonies, and the bondmen of the United States. It costs them nothing, and furnishes an offset against oppression at home, similar to that of the pious devotee who stole a pig, and quieted his conscience by giving away the tail in charity

From these, and various other apt and ominous indications, it would not be treating the philanthropists of England a tithe as unkindly as they treat the United States, if we should assume, as we now do, that they are not alone actuated by pure benevolence in their course towards us in relation to the subject of slavery. It is believed that it has been taken up, and invested with imaginary horrors, in a great measure, if not solely, from a feeling of hostility to our country. The statesmen of England have discovered that this is our weak point; that the excitement of its agitation is imminently dangerous to the union of the states; and that, with a little art and a vast deal of declamation, it may be so presented to the ignorant people of England as to cause them to hug themselves in a fool's paradise, by contrasting their superior freedom with the bondage of the slave of the United States. If, aided by the efforts of foreign missionaries, and reinforced by incendiaries of native growth, they succeed in producing civil dissension and a final rupture of the confederacy, the object will be gained. The cry will resound through the universe, that the great experiment of self-government has failed, and nothing will be left to mankind but a return to their allegiance to the divine right of kings, the equally divine right of the church, and the scarcely less divine rights of the aristocracy. Hence it is, that the negro bondman of the United States is now presented to the contemplation of mankind, in the publications and pictures of the philanthropists of England, and their humble followers in this country, loaded with chains, and crying out in an agony of despair, "AM I NOT A MAN AND A BROTHER?" while his master is invested with the dignified office of his executioner. The real nature of his situation; the social and domestic relations subsisting between him and his master; the comforts and immunities he enjoys; the duties required of him in return; the obvious interest of his owner to treat him well, that he may perform those duties, and the evidence afforded in his rapid increase that he is well treated: all these mitigating circumstances, which would gladden the heart of the true philanthropist, are kept out of view for the purpose of aggravating the sum of human misery, and throwing unmerited obloquy on millions of innocent people.

We say innocent people, because slavery in the United Stales, whatever may be its influence on the happiness of mankind, is not the product of this soil of liberty. It is not our work. It is not the offspring of our independence. It is the bantling laid at our doors by its mother, England. And here seems to be the proper place to enter on the inquiry, how far its existence, past, present, or future, can justly call down on our heads the denunciations of philanthropy. What have WE done, that we should be stigmatized as "man-stealers, scourgers, and murderers of slaves?" or in the decorous language of Mr. O'Connell, "traitors and blasphemers," "two-legged wolves," “American wolves," "monsters in human shape, who boast of their liberty and humanity, while they carry the hearts of tigers within them."

We have no design, either here or elsewhere, to apologize for the existence of slavery in the United States. That it has become a great political evil may be very possible; but it is the treatment of the disease, not the disease itself, which renders it dangerous to the life of the patient. All that is necessary to render it perfectly harmless is to let it alone. That it is a great moral evil, or that its existence or continuance detracts one tittle, one atom from the happiness of the slaves, our own experience and observation directly contradict. We believe them to be quite as happy as any race of hirelings in the world, and shall produce, in due time, our reasons for the belief. We therefore do not think that the United States, or the states of the South, or the holders of slaves in any portion of this Union, require any apology. It would be little short of an insult. As a matter of history, however, a short detail of the origin and progress of the institution of slavery in this country, seems naturally to associate itself with our subject.

History informs us that the first African slaves brought into the English colonies of North America, came to Jamestown, Virginia, in a Dutch vessel. From the first settlement of the first colony, the free importation of slaves was permitted by the mother country. It is on record, that the colonial assembly of Virginia, at a time when the nations of Europe possessing colonies in southern latitudes authorized the importation of slaves from Africa, passed several laws to prohibit such importation into her limits, and that the King of England constantly withheld his assent to them. When the people of Virginia, on the 29th of June, 1776, declared the government as exercised under the crown of Great Britain totally dissolved, one of the grievances complained of against the British king, was his "prompting the negroes to rise in arms against us, those very negroes whom, by an inhuman use of his prerogative, he has refused us permission to exclude by law." That this complaint of the interposition of the royal negative was sincere, is attested by subsequent legislation. Only two years before the new form of government went into operation, and while the infant states, and especially the state of Virginia, were deeply engaged in the struggle for independence, the general assembly passed a law prohibiting the further importation of slaves into the commonwealth. Every slave imported contrary to the act, it was declared, should, on such importation, become free, and a very heavy penalty was imposed on the importer.* (Hening's Statutes, vol. ix, p. 471 ; vol. xii, p. 182.) We have not the means of ascertaining whether any other of the southern colonies followed the example of Virginia, in prohibiting the importation of slaves.** (Dr. Madden, in his late work on the West Indies, states that the continuance of the slave trade was first objected to by South Carolina.) If they did not, the omission cannot be urged against them as a reproach since they were assured that the same exercise of the king's negative would be resorted to for the purpose of arresting the operation of the law.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs<br>May 27 & 28, 2020</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Darwin (Charles). <i>On the Origin of Species,</i> 1st edition, London, 1859. Original cloth, one of 1,250 copies. £15,000 to £25,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> The Gentleman’s Magazine, or Monthly Intelligencer, 276 volumes, 1731-1894. With all the America maps, and the first British publication of the US Declaration of Independence. £5,000 to £7,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Washington (John). <i>Eskimaux and English Vocabulary, for the Use of the Arctic Expedition,</i> 1st edition, London, 1850. Sabin 101906. £3,000 to £5,000.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs<br>May 27 & 28, 2020</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Churchill (Winston S.). <i>Ian Hamilton’s March [and] London to Ladysmith,</i> 1st editions, 1900. Signed by the author. £3,000 to £4,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Wallace (Alfred Russel). <i>Is Mars Habitable?,</i> 1st edition, London, 1907. Extremely rare in the dust jacket. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Montes de Oca (Rafael). <i>Ensayo ornitologico de los Troquilideos o Colibries de Mexico,</i> 1st edition, Mexico City, 1875. With 12 hand-coloured lithographs of hummingbirds. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs<br>May 27 & 28, 2020</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Agrippa (Camillo). <i>Trattato di scienza d’arme,</i> Venice, 1568. One of 50 lots from the Leon Paul Library of Fencing. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Clarke (Sir Alured, 1744-1832). Manuscript document signed as commander of British forces in Georgia during the American War of Independence, Savannah, 18 June 1782. £300 to £500.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> [Slave Narrative]. <i>The Life and Sufferings of Leonard Black, a Fugitive from Slavery,</i> 1st edition, New Bedford MA, 1847. £300 to £500.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs<br>May 27 & 28, 2020</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Finaughty (William). <i>The Recollections of William Finaughty, Elephant Hunter 1864-1875,</i> 1st edition, Philadelphia, [1916]. One of 250 copies. £500 to £800.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> Gold (Charles). <i>Oriental Drawings: Sketched between the Years 1791 and 1798,</i> 1st edition, 1806. With 48 fine hand-coloured aquatints. £3,000 to £5,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers 27/28 May 2020:</b> George II (1683-1760) & William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire (1720-1764). Manuscript exchequer document signed, 1757. £700 to £1,000.
  • <b>Koller International Auctions: Books [and] Manuscripts & Autographs. June 15, 2020</b>
    <b>Koller, Jun. 15:</b> INCUNABULA -Fridolin, Stephan. <i>Schatzbehalter.</i> With 96 (including 5 repeated) full-page text woodcuts. Nürnberg, 1491.<br>€ 39 470 / 57 020
    <b>Koller, Jun. 15:</b> Kokoschka, Oskar. <i>Die Träumenden Knaben (The Dreaming Boys).</i> With 11 original lithographs. Vienne, 1908.<br>€ 35 090 / 52 630
    <b>Koller, Jun. 15:</b> Third Bessarion Master (active in Lombard in the third quarter of the 15th century). Leaf from a gradual, 1455-60.<br>€ 21 930 / 30 700
    <b>Koller, Jun. 15:</b> Picasso, Pablo - Delgado, José alias Pepe Illo. <i>La Tauromaquia o arte de torear.</i> With 26 original aquatints and 1 original etching by Picasso.<br>€ 21 930 / 35 090
    <b>Koller International Auctions: Books [and] Manuscripts & Autographs. June 15, 2020</b>
    <b>Koller, Jun. 15:</b> Linschoten, Jan Huygen van. <i>Itinerario, Voyage ofte Schipvaert naer Oost ofte Portugaels Indien…</i> Amsterdam, 1595.<br>€ 17 540 / 26 320
    <b>Koller, Jun. 15:</b> CHILDREN’S BOOKS - Meggendorfer, Lothar. <i>Nah und Fern. Ein Tierbilderbuch zum Ziehen.</i> With 8 coloured, lithographed plates.<br>€ 530 / 790
    <b>Koller, Jun. 15:</b> DANSE MACABRE - Bille, Edmond. <i>Une Danse macabre.</i> With 20 coloured woodcuts. Lausanne, 1919. Large folio.<br>€ 610 / 880
    <b>Koller, Jun. 15:</b> Dexel, Walter. A collection of 7 invitation cards from the Kunstverein Jena, each typographically designed by W. Dexel. Jena, 1924-1928. Each 10.5 x 14.8 cm.<br>€ 530 / 790
  • <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>Including Americana<br>Live and Online<br>June 23, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> [SUPREME COURT JUSTICES]. A very extensive collection of 203 letters, documents and signatures. A COMPLETE COLLECTION OF THE SUPREME COURT JUSTICES, JOHN JAY THROUGH WILLIAM REHNQUIST. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> ZATTA, Antonio. <i>Atlante Novissimo.</i> Venice: Antonio Zatta, 1775-1785. ONE OF THE FINEST WORLD ATLASES issued in Italy in the 18th century. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> [CHICAGO HISTORY] -- [COLUMBUS, Christopher]. Monumental historiated and embroidered panel of the MADE FOR THE 1893 COLUMBIAN EXHIBITION IN CHICAGO. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>Including Americana<br>Live and Online<br>June 23, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> [MONASTERY HILL BINDING]. AINSWORTH, William Harrison. <i>Historical Romances.</i> Philadelphia, n.d. A fine early exhibition binding by the Monastery Hill Bindery. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> [ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM]. New York: Tiber Press, [1960]. 4 volumes. LIMITED EDITION, number 119 of 200 COPIES, EACH SIGNED BY THE POET AND ARTIST. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> GRATIANUS, the Canonist. <i>Decretum.</i> Venedig: Petrus de Plasiis, 25 January 1483. Second quarto edition. FIRST PAGE ILLUMINATED BY A CONTEMPORARY ARTIST. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>Including Americana<br>Live and Online<br>June 23, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> [ABOLITIONISTS]. <i>William Lloyd Garrison. The Story of his Life.</i> New York, 1885. ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS FROM SEVERAL NOTABLE ABOLITIONISTS neatly bound in throughout. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> ANSON, George. <i>A Voyage round the World, In the Years 1740... 1744.</i> London: John and Paul Knapton for the author, 1748. FIRST EDITION. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> Blank railroad ledger, "Compagnie des Chemins de fer de l'Ouest" (spine title). N.p., 1909. A MONUMENTAL 20th-CENTURY ART NOUVEAU BINDING. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>Including Americana<br>Live and Online<br>June 23, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> [MINIATURE ROOM] -- [FLEMING, John (1910-1987)]. Miniature of his 57th Street Library and Gallery. JOHN F. FLEMING'S BARONIAL 57TH STREET GALLERY. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> [SANGORSKI & SUTCLIFFE BINDING]. CHESTERTON, G.K. <i>Five Types: A Book of Essays.</i> London, 1910. LIMITED EDITION, number 3 of 30 copies on vellum SIGNED BY GEORGE SUTCLIFFE. $400 to $500.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Jun. 23:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. <i>When Adam Delved and Eve Span....</i> [Ancoats Brotherhood, 1894-5]. LIMITED EDITION, one of 250 copies printed. $500 to $700.

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