Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - August - 2003 Issue

The Catskill Mountains and the Region Around By the Rev. Charles Rockwell

Catskill1

A bargain at $39.

A review and perspective
By Bruce McKinney


Just when I decide I don’t know as much as I think I find I know even less. For this epiphany I can thank the Rev. Charles Rockwell, Dutch Dominie of the Catskills, and author of “The Catskill Mountains and the Region Around” that was published in 1867 and revised in 1869 in New York by Taintor Brothers & Co., 229 Broadway. I grew up a scant 35 miles south of Catskill in the Hudson River valley in New Paltz and had, from about the age of 8, a deep and abiding interest in history. That this book eluded me until now is not easily explained.

The Rev. Rockwell’s 351-page book is a very complete collection of both his and others’ accounts of the history and myths of the Catskill Mountain region. There is much and many.

In this book Catskill is the gateway to the Catskill Mountains. This is not a proposition that receives much consideration in southern Ulster County where I come from but, in reading his account his view becomes understandable. In the 19th century access to the Catskills was often made by boat conveying passengers and cargo up the Hudson River. This is long before cars and even longer before good roads. Access by boat made sense.

Near Catskill was the famous Mountain House, the subject of many famous paintings and engravings. In an era captured in many of the paintings of Thomas Cole and others, mystical beauty was a recurring theme and the Catskills one of its epicenters. This book effectively brings the heyday of the Catskills back to view.

Before there were airplanes, Palm Beach and later Palm Springs there was Catskill. New Yorkers and those arriving from other parts could make the final leg of their journey up the Hudson on a virtual tour of American history. The Hudson was yet pristine and in season, filled with Shad whose last wish and goal was to spawn in the streams that fed the Hudson. Past the rocky Pallisades to West Point where Benedict Arnold entered the history books, past Newburgh where Washington quartered his troops and on past Poughkeepsie to Kingston, the first capital of New York State. Continuing north by boat the Mountain House loomed into view high up on the west bank.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Abraham Lincoln, <i>Emancipation Proclamation by the President of the United States,</i> pamphlet, 1862. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Family papers of the distinguished Ruby-Jackson family, Portland, Maine, 1853-1961. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Family papers of the Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens & the persons who served him, 1866-1907. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Autograph book with inscriptions by orators Moses Roper & Peter Williams, 1821-54. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Archive of letters, postcards, and greeting cards sent by Romare Bearden, 1949-87. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b><br>E. Simms Campbell, <i>A Night-Club Map of Harlem,</i> in inaugural issue of Manhattan, 1933. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Papers of the comedian Nipsey Russell, including a letter from MLK, 1929-2000. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Early German-American anti-slavery broadside, <i>Sclaven-Handel,</i> Philadelphia, 1794. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Edmonia Lewis, prominent sculptor, carte-de-visite by Henry Rocher, c. 1866-71. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b><br><i>The Black Panther: Black Community News Service,</i> 44 issues, San Francisco, 1967-1971. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Withers, <i>I Am A Man, Sanitation Workers Strike,</i> silver print, 1968. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>March For Freedom Now!,</i> poster for the 1960 Republican Convention. $4,000 to $6,000.

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