Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - July - 2017 Issue

A Summer Miscellany from The Brick Row Book Shop

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Miscellany Seventy-Four.

The Brick Row Book Shop has issued their Miscellany Seventy-Four: Recent Acquisitions (with a few exceptions) for Summer 2017. There's not much you can say to describe a "miscellany" beyond all that is said in that one word. We do note a fair amount of literature here, old novels and collections of poetry, often by rather obscure (at least to me) writers. American and English literature are offered the most. The dates are old, primarily 18th and 19th century, with a few items extending to both sides of that timeline. Here are a few selections from this catalogue of varied material.

 

We begin with what is certainly an unusual novel, obscure today, by a woman whose name you probably do not recognize – Frances Marie Norton. For those who believe conspiracy theories are something new, this 1888 book will reassure you they are not. The title is The Stalwarts; or, Who Were to Blame? It is described as a novel, but the fictionalized names represent real people. The long title speaks about political activities that resulted in the Civil War and the "assassination of two good presidents." Lincoln was the first, Garfield the second. What makes this book interesting is who the author, Mrs. Norton, was. She was the sister of Charles Guiteau, the man who assassinated Garfield. She maintains that her brother was crazy, had been that way from birth, but that he was unknowingly used by others who wanted to do away with Garfield, including the Stalwarts, a faction of the Republican Party, and various Wall Street and other powerful people. She said she was writing this book to warn people of the "near approach to anarchy and a military dictatorship, the sure precurser [sic] of a fallen republic and an established monarchy..." Fortunately, Mrs. Norton's warnings must have been heeded as we do not have a monarchy... at least not yet. Item 5. Priced at $275.

 

Here is another oddity. Item 13 is Poems, on Various Subjects, by Isabella Oliver, published in 1805. Ms. Oliver was a resident of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, who was not a full-time poet. Rather, she would write her poems while "engaged in the common business of life," such as performing household chores, going for a walk, or running errands. She didn't literally write them. Ms. Oliver did not have a formal education so she did not know how to write. Instead, she would commit her poems to memory and dictate them later on to someone else to put on paper. Published in 1805, poems cover topics of the day, such as the death of Washington and the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. There is also a nine-page poem on the evils of slavery, which is interesting as this was well before the development of a serious abolition movement in America, though the northern states were eliminating it at the time. $700.

 

This broadside from 1793 exploited an opportunity for the English to do what they most enjoyed doing for many centuries – condemning the French. The two were at each other's throats for ages, either as rivals or enemies. The French Revolution made the powerful in England especially paranoid as they didn't like all this democracy and equality stuff. It is doubtful they shed many tears when that revolution turned from high principles to outright butchery. Item 26 is a broadside headed Massacre of the French King! It continues, View of La Guillotine; or the Modern Beheading Machine, at Paris. It then translates the Decree of the National Convention ordering the execution and provides a description of the execution itself. The broadside also features an illustration of the execution. It shows King Louis XVI lying on a bench, his neck beneath the guillotine, waiting for the blade to drop. $3,500.

 

We've seen some unusual people already in this catalogue, but none came even close to being as strange at Theophilus Ransom Gates. Item 14 is a small archive that offers a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to collect some rare remnants of the life of the man who became known as "Theophilus the Battle Axe." Gates grew up in Connecticut but moved to New York State as a young man. He became a teacher and then an itinerant preacher. He had had some sort of visions as a boy that he wished to share. He moved to Philadelphia and there began publishing a newspaper entitled The Reformer. This archive includes three letters from Gates, four manuscript receipts in Gates' hand, and a printed prospectus for the paper dated 1823. The material comes from the 1820's. The Reformer was designed to attack organized religion, which he saw as seeking to take over the country for its own purposes. He believed it incompatible with the spirit and principles of the Gospel. In the 1830's, Gates moved to the countryside, to an area of Chester County he called "Free Love Valley." Gates believed in free love and lots of nudity, like the Garden of Eden. He gathered a group of a few dozen followers who must have had lots of fun in the name of God. Quoting from Jeremiah, he called on his followers to be battle axes fighting for the Lord. Hence, his followers became known as "Battle Axes" and Gates obtained his moniker "Theophilus the Battle Axe." Not surprisingly, they were not particularly popular with their more conservative neighbors, but the group persisted until Gates died in 1846 and a few years later before drifting away. $2,500.

 

Item 45 is one of the more controversial biographies, one that unintentionally damaged the reputation of its subject for a century. The writer was William Godwin, the subject his wife, Mary Wollstonecraft. The title is Memoirs of the Author of Vindication of the Rights of Woman, published in 1798. Wollstonecraft was the author of this feminist book, but she died in childbirth in 1797. That child was to become Mary Shelley, wife of poet Percy Shelley and author of Frankenstein. Mary Wollstonecraft might not quite have been into free love like the Battle Axes, but she was a libertine by 18th century standards, veteran of a couple of affairs and mother of an out-of-wedlock child when she married the political radical Godwin. Godwin was forthright and honest in describing his wife's life in this biography. He thought it a positive, displaying her feminism and belief in human rights, but for the century of prudishness that followed, it tarnished her reputation, minimizing her contributions to women's rights. $3,250.

 

The Brick Row Book Shop may be reached at 415-398-0414 or books@brickrow.com. Their website is www.brickrow.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest Hemingway's Typewriter Used to Write "A Moveable Feast", Impeccable Provenance From His Biographer A. E. Hotchner. $50,000 to $100,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Samuel Colt, "The Gun that Won the West": 3 Signed Patent Items for "Revolving Cylinder Guns". $40,000 to $50,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Jack Kerouac's Own Typewriter From His Estate Used to Write His Very Last Book. $18,000 to $20,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Rare Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence Printed in 1848. $15,000 to $18,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Superb Tchaikovsky ALS to Napravnik, 4pp on "Mazeppa". $12,000 to $15,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Wounded Knee Massacre Same Day Eyewitness Account by Participant, "the 7th needn't be ashamed of today's record". $10,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> F. Scott Fitzgerald Signed Gordon Bryant Portrait -- Finest Known. $8,000 to $9,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Neil Armstrong ALS on NASA Letterhead Regarding His X-15 Flights. $7,000 to $8,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> M. Gandhi Letter: "the life span of human beings is preordained..." -- Fantastic Spiritual Content. $7,000 to $8,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> "Damn the torpedoes!" Riveting 24pp ALS of Admiral Farragut's Steward Describing the "Battle of Mobile Bay”. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Abraham Lincoln Signed Order to Suspend Execution. $5,000 to $6,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Napoleon DS Featuring Imperial Eagle and Enormous Great Seal Appointing Norman Politician Baron of the Empire. $4,000 to $5,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.

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