Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - November - 2016 Issue

Spectacular Works in Cartology from Daniel Crouch Rare Books

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Catalogue IX.

The latest catalogue from Daniel Crouch Rare Books will certainly catch your eye. Catalogues that are an inch thick will do that. Catalogue IX is a spectacular presentation. There are just 60 items, meaning the presentations are extraordinarily thorough, from the detailed descriptions to the numerous color illustrations accompanying each item. Naturally, a presentation of this scale means there will be no ordinary material here. This is for collectors on the highest level. They will not be disappointed.

 

Daniel Crouch Rare Books specializes in "antique atlases, maps, plans, sea charts, globes, scientific instruments, and voyages dating from the fifteenth to the 19th centuries." Catalogue IX is a cartological masterpiece. Here are a few examples.

 

We begin with one of the most important atlases ever published, particularly for those who live in the Americas. Item 1 is the Geographiae opus novissima of Martin Waldseemuller, published in 1513. It is generally regarded as the most important of the Ptolemaic atlases. Twenty-seven maps are traditional Ptolemaic maps, likely taken from the 1482 Ulm Ptolemy, but with the addition of 20 other maps, described as "new" or "modern." This was the Age of Discovery, and Waldseemuller had begun to incorporate the new discoveries now rapidly being brought back to Europe. This atlas is of great importance as it has the earliest obtainable maps of the "New World," portions of North and South America, with Isabella (Cuba) and Spagnola (Hispaniola) clearly delineated. Something of a mystery is the surprisingly accurate representation of Florida. It is not known how Waldseemuller determined this as there had been no known missions to Florida as of that time. This all appears on the first atlas map devoted to the New World, which Waldseemuller labels "Terra Incognita." This is fascinating as Waldseemuller had produced a similar map in 1507, today known in only one copy, that called this land America. Why did he change its name? It is speculated that by 1513, Waldseemuller had become aware that the land was discovered by Columbus, not Amerigo Vespucci. He refers to this as the "Admiral's Map," likely Columbus, though that could refer to Vespucci or others. If dropping the name of America was an attempt to correct a previous error, it did not work. That original name stuck and nothing is about to change it now. Priced at £600,000 (British pounds, or approximately $733,350 in U.S. dollars). This is not cheap, but nevertheless Brexit has made it considerably less expensive for American collectors than it was a few months ago.

 

The greatest atlases come from the late 16th through the 17th century, increasingly perfected by the great Dutch mapmakers Mercator, Ortelius, and Blaeu. These atlases were written in Latin and other continental languages, but rarely English. Here is an exception, Ortelius' Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. The Theatre of the Whole World: Set Forth by that Excellent Geographer Abraham Ortelius. The Theatrum part of the title was common to all editions, but not the part in English. First published in 1570, the English version was completed in 1606. When first released, it was not only the greatest atlas yet created, it was also the most expensive book ever published. The maps were actually printed in Antwerp as with other editions, but were then shipped to England where they were combined with the text printed in London. The Theatrum was ultimately published in 31 separate editions over 42 years. Item 11. £185,000 (US $226,250).

 

The greatest of the great would be the Atlas Major of Johannes Blaeu. The rivalry among Dutch mapmakers in the 17th century was fierce, as larger and better atlases were produced by the rivals. The prize goes to Blaeu. This atlas consists of nine volumes containing 600 maps and views, most double-page. The illustrations are hand-colored in a contemporary hand. Blaeu printed 1,550 copies of his atlas over a six year period from 1659-1665. It were published in five languages – Latin, French, Dutch, Spanish, and German. The largest number was 650 copies in Latin. Item 15 is a copy of the Dutch edition, officially Grooten Atlas, published 1662-1665. £650,000 (US $786,840).

 

This next item is harder to categorize. It isn't an atlas. Crouch describes it as a "bizarre encyclopaedia of subterranean geography." The title is Mundus Subterraneus. The author is Athanasius Kircher. Kircher visited Sicily in 1637-38 and observed the eruptions of a couple of volcanoes. He went on to visit Vesuvius, peered inside and heard "horrible bellows and roaring," and experienced "an inexpressible stink." He says, "I thought I beheld the habitation of Hell, wherein there seemed to be nothing besides the horrid phantasms of Devils." He correctly concluded there was massive fire inside of the earth with volcanoes as escape valves. He also realized there was much in the way of underground water as well. However, from there, Kircher's imagination ran wild. The book goes on to describe and illustrate the world below that he imagined. There are hidden lakes and rivers of fire and strange beings who inhabited the underworld. According to Merrill, "Major topics include gravity, the moon, the sun, eclipses, ocean currents, subterranean waters and fires, meteorology, rivers and lakes, hydraulics, minerals and fossils, subterranean giants, beasts and demons, poisons, metallurgy and mining, alchemy, the universal seed and the generation of insects, herbs, astrological medicine, distillation, and fireworks." Item 14. £225,000 (US $273,411).

 

The title of this next book may not sound exciting, but it is an account of perhaps the most important scientific voyage ever. It didn't seem so at the time. Item 32 is Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of his Majesty's Ships, Adventure and Beagle, Between the Years 1826 and 1836. The first voyage, that of the Adventure, was captained by Philip Parker King, the second, that of the Beagle, by Robert Fitzroy. Each has prepared accounts of their voyages, comprising the first two volumes. The fourth volume is an appendix. The important volume is the third, prepared by the mission's naturalist, Charles Darwin. Darwin describes the geology and natural history of the areas of South America they visited. He develops no astonishing new theories to explain what he saw in this volume. However, what he saw would lead to his ultimate explanation of why there were species with great similarities, yet adaptive differences located in different places. That he would finally announce two decades later, the theory of evolution. This account was published in 1839, and this is one of a small number of specially bound presentation copies, and is a very rare copy in that it is inscribed by Darwin. £220,000 (US $267,614).

 

Here is what is apparently the first American board game. What is it doing in a catalogue of maps and voyages? The answer is its subject: The Traveller's Tour Through the United States. The board is a map of the U.S., such as it was in 1822. The states are generally as we know them today east of the Mississippi, though Michigan is a territory, and north of Illinois it's still the Northwest Territory. West of the Mississippi there is Missouri and the Arkansas Territory, but that's about it. Below the map are 139 numbered cities and their populations. You would spin a totem numbered 1-8 and advance your player the requisite number of spaces, whereupon you would be required to name the city on which you landed, and in the more difficult version, its population. The starting point was Washington, the ending, #139, New Orleans. The game was the creation of Frederick and Roe Lockwood. Item 49. £30,000 (US $36,495).

 

Daniel Crouch Rare Books may be reached at +44 (0)20 7042 0240 or (US) 212-602-1779, or at info@crouchrarebooks.com. Their website is found at www.crouchrarebooks.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest Hemingway's Typewriter Used to Write "A Moveable Feast", Impeccable Provenance From His Biographer A. E. Hotchner. $50,000 to $100,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Samuel Colt, "The Gun that Won the West": 3 Signed Patent Items for "Revolving Cylinder Guns". $40,000 to $50,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Jack Kerouac's Own Typewriter From His Estate Used to Write His Very Last Book. $18,000 to $20,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Rare Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence Printed in 1848. $15,000 to $18,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Superb Tchaikovsky ALS to Napravnik, 4pp on "Mazeppa". $12,000 to $15,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Wounded Knee Massacre Same Day Eyewitness Account by Participant, "the 7th needn't be ashamed of today's record". $10,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> F. Scott Fitzgerald Signed Gordon Bryant Portrait -- Finest Known. $8,000 to $9,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Neil Armstrong ALS on NASA Letterhead Regarding His X-15 Flights. $7,000 to $8,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> M. Gandhi Letter: "the life span of human beings is preordained..." -- Fantastic Spiritual Content. $7,000 to $8,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> "Damn the torpedoes!" Riveting 24pp ALS of Admiral Farragut's Steward Describing the "Battle of Mobile Bay”. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Abraham Lincoln Signed Order to Suspend Execution. $5,000 to $6,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Napoleon DS Featuring Imperial Eagle and Enormous Great Seal Appointing Norman Politician Baron of the Empire. $4,000 to $5,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.
  • <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Nebel, Carl. The War Between the United States and Mexico. New York, 1851. $270,000 - $300,000 MXN / USD $15,000 - $16,666
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Nebel, Carl. The War Between the United States and Mexico. New York, 1851. $270,000 - $300,000 MXN / USD $15,000 - $16,666
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Bolaños, Joaquín. La Portentosa Vida de la Muerte... (“The Portentous Life of Death”) México, 1792. $50,000 - $60,000 MXN / USD $2,777 - $3,333
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Tratado de Paz… entre la República Mexicana y los Estados Unidos. (“Treaty of Peace… Between the Mexican Republic and the United States”) 1848. $80,000 - $90,000 MXN / USD $4,444 - $5,000
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Fabregat, Josep Joaquín. Vista de la Plaza de México… (“View of the Square of Mexico”) México, 1797. $60,000 - $100,000 MXN / USD $3,333 - $5,555
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Hidalgo y Costilla, Miguel. Invitación al Coronel Narciso de la Canal… (“Invitation to Coronel Narciso de la Canal…”) 1810. $170,000 - $200,000 MXN / USD $9,444 - $11,111
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Gálvez, Joseph de. Real Cédula de Erección de la Compañía de Filipinas. (“Royal Notice of the Creation of the Company of the Philippines”) 1785. $40,000 - $60,000 MXN / USD $2,222 - $3,333
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Colección de Constituciones de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos (“Collection of Constitutions of the United Mexican States”) México, 1828. $50,000 - $60,000 MXN / USD $2,777 - $3,333
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Ruelas, Julio. Poemario Manuscrito Ilustrado, Dedicado a Lorencita Braniff (“Collection of Illustrated Poem Manuscripts, Dedicated to Lorencita Braniff”). 1903. $60,000 - $70,000 MXN / USD $3,333 - $3,888
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Espinosa de los Monteros, Juan J. Aviso de la Junta Soberana al Público (“Notice of the Sovereign Meeting to the Public”) 1821. $60,000 - $80,000 MXN / USD $3,333 - $4,444
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Constitución Federal de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos... (“Federal Constitution of the United Mexican States”) México, 1824. $140,000 - $150,000 MXN / USD $7,777 - $8,333
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Alcaraz, Ramón. Apuntes para la Historia de la Guerra entre México y los EU (“Notes on the History of the War between Mexico and the United States”). 1848. $40,000 - $50,000 MXN / USD $2,222 - $2,777
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €

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