Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - August - 2016 Issue

The American Civil War from the George S. MacManus Co.

Books about the Civil War.

The George S. MacManus Company has released the latest installment of their current series on the Civil War: Catalogue 416 Civil War Part II. I suspect there will be many more to go, as this one covers the alphabet from BR to only CR. Nevertheless, they managed to come up with over 500 items in this narrow alphabetical range. Obviously, MacManus has a large collection of Civil War items, meaning just about every aspect of it, including obscure battles and regimental biographies, can be found. If you are looking for something about the Civil War, and if in particular you're trying find an author between Br and Cr, this is the place.

 

We begin with an account of the last days of the Civil War from a Confederate perspective. Rev. Giles Buckner Cooke was the last survivor of an era. He studied under Stonewall Jackson at Virginia Military Institute (reportedly he was a very mediocre student), joined the Confederate Army at the outbreak of the war, and then served on the staffs of several generals, including Benjamin Bragg, P. T. Beauregard, and finally, from 1864 until the war's end, Robert E. Lee. He was with Lee in the days leading up to the latter's surrender at Appomattox. After the War, Cooke settled into a long career as a minister, including operating schools and churches for blacks in the South. His pamphlet is entitled Just Before and After Lee Surrendered, published in 1922. By that time, Cooke was already the last surviving member of Lee's staff. He was not done yet, as this copy of his pamphlet contains a letter Cooke wrote in 1931, at the age of 92, to his "old friend" Mrs. Charles R. Hyde. He reminisces about her father, who likely served during the war. Even then Cooke was not finished, living to 98. Item 414. Priced at $750.

 

Next up is Sketches of the Rise, Progress, and Decline of Secession; with a Narrative of Personal Adventures among the Rebels, by William Gannaway Brownlow. This may sound like a post-war recounting of the rise and fall of the Confederacy, but it was published in 1862. Parson Brownlow was ahead of his time. He was a Methodist minister, newspaper publisher, and after the war, Tennessee Governor and Senator. Brownlow was never afraid to state his opinions, which were often radical and extreme, and to vitriolically attack those who disagreed with him. Some of his causes, and he had many, were righteous, others not so much. He attacked religions other than his own, Democrats and Republicans alike (he had been a Whig), drunkards (he was pro-temperance), abolitionists (he was pro-slavery), immigrants (he supported the Know-Nothings). Despite all this, he was a strong defender of the Union in border state Tennessee, so much so that he was jailed for awhile and forced into exile in the North during the war. He returned with a vengeance, his governorship so controversial that as recently as 1987, his portrait was banned from the Capitol in Nashville. Brownlow had been dead over a century by then. As a post-war governor, he became a Radical Republican, and despite his former support for slavery, believed freed blacks more deserving of civil rights than disloyal whites. He also aggressively fought the Ku Klux Klan during his terms as governor. His book, targeting the Confederacy, was prepared while in exile in the North, during which time he conducted a well-received speaking tour of many Union states. Item 57. $150.

 

Did you know that Abraham Lincoln was born in North Carolina, not Kentucky? Probably not, primarily because he wasn't. Tell that to James C. Coggins. Item 339 is a copy of his 1927 revised second edition of Abraham Lincoln: A North Carolinian with Proof. The accepted story is that Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks, was born in what is now West Virginia in 1784. She was likely illegitimate. Her mother, Lucy, lived with her siblings and parents (Abe's great-grandparents), but they all moved shortly after Nancy's birth to Kentucky. Lucy married Henry Sparrow in Kentucky, and Nancy later moved in with her mother, then with an uncle and aunt, and finally, she married Thomas Lincoln in 1806. Her son, Abraham Lincoln, was born in 1809. So they say. According to Coggins, based on stories handed down by old-timers in North Carolina, Nancy Hanks was actually raised in that state. She was also an illegitimate daughter in this story, but is raised with relatives in North Carolina, grows up, and is sent to work in the home of one Abraham Enloe. Enloe later moves away, but one day returns to the old homestead to visit tenants and then has his way with young Nancy. Mrs. Enloe is displeased to say the least, but Enloe feels responsible. He first gets his tenant to put up with Nancy and her baby. Gratefully, Nancy names her baby "Abraham" after his father, Abraham Enloe. Next, Enloe convinces his daughter and son-in-law to take Nancy and her baby to Kentucky. Finally, Enloe pays Thomas Lincoln to marry Nancy, whereupon Abraham Hanks, or Abraham Enloe, or Abraham Whatever, becomes Abraham Lincoln. Conspiracy theorists will love this book. $150.

 

Along with the famous, like Lincoln, this catalogue offers books about the obscure. Item 52 is A Colonel at Gettysburg and Spotsylvania, published in 1931. That colonel, who miraculously served in the Confederate Army through the entire Civil War and lived to tell about it, was Joseph Newton Brown of Anderson, South Carolina. During the 1850's, he worked for his father as a merchant, then trained for and became a lawyer in his hometown. However, at the beginning of the rebellion he signed up for the army. He was near Fort Sumter when the first shots were fired. Brown would wind his way through many battles, including Gettysburg, and was injured several times. He persevered. He was finally taken from the battlefield by Union troops on April 2, 1865, barely a week before the war ended, at the fall of Petersburg. He was released in July, returned to Anderson, and had a long and very successful career as a lawyer, mill operator, banker, and even served a term in the South Carolina legislature. Brown lived to the age of 88, dying in 1921. This biography of his war years was written by Brown's daughter, and his devotion to the Confederacy can be seen by the name he gave her – Varina Davis Brown, named after Jefferson Davis' wife. She was so named despite being born two years after the Civil War ended. $250.

 

Here is another Confederate soldier named Brown, even more obscure than the last. Philip E. Brown had come from the countryside to work as a hotel clerk in Richmond, then Petersburg, Virginia, when that state joined the rebellion. The next morning he volunteered. He recounts what happens next in his Reminiscences of the War 1861-1865, published in 1912. Now an elderly man, Brown recounts his time in service. His story is both ordinary and horrific. It was run-of-the-mill for what soldiers endured in that war. They were constantly on the move, exhausted, short on food, short of blankets. Then, they would face the enemy, bloody battles took place, and the fields were covered with the dead and wounded, the latter moaning in agony. It is a story repeated until finally it is Brown's turn to be wounded. Fortunately, his wound is in the arm. In retreat, he ends up reaching a group of Union soldiers, one of whom, remarkably, looks after him, brings food and water, and takes him to a Union surgeon. There, the surgeon treats him kindly while going through the arduous, and painful to Brown, task of removing a bullet embedded deeply in his arm. He is taken prisoner, sees more doctors who say his arm has to be amputated, but he evades them. Despite the pain in his swollen arm, he manages prison life well, and is fairly soon sent home in a prisoner exchange. The doctor at home questions why his arm was not amputated, and says it must be. Brown has to escape his own side's doctor this time, makes his way back to the hotel in Richmond where he had worked, finds a better doctor who can fix his arm, and lives out the remainder of the war as a hotel clerk once again. However, that does include the burning of Richmond and his hotel at the tail end of the war. Despite his trials, this Brown does not turn out to be an unreconstructed Confederate. He believes the Union has become better than ever and is glad to be part of it, his kind treatment by Union forces after being injured leaving a lasting impression. Item 47. $250.

 

The George S. MacManus Co. may be reached at 610-520-7273 or books@macmanus-rarebooks.com. Their website is www.macmanus-rarebooks.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • ALDE, May 28: KIPLING (RUDYARD). Le Livre de la Jungle. – Le IIe livre de la Jungle. Paris, Sagittaire, Simon Kra, 1924-1925. €3,000 to €4,000.
    ALDE, May 28: NOAILLES (ANNA DE). Les Climats. Paris, Société du Livre contemporain, 1924. €50,000 to €60,000.
    ALDE, May 28: MILTON (JOHN). Paradis perdu. Quatrième chant. S.l., Les Bibliophiles de l'Automobile-Club de France, 1974. €2,000 to €3,000.
    ALDE, May 28: LEBEDEV (VLADIMIR). Russian Placards - Placard Russe 1917-1922. Saint-Petersbourg, Sterletz, 1923. €1,000 to €1,200.
    ALDE, May 28: MARDRUS (JOSEPH-CHARLES). Histoire charmante de l'adolescente sucre d'amour. Paris, F.-L. Schmied, 1927. €1,500 to €2,000.
    ALDE, May 28: TABLEAUX DE PARIS. Paris, Émile-Paul Frères, 1927. €2,000 to €3,000.
    ALDE, May 28: LA FONTAINE (JEAN DE). Les Fables illustrées par Paul Jouve. S.l. [Lausanne], Gonin & Cie, 1929. €4,000 to €5,000.
    ALDE, May 28: SARTRE (JEAN-PAUL). Vingt-deux dessins sur le thème du désir. Paris, Fernand Mourlot, 1961. €1,500 to €2,000.
    ALDE, May 28: [BRAQUE (GEORGES)]. 13 mai 1962. Alès, PAB, 1962. €3,000 to €4,000.
    ALDE, May 28: MIRÓ (JOAN). Je travaille comme un jardinier. Avant-propos d'Yvon Taillandier. Paris, Société intenationale d'art XXe siècle, 1963. €1,000 to €2,000.
    ALDE, May 28: MAGNAN (JEAN-MARIE). Taureaux. Paris, Michèle Trinckvel, 1965. €3,000 to €4,000.
    ALDE, May 28: PICASSO (PABLO). Dans l'atelier de Picasso. 1960. €15,000 to €20,000.
  • Sotheby’s
    Modern First Editions
    Available for Immediate Purchase
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: Winston Churchill. The Second World War. Set of First-Edition Volumes. 6,000 USD
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: A.A. Milne, Ernest H. Shepard. A Collection of The Pooh Books. Set of First-Editions. 18,600 USD
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: Salvador Dalí, Lewis Carroll. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Finely Bound and Signed Limited Edition. 15,000 USD
    Sotheby’s
    Modern First Editions
    Available for Immediate Purchase
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: Ian Fleming. Live and Let Die. First Edition. 9,500 USD
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: J.K. Rowling. Harry Potter Series. Finely Bound First Printing Set of Complete Series. 5,650 USD
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: Ernest Hemingway. A Farewell to Arms. First Edition, First Printing. 4,200 USD
  • Forum Auctions
    Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper
    30th May 2024
    Forum, May 30: Potter (Beatrix). Complete set of four original illustrations for the nursery rhyme, 'This pig went to market', 1890s. £60,000 to £80,000.
    Forum, May 30: Dante Alighieri.- Lactantius (Lucius Coelius Firmianus). Opera, second edition, Rome, 1468. £40,000 to £60,000.
    Forum, May 30: Distilling.- Brunschwig (Hieronymus). Liber de arte Distillandi de Compositis, first edition of the so-called 'Grosses Destillierbuch', Strassburg, 1512. £22,000 to £28,000.
    Forum, May 30: Eliot (T.S.), W. H. Auden, Ted Hughes, Philip Larkin, Robert Lowell, Seamus Heaney, Ted Hughes, & others. A Personal Anthology for Eric Walter White, 60 autograph poems. £20,000 to £30,000.
    Forum, May 30: Cornerstone of French Enlightenment Philosophy.- Helvetius (Claude Adrien). De l'Esprit, true first issue "A" of the suppressed first edition, Paris, 1758. £20,000 to £30,000.
    Forum Auctions
    Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper
    30th May 2024
    Forum, May 30: Szyk (Arthur). The Haggadah, one of 125 copies, this out-of-series, Beaconsfield Press, 1940. £15,000 to £20,000.
    Forum, May 30: Fleming (Ian). Casino Royale, first edition, first impression, 1953. £15,000 to £20,000.
    Forum, May 30: Japan.- Ryusui (Katsuma). Umi no Sachi [Wealth of the Sea], 2 vol., Tokyo, 1762. £8,000 to £12,000.
    Forum, May 30: Computing.- Operating and maintenance manual for the BINAC binary automatic computer built for Northrop Aircraft Corporation 1949, Philadelphia, 1949. £8,000 to £12,000.
    Forum, May 30: Burmese School (probably circa 1870s). Folding manuscript, or parabaik, from the Court Workshop at the Royal Court at Manadaly, Burma, [c.1870s]. £8,000 to £12,000.
  • Ketterer Rare Books
    Auction May 27th
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    K. Marx, Das Kapital,1867. Dedication copy. Est: € 120,000
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    Latin and French Book of Hours, around 1380. Est: € 25,000
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    Theodor de Bry, Indiae Orientalis, 1598-1625. Est: € 80,000
    Ketterer Rare Books
    Auction May 27th
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    Breviary, Latin manuscript, around 1450-75. Est: € 10,000
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    G. B. Piranesi, Vedute di Roma, 1748-69. Est: € 60,000
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    K. Schmidt-Rottluff, Arbeiter, 1921. Orig. watercolour on postcard. Est: € 18,000
    Ketterer Rare Books
    Auction May 27th
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    Breviarium Romanum, Latin manuscript, 1474. Est: € 20,000
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    C. J. Trew, Plantae selectae, 1750-73. Est: € 28,000
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    M. Beckmann, Apokalypse, 1943. Est: € 50,000
    Ketterer Rare Books
    Auction May 27th
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    Ulrich von Richenthal, Das Concilium, 1536. Est: € 9,000
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    I. Kant, Critik der reinen Vernunft, 1781. Est: €12,000
    Ketterer Rare Books, May 27:
    Arbeiter-Illustrierte Zeitung (AIZ) / Die Volks-Illustrierte (VI), 1932-38. Est: €8,000

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