Rare Book Monthly

Articles - July - 2010 Issue

What Can John Lennon Tell Us About The Book Market?

Dayinlife

John Lennon's handwritten lyrics to A Day In The Life, courtesy of Sotheby's.


By Michael Stillman

Items in the books, manuscripts and ephemera field do not have to be antiquarian to bring in big money. Indeed, we are witnessing something of a changing of the guard in what is collectible, as personally relevant may be gaining ground on historically significant. It is a point worth understanding in building collections or building inventory to sell to the new collector.

Last month, Sotheby's held a major auction of books and manuscripts. It included signed items by Washington and Lincoln. All told, it took in $2.35 million, with the runner-up piece taking in $218,500. However, the highest priced item topped that by almost $1 million, and took in more than half of the total realized by the entire sale. Rather than being one of the older documents, some of which dated back many centuries, it was one of the newest. Penned in 1967, it was the handwritten original lyrics to John Lennon's A Day in the Life. For those struggling to place it, that's the one that begins "I read the news today, oh boy."

Lennon's handwritten lyrics on a single sheet of paper took in a healthy $1,202,500, well above the estimate of $500,000 - $700,000. One side of the paper has the original draft in cursive, while the other has a neater, printed (in capital letters) rendition. It turns out the initial lyrics were very close to the ones used. Lennon did not do a lot of rewriting.

The similarity between roughly written first lyrics and the actual song may weigh in on the controversy surrounding those lyrics. This song has been analyzed for its deeper meaning as much as anything by Bob Dylan. Who was Lennon really referring to as "blowing his mind out," was the 4,000 holes in Blackburn, Lancashire, referring to needle marks or some other hidden meaning, was "turning you on" a drug reference? Lennon maintained that he picked up the lyrics from some stories he read in the newspaper that day, not because he was trying to pass off some inscrutable hidden messages. The hurried look of the first draft, and lack of substantial changes thereafter, makes one think that Lennon wrote the song as he explained it, not as a vehicle for complex hidden meanings.

Sotheby's also sold another important document last month, and while the results were certainly respectable, they did not blow the estimators away. An early copy of the Declaration of Independence sold for $572,500, just short of the estimate range of $600,000-$800,000. This copy was printed in Salem, Massachusetts, on July 15 or 16 of 1776. News traveled slowly in those days, so it took a little while for the original news to reach Massachusetts, and copies to be printed locally and spread around to the various towns in the Commonwealth.

This was just an isolated event, but there is an interesting comparison between these two auctions. The historic, long highly collectible Declaration of Independence did fine, but not exceptional. The far more recent Lennon document blew everyone away. It did benefit, according to Sotheby's, from having two very determined bidders fighting for it. Still, it is interesting to note that the Declaration, expected to sell for $100,000 more than the Lennon lyrics, sold for $630,000 less, or well under half as much. While the buyer of the latter was not identified, we can presume he or she grew up with Lennon's music, that his life was contemporary to Lennon's. The same clearly cannot be said of the buyer of the Declaration of Independence.

We realize that a couple of random samples do not prove a general case. Nevertheless, there are other examples of buyers bidding up items contemporary to their own lives, rather than that of long ago ancestors. A copy of the first Superman comic sold for $1.5 million earlier this year, and a Batman comic also topped a million. These are hardly works of historic importance, great writing or great art, but they are part of the lives of today's middle age and younger collectors. These people bought comics and Beatles records when they were young, but not copies of the Declaration of Independence. Now, they are collecting the things they know best.

John Lennon taught us about peace and love. Now, perhaps, he is teaching us something about the direction of book collecting.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b><center>Swann Auction Galleries<br>View Our Record Breaking Results</b>
    <b>Swann:</b> Gideon Welles, <i>Extensive archive of personal and family papers of Lincoln’s Secretary of the Navy,</i> 1791-1914. Sold September 29 — $281,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> Charles Addams, <i>Rock Climbers,</i> cartoon for <i>The New Yorker,</i> watercolor, ink and gouache, 1954. Sold December 15 — $37,500.
    <b>Swann:</b> Charlotte Brontë, <i>Jane Eyre. An Autobiography. Edited by Currer Bell,</i> three volumes, first edition, 1847. Sold June 16, 2022 — $23,750.
    <b>Swann:</b> Geoffrey Chaucer, <i>The Workes of Geffray Chaucer Newlye Printed,</i> London, 1542. Sold October 13 — $106,250.
    <b><center>Swann Auction Galleries<br>View Our Record Breaking Results</b>
    <b>Swann:</b> Dorothea Lange, <i>Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California (Destitute pea pickers in California. Mother of seven children. Age 32),</i> silver print, 1936. Sold October 20 — $305,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> George Washington, Autograph Document Signed, with two manuscript plat maps in holograph, 1751. Sold October 27 — $37,500.
    <b>Swann:</b> Winfred Rembert, <i>Winfred Rembert and Class of 1959,</i> dye on carved & tooled leather, 1999. Sold October 6 — $233,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> M.C. Escher, <i>Relativity,</i> lithograph, 1953. Sold November 3 — $81,250.
  • <b><center>Sotheby’s<br>Original Film Posters<br>27 January - 10 February 2023</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Vertigo (1958), poster, US. The ultimate poster on this classic Hitchcock title, one of three known examples. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Lawrence of Arabia (1962), roadshow poster, US. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Star Wars (1977), style C poster, printer's proof, US. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> The Navigator/ La Croisiere du Navigator (1924), re-release poster (1931), French. £5,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Bullitt (1968), special test poster, US. £3,000 to £5,000.
  • <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 817. Bellin's complete five-volume maritime atlas with 581 maps & plates (1764). $24,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 325. An early and important map of the Republic of Texas (1837). $11,000 to $14,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 45. De Bry's early map of North Pole depicting Willem Barentsz' expedition (1601). $3,500 to $4,250.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 154. Poignant map of the United States documenting lynchings (1931). $250 to $325.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 457. Extremely rare matching set of pro-German propaganda from WWI (1914). $2,000 to $2,400.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 815. Homann's world atlas featuring 110 maps in contemporary color (1751). $14,000 to $16,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 60. Miniature pocket globe based on Herman Moll (1785). $3,500 to $4,500.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 8. Visscher's rare carte-a-figures world map (1652). $14,000 to $16,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 158. Matching satirical maps of the US by McCandlish: "Ration Map" & "Bootlegger's Map" (1944). $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 820. One of the finest English atlases of the early 19th century (1808). $4,750 to $6,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 59. Important milestone in preparation for 1969 moon landing (1963). $750 to $900.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 805. Superb bible leaf with image of crucifixion of Jesus with gilt highlights (1518). $800 to $950.
  • <center><b>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts,<br>including Americana<br>February 16, 2023</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. CHAUCER, Geoffrey. <i>The Works…now newly imprinted.</i> Edited by F.S. Ellis. Hammersmith: Kelmscott Press, 1896. $100,000 to $125,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> [EINSTEIN, Albert (1879–1955)]. –– ORLIK, Emil (1870–1932), artist. Lithograph signed (“Albert Einstein”). N.p., 1928. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> TOLKIEN, John Ronald Reuel. <i>[The Lord of the Rings trilogy:] The Fellowship of the Ring.</i> 1954. –– <i>The Two Towers.</i> 1954. –– <i>The Return of the King.</i> 1955. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> CLEMENS, Samuel Langhorne ("Mark Twain") and Charles Dudley WARNER. <i>The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today.</i> Hartford and Chicago, 1873. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> LOVECRAFT, Howard Phillips. <i>Beyond the Wall of Sleep.</i> Collected by August Derleth and Donald Wandrei. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1943. $2,000 to $3,000.
  • <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair

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