Rare Book Monthly

Articles - June - 2008 Issue

Here Is A Tax Refund You Do Not Want

Irs

This "refund" will cost you.


By Michael Stillman

An insidious "phishing" expedition has been launched in time for the tax refund season. "Phishing" is the process whereby some larcenous-minded individual tries to trick you into revealing key personal information, such as credit card or social security numbers, over the internet. This one looks like an official notice from the IRS, promising a refund. This is one "refund" you do not want.

Most "phishing" emails are obvious these days. It's hard to imagine anyone still sends bank information to a Nigerian dictator's widow in hopes of getting a 20% share of a hidden $50 million account. It also seems unlikely that many still respond to a bank demand to update your information or your account will be closed, especially since you receive lots of these from banks where you don't even have an account. However, this one comes on a very official looking, yet easy to use form, spelling out how to get your refund. It even tells you exactly how much you will receive. And, in what is the ultimate indicium of authenticity, it is written in English that sounds as if it were written by an American, rather than an Eastern European (click the thumbnail image at the top to see this notice).

So how do you get your refund? Simple. Just give them your name, debit card number, expiration, the CVV code (that three-digit number on the back of your card), and your "electronic pin," the pin number you use at your ATM. The "IRS" will then credit your account with the full amount of your refund. Sure they will.

The one thing that seemed odd about this was that the IRS was demanding you supply a debit card. I don't have a debit card. However, since a debit card provides direct access into your bank account, I imagine this must be more desirable than a credit card for thieves.

Needless to say, you should never respond to such messages. Well... maybe not entirely "needless" to say because we would not continue to receive these messages if no one was fooled by them. However, if you have any doubt about such a notice, remember that the IRS has made it explicitly clear that they do not contact people by email, and certainly do not give out refunds that way. If they have money to send you, it will come in your physical mailbox, not your electronic one. The check is definitely not in the email.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b><center>Sotheby’s<br> The Library of Henry Rogers<br>Broughton, 2nd Baron Fairhaven<br>Part I<br>18 May 2022</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, May 18:</b> John James Audubon and James Bachman. <i>The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America.</i> New York: J.J. Audubon, 1845-1848. £150,000 to £250,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, May 18:</b> Thomas and William Daniell. <i>Oriental Scenery,</i> London, 1795-1807 [but 1841], 6 parts in 3 volumes, folio. £150,000 to £200,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, May 18:</b> Mark Catesby. <i>The natural history of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands...</i> London, 1731-1743, 2 volumes. £100,000 to £150,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, May 18:</b> Gould and Lear. <i>A monograph of the Ramphastidae,</i> 1854; <i>Illustrations of the family of Psittacidae,</i> 1832. £60,000 to £90,000.
  • <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Graphic Design<br>May 19, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann May 19:</b> Adolphe Mouron Cassandre, <i>Triplex,</i> pencil maquette, 1930. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann May 19:</b> Claude Fayette Brandon, <i>The Chap Book,</i> circa 1895. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann May 19:</b> Various Artists, a complete set of <i>Das Plakat,</i> set of 10 hardcover volumes, 1912-21. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann May 19:</b> Javier Gómez Acebo & Máximo Viejo Santamarta, <i>San Sebastian / XI Circuitto Automovilista,</i> 1935. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann May 19:</b> Ephraim Moses Lilien, <i>Berliner Tageblatt,</i> circa 1899. $12,000 to $18,000.
  • <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on May 30</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> Initial A on vellum, Cologne around 1300. Est: €25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> J. A. du Cerceau, <i>Les plus excellents bastiments de France,</i> 1607. Est: €12,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> E. Cerillo, <i>Dipinti murali di Pompei,</i> 1886. Est: €2,500
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on May 30</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> L. de Austria, <i>Compilatio de astrorum scientia,</i> 1489. Est: €9,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> B. Besler, <i>Hortus Eystettensis,</i> around 1750. Est: €50,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> <i>PAN,</i> 1895-1900. Est: €15,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on May 30</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> F. Colonna, <i>Hypnerotomachia Poliphili,</i> 1545. Est: €40,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> F. Schiller, <i>Die Räuber,</i> 1781. Est: €12,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> J. Albers, <i>Formulation : Articulation,</i> 1972. Est: €18,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on May 30</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> G. B. Ramusio, <i>Delle navigationi e viaggi,</i> 1556-1613. Est: €14,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> M. Wied Neuwied, <i>Reise in das Innere Nord-America,</i> 1839-41. Est: €12,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 30:</b> E. Paolozzi, <i>Bunk,</i> 1972. Est: €25,000

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