Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2005 Issue

Alibris Eliminates Its $1 Per Book Sold Program

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Alibris is eliminating its $1 per item sold fee schedule.


By Michael Stillman

Alibris announced a step last week to eliminate some of its smallest merchants, or "hobby sellers." Interestingly, it was a reversal of a recent step designed to encourage this group of very small dealers. Not surprisingly, the news was greeted negatively by the hobby sellers, but positively by many of those for whom bookselling is a more significant business.

The program Alibris eliminated was its recently instituted $1 per item sold fee for dealers listing under 500 books. This schedule had been implemented to spare monthly listing fees for the very small dealers who sell few, or maybe no books in any given month. This per item sold fee (in addition to standard commissions) was in lieu of monthly listing fees. It made it possible for these smallest of dealers to sell via Alibris without incurring losses in months where few if any books were sold. Dealers with more than 500 listings were subject to standard listing fees, but presumably these larger sellers were less likely to experience monthly "shut outs" which would cause them to lose money. Essentially, this program could be seen as an attempt to reach out to the hobby dealer, the individual selling books from a personal collection or a few items picked up at garage and library sales. But if the earlier decision to implement this program could be interpreted as a conscious attempt to reach out to these sellers, the change must be seen as a decision to eliminate this type of micro-seller from the site.

The $1 per item sold fee has been replaced with the standard $9.95 per month fee. A little quick math reveals that this is a benefit for those dealers selling ten or more books per month, a minus for those selling under ten. But, how many dealers with fewer than 500 titles listed sell more than ten in a month? That comes to 2% per month (presuming a full 500 items are posted), or 24% per year. We all should be so lucky! This is not happening. Even more importantly, not only would it reduce profits (small as they must be) for such sellers, but would convert a profit to a loss for the dealer who sells only one or two low priced items in a month. When you get down to the smallest levels, $10 may well be the difference between a profit and a loss. Of course, one might argue that such a dealer is not really operating a serious book business, but with listings spread among numerous book sites, it's possible this could also affect those a step above the "hobby" category, such as a part-time bookseller.

In their announcement, Alibris started with the rather strange explanation that this action "reduces the confusion surrounding the '$1 per retail item sold' program." Confusion? Is $1 per item sold confusing? Heck, even I can understand that! They then proceeded to give a much more rational explanation. The program "was difficult to manage and resulted in a substantial group of sellers who abandoned accounts and were less than professional in their fulfillment operations." This I can understand. With no minimum financial commitments required to list, any fly-by-night was free to post books, including those who "abandoned" their listings, or were unprofessional in their conduct. After all, the $1 program was risk-free. If one looks at this change as a method of assuring a more professional caliber of dealer listing on the site, it makes far more sense.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Eric Carle, <i>The Very Hungry Caterpillar,</i> hand-painted collage. Sold for a record $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Charles Addams, <i>Couple passing a giant bird house,</i> watercolor cartoon for <i>The New Yorker,</i> 1948. Sold for $16,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Miriam Troop, <i>Rain on Laundry Day,</i> oil on canvas, cover for <i>The Saturday Evening Post,</i> 1940. Sold for $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Rockwell Kent, <i>To All Fascists,</i> ink broadside for The League of American Writers, circa 1937. Sold for $6,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Jo Mielziner, <i>Pet Shop Drop,</i> backdrop design for <i>Pal Joey</i> on Broadway, 1940. Sold for a record $55,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Lee Brown Coye, acrylic cover illustration for the 25th anniversary of <i>Weird Tales,</i> 1944. Sold for $18,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Virgil Finlay, <i>The Outsider & Others,</i> pen & ink dust jacket illustration for H.P. Lovecraft's book, 1939. Sold for $5,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Al Hirschfeld, <i>Paul Robeson as Othello,</i> illustration for <i>The New York Times,</i> 1942. Sold for $68,750
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Frederic Remington, pen & ink illustration for <i>A Scout with the Buffalo Soldiers</i> in <i>The Century</i> magazine, 1889. Sold for $17,500.
  • <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> EARLY AVIATION PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHIVE. Chronicling 20th century aviation from the earliest Wright Brothers images through commercial and military applications. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> FIRST TELEPHONE CALL TO THE MOON. Partial transcription signed by Apollo 11 astronauts and President Nixon. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> SPUTNIK-1 EMC/EMI LAB MODEL, 1957. Full scale vintage test model of the Sputnik-1 satellite, Moscow, [February, 1957]. $400,000 to $600,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> Apollo 11 Beta cloth crew emblem, SIGNED BY THE ENTIRE APOLLO 11 CREW. $8,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> GEMINI 1/8 SCALE MODEL. Rarely seen large-scale contractor's model. $3,000 to $5,000
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> SMITH, CHRISTOPHER WEBB. 1793-1871. <i>Indian Ornithology.</i> [Patna, India]: 1828. $50,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DUPRÉ, LOUIS. 1789-1837. <i>Voyage à Athènes et à Constantinople, ou Collection de portraits, vues et costumes grecs et ottomans.</i> Paris: Dondey-Dupré, 1825. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> ADAMS, JOHN. Autograph Letter Signed ("J Adams"), [to Dr. Perkins?] while recovering from his small pox inoculation, [late-April, 1764]. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> AUSTEN, JANE. Autograph Letter Signed ("J. Austen"), to her sister Cassandra, 4 pp, "Thursday – after dinner," [September 16, 1813,] Henrietta St. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> AUDUBON, JOHN JAMES. 1785-1851. <i>The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> New York & Philadelphia: J.J. Audubon & J.B. Chevalier, 1840-1844. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DODWELL, EDWARD. 1767-1832. <i>Views in Greece.</i> London: Rodwell and Martin, 1821. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> JAMES, JESSE. Autograph Letter Signed ("Jesse W. James"), to Mr. Flood demanding Flood retract spurious accusations, 3 pp, June 5, 1875. $200,000 to $300,000.

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