Rare Book Monthly

Articles - January - 2021 Issue

Just Out: The Rare Book Hub List of Top 500 Prices Paid for Books and Paper at Auction in 2020

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Shortly before “the day the music died.”

It is time once again to look back at the Rare Book Hub Top 500 prices paid at auction for books and paper in the past year. And, what a year it was! It was a year of enormous change, though not perhaps for the obvious reason – the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. What stands out is the increasing evolution of the field away from books to ephemeral paper, often items more visual than textual, more easily displayed.

 

Elsewhere in this issue of Rare Book Monthly, Susan Benne of the ABAA (Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America) points out that this trend has not been missed by traditional booksellers. She notes, “What was once an association of book and manuscript sellers has evolved to encompass maps, prints, ephemera, zines, and other facets of material culture.” To those we can add comics and sports cards. The growth in appearances of these types of paper collectibles has been explosive over the past few years, especially during the last year.

 

In 2020, comics, a few strips but mainly original boards and illustrations, grabbed 76 spots in the Top 500. A few years ago, original art was mostly represented by illustrations for traditional books, names such as John Tenniel, Arthur Rackham, Maurice Sendak, and E. H. Shepard. Of them only Shepard appeared on the list, one time, at the bottom. Meanwhile, the work of comic book illustrators proliferated.

 

In recent years, the number of baseball cards on the list has been inching up; this time they took a mile. There are 56 baseball cards on the list. It's no longer just the old rarities – Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Babe Ruth. Now there are numerous cards from still active ballplayers, a sign that they are not very old. Players like Albert Pujols and Mike Trout make the list. Even Francisco Lindor, whose team, the Cleveland soon-to-be-something-other-than Indians, reportedly is trying to trade, is here. His nine-year-old rookie card sold for $102,000. Some of these are “Fractor” cards, manufactured in very small quantities to guarantee rarity. In Lindor's case, it was a “Superfractor” card, of which only one was made. It assures one-of-a-kind rarity. The mark-up on these must be astounding. The popularity of these cards is even more surprising as baseball is no longer as popular as it once was, no longer the dominating “national pastime.”

 

It is not just baseball cards that are bringing astonishing prices. Unheard of on this list a few years ago, for 2020 there were 25 basketball cards, with Michael Jordan, and in particular, the still active LeBron James, leading the way. Hockey struggles to find an audience on TV, but there were six hockey cards, one of which exceeded $1 million. All six featured Wayne Gretzky. Surprisingly, America's most popular spectator sport, football, was the least represented major sport, with only four. Only one of these was for an active player, Patrick Mahomes, the others being Jim Thorpe, Red Grange, and an unopened set of 1962 cards. There was even a soccer card, of - no surprise - Pele.

 

Then, there were a few collectible cards outside of sports figures. Four on this year's list were Pokemon cards.

 

Original movie posters also proved to be popular this year. There were 14 of these, all classics, not recent films. There were three posters for rock concerts, one for the Beatles, one for the Winter Dance Party tour which included Buddy Holly, Richie Valens and the Big Bopper, along with Dion and the Belmonts, and the virtually unknown Frankie Sardo. A few days later, the first three died in a plane crash, “the day the music died,” traveling to their next stop, while Dion and his group along with Sardo wisely took the bus. Today, Dion still survives, 80 years old with a lifetime of music the others were not able to create behind him. The third poster is for a concert packed with '50s stars put on by the coiner of the term “rock 'n' roll” to describe the music, DJ Alan Freed.

 

We should point out here that we limit the listings of two forms of collectible paper, prints and photographs, to those a historic nature. Those created as works of art are left off as art is a different category in a world of its own (in other words, it would totally dominate this field if included). If art prints were included, Andy Warhol would have left little room for other forms of works on paper. His impact has long been thus. Sixty-two of his prints would have qualified for the Top 500 prices. New this year is the absolutely explosive growth in qualifying prices that would have gone to Banksy. From a handful in the past, he or she would have had 58 prints in this year's list. Banksy's Girl with Balloon alone would have qualified for 11 listings. He/she should print off some more. Ever since he/she commented “I can't believe you morons actually buy this sh*t,” Banksy's work has been flying out the doors at five and six-figure prices. Banksy knows how to close a sale.

 

We also do not include paintings and similar artwork with the exception of those that were created specifically to be used as illustrations in a book.

 

Some traditional names associated with books do still appear, though even here, the most prolific are collected more for their art than words. Audubon shows up 16 times, same as the previous year, mostly for plates taken from his double-elephant folio Birds of America. This year, flower artist Pierre-Joseph Redouté appears 23 times, mostly through original artwork for his Les Liliacées, versus only two in 2019. Great job, P. J.

 

The always in-demand Charles Darwin appears five times, down from 10 the year before. That was better than Charles Dickens, a regular to these lists, who was here six times last year. He didn't make it at all this time. The increasingly popular Ian Fleming is on the list five times compared to zero the previous year. American regulars Washington and Lincoln show up six and four times respectively. Meanwhile, Lincoln's predecessor as President, James Buchanan, makes his first appearance on one of these lists through a campaign banner. Buchanan makes no one's list of great Presidents. Shakespeare is here again with five listings, same as the year before. It isn't as many as LeBron James at seven, but how many championship rings does Shakespeare have? It's not even close to Batman, who is here ten times, but Shakespeare had no super powers either. And now Pokemon is breathing down his neck. Sorry, Bill.

 

All this may seem odd, perhaps disconcerting to traditionalists. Popular culture seems to be controlling today, rather than what was once thought of as “cultural” or of importance. I will admit to not feeling quite right that Senator Richard Henry Lee's letter to George Washington, informing him that he had just been elected as the first President of the United States, is valued at less than a slew of ball cards and comic books, but the invisible hand of the marketplace works in mysterious ways. Perhaps most surprising to me are the five Lou Gehrig items on this list. Three are his baseball cards, sold for $264,000, $111,000, and $78,000, while two of his baseball contracts went for $138,000 and $111,000. One other Gehrig item appears on this list, though at the bottom, for $75,000. It is a four-page letter he wrote to his doctor and it concerns what Gehrig is most known for today, and it doesn't concern sports and games. It describes his personal battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), the tragic illness now known as “Lou Gehrig's Disease” which took his life. This seems of so much more significance than his baseball cards but who is to say? Each generation gets to make its own choice of what is valuable and as always, it is a moving target.

 

There is one bright spot for traditionalists in this list. Among all the sports cards, comics, and illustrations, at the very top of this list is a book, a traditional book, all text, no plates, no in-book illustrations, just words. It sold for more than six times as much as the second most expensive item. Move over, Batman. There is still a place for great literature.

 

The highest prices of 2020 were down some from 2019. While the highest price was up over $1 million from the prior year, there were only four millionaires in 2020. In 2019 there were eight. Perhaps most telling of overall prices at the top end was how much was for paid for the 500th most expensive item on the list. In 2019, it was $81,250. In 2020, it was only $75,000. That is a price decline of almost 8%.

 

Here are the Top 10 highest prices paid at auction this past year, followed by a link to the full Top 500 list.

 

10. Heures De Pierre Soppite Et Marie Deschevert. A French Book of Hours, an illuminated manuscript created around 1400-1410. $781,759.

 

9. Amazing Fantasy Marvel #15 from 1962. It features Spider Man. Original price was 12¢. It has increased in value since 1962 by 662 million percent. $795,000.

 

8. Heures de G et H. Another illuminated manuscript Book of Hours from France, circa 1500-1510. $850,014.

 

7. La Harpe Manuscript Map of Louisiana by Jean-Baptiste Bénard de la Harpe, circa 1722-1725. One of two known extant copies of this map of Louisiana when only its southernmost territory was known to Europeans. $875,000.

 

6. 1997 Metal Universe Card of Michael Jordan. Obviously, a very special basketball card to collectors. $915,000.

 

5. Heap & Scull View of Philadelphia, by George Heap and Nicholas Scull. A four-panel view of Philadelphia in 1754, as seen from the New Jersey side. $968,750.

 

4. John Hancock Manuscript Letter. This July 6, 1776, manuscript letter, bearing Continental Congress President John Hancock's famous signature, announces the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. $1,040,000.

 

3. O-Pee-Chee Wayne Gretzky #18. Hockey star Wayne Gretzky's 1979 rookie card. If this one surprises you, you are not alone. $1,290,000.

 

2. Detective Comic #27. This 1939 comic book introduced Batman to the world. Original price was 10¢, good for a price increase of 1.5 billion percent. $1,500,000.

 

1. Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories & Tragedies, better known as the First Folio. Published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare died, it was put together by a few of his friends to preserve the plays of the Bard. It contains 36 plays, 18 of which would have been lost forever had his friends not published copies of these unpublished gems. Macbeth, The Twelfth Night, and Julius Caesar are among those that would have been lost. Shakespeare wanted to perform his plays, but took little care to preserve them. The greatest work of English literature, perhaps of that in any language. A most deserving #1. $9,978,000.

 

Here is a link to the entire Rare Book Hub Top 500.

 

Addendum: we missed a couple of items that were included in a Christie's art sale. They are:

The Almanac Book of Hours, use of Rome, an illuminated manuscript from the 1490s by Master of the Monypenny Breviary and associates. $2,088,000.

The Prayerbook of Mary Queen of Scots by the Master of Francois de Rohan circa 1535-1540. $398,400.


Posted On: 2021-01-01 18:32
User Name: jwrb

Scratching my head as to why sports cards (or Pokeman cards) and Golden Age vintage comic books should be included on this list, except as a very arbitrary decision. These categories are hardly dominate at major book and ephemera fairs, and instead appear to be shoe-horned in to this list, as if they were part of the regular trade in antiquarian booksellers, manuscripts and ephemera. They are not. Sports cards and comics have been and remain marginal to the antiquarian book trade, even as they become dominate trades in the field of popular culture and significant in themselves. Perhaps RBH should initiate one or two other “Top 500” lists to accommodate collectors, dealers and appraisers of sports cards and comics, while maintaining the annual Top 500 list for antiquarian books, manuscripts and ephemera distinct from the two pop culture categories. My two cents.


Posted On: 2021-01-02 04:02
User Name: savitale

I don't understand the inclusion of prints and sports cards as part of this list, or even less, the inclusion of banknotes in the auction records. Currency falls clearly into the domain of numismatics, baseball cards to that of sports memorabilia, and prints to the art market. For me, inclusion of these items dilutes the value of this analysis to book collectors. It appears like a weak attempt to attract advertising or subscription dollars from folks in the other collectable markets.


Posted On: 2021-01-02 06:25
User Name: AE244155

Writer's Response: These are fair criticisms and one we debate each year. This has always been a list of "works on paper," that is, more than just books. At one time some were displeased with the inclusion of manuscripts but these now proliferate at book fairs and are handled by many booksellers. Historic prints and plates from disbound books (hopefully defective copies) are also common. Any currency items should have been removed and must have been missed (there would have been a lot of this in the list if intentional). As for comics and baseball cards, a few years ago these were rarities, sort of humorous insignificant inclusions because of their rarity and that such prices for these were a surprise. No more. Perhaps they should be removed, but their inclusion provides useful information as to what sort of paper is becoming more collectible. Perhaps some booksellers will start adding them to their offerings, just as they are showing up in more auctions with books. And, on the other side, there are "books" that are really little more than a bound collection of art prints. We include them. Our best answer has been to provide a very large list of top sellers so everything can be found and prices compared. AbeBooks provides a top 10 list while we publish a top 500 so that more types of items can be included. In this case, any book that brought $75,000 or more still can be found.


Posted On: 2021-01-03 08:31
User Name: 19531953

Sometimes we would like to delete things that make us angry or sad,.. ,BUT Bruce was absolutely fair and correct to include baseball cards and comic books...these categories like photographs, broadsides and newspapers have always been part of what in the 70's was called Paper Americana (I still have my copy of the yellow softcover wrapped guide to prices) and now widely known as ephemera. Do I get sad when a comic book brings more than a great 18th century broadside? Of course I do! However knowledge is power and I sold a press photo of Mickey Mantle...used to make his rookie baseball card, for $400,000 (my cut 250,000). Just think about all of the other Paper Americana that I could have purchased with that money!!!
Eric C. Caren


Posted On: 2021-01-03 08:50
User Name: 19531953

PS I now note that Michael did this list so thanks to him as well
ECC


Posted On: 2021-01-05 17:37
User Name: pgodrej

Shouldn't this have been number 2 on the list?

https://www.christies.com/lot/lot-a-timurid-or-aqquyunlu-quran-on-chinese-6255702/?from=searchresults&intObjectID=6255702


Posted On: 2021-01-05 17:47
User Name: pgodrej

Here are some more items that should have made it on to the list:

https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/auction/2020/arts-of-the-islamic-world-india-including-fine-rugs-and-carpets/khwand-amir-d-1534-habib-al-siyar-vol-3-2-a?locale=en

https://www.roseberys.co.uk/feature/Royal-manuscript-achieves-over-200000-and-wins-prestigious-award/?i=321


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>September 23, 2021</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 20. ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY. Letter to the editors of the Boston Atlas on slavery and its political ramifications, 1842. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 208. HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. <i>A Farewell To Arms.</i> New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1929. First edition. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 237. ADDAMS, CHARLES. Original drawing "Now Remember-act casual." $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>September 23, 2021</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 4. SMITH, ADAM. <i>An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations.</i> Philadelphia, 1789. The first American edition. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 131. BEETHOVEN, LUDWIG VON. <i>Cinquieme Sinfonie en ut mineur: C Moll de Louis Van Beethoven. Oeuvre 67.</i> First edition of the complete score. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 73. Chinese Export Painting. Album of twenty-three original Chinese natural history studies of flowers and insects. Likely Canton: circa 1850. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>September 23, 2021</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 241. GOREY, EDWARD. Original drawing "Cat Drawing Wallpaper." Signed in Pencil in lower right margin. $2,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 36. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Autograph note signed instructing Edwin Stanton to meet with the important African American abolitionist and officer Martin Delany. [Washington:] 21 February 1865. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 112. JONSON, BEN. <i>Workes</i>. London: William Stansby, 1616; Together with <i>Workes.</i> London: Richard Meighen,1640-41. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 161. STURGIS, LEE. <i>Salmon Fishing on Cain River, New Brunswick.</i> (Chicago:) Privately printed (for the author by Ralph Fletcher Seymour), 1919. First edition. $3,000 to $5,000.
  • <b><center>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>The Library of Howth Castle<br>September 22nd & 23rd, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Rosellini (Ippolito). <i>I Monumenti dell Egitto e Della Nubia,</i> Plate Volumes 1, 11 & 111, 3 vols. Elephant folio. €50,000 to €80,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Curtis (William), 1746 - 179, & other Editors. <i>The Botanical Magazine: or, The Flower Garden Displayed.</i> London 1793 - 1982-83. Together 184 vols. [with] other botanical material. €30,000 to €40,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Berkeley (George). <i>A Treatise Concerning the principles of Human Knowledge, wherein the chief Causes of Error and Difficulty in the Sciences…</i> Part I, Dublin, 1710 Rare First Edn. €15,000 to €20,000.
    <b><center>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>The Library of Howth Castle<br>September 22nd & 23rd, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Ruskin (John). A large finely executed Pencil Drawing, captioned <i>Oxford Cathedral, The Choir,</i> & Signed 'J. Ruskin Ch. Ch. 1838. €15,000 to €20,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Sir Edward L. Lutyens. Howth Castle Plans: A Series of 10 Original Architects Drawings and Sketches, Alterations and Additions for J.C. Gaisford St. Lawrence, County Dublin, Ireland. €8,000 to €12,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Newman (Rev. Fr. John Henry, later Cardinal, now Saint) A very good collection of 24 A.L.S. to [Thomas] Gaisford of the Gaisford St. Lawrence family of Howth Castle. €10,000 to €15,000.
    <b><center>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>The Library of Howth Castle<br>September 22nd & 23rd, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Manuscript Atlas: Hodges, Smith & Co. <i>The Estate of the Rt. Hon. the Earl of Howth Situate in the County of Dublin,</i> lg. atlas folio Dublin (Hodges, Smith & Co.) 1863. €4,000 to €6,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Anon. <i>Herbolario Volgare: nel quale se dimostra conoscer le herbe et le sue vrtu…</i> Sm. 8vo Venice (Gio Maria Palamides) 1539. €3,000 to €4,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Baron (Caesar). <i>Annales Ecclesiastici</i>. [With] <i>Annalium Ecclesiasticorum Caesaris Baronii... Apparatus.</i> [With] <i>Index Universalis Rerum Omnium</i> [and one other]. 38 vols total. €1,500 to €2,000.
    <b><center>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>The Library of Howth Castle<br>September 22nd & 23rd, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Log Books of Three British Warships. Three folio Volumes, containing meticulously arranged logs of the voyages of Royal Navy Ships from 1876 – 1881. €1,200 to €1,800.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Walpole (Robert). <i>Memoirs Relating to European and Asiatic Turkey,</i> lg. 4to Lond. 1817. €1,000 to €1,500.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Sep. 22-23:</b> Bosio (Antonio). <i>Roma Sotteranea,</i> Opera Postuma. Large thick folio Rome (Guglielmo Facciotti) 1632. €1,000 to €1,500.
  • <b>Il Ponte, Sep. 21:</b> ZEILER, Martin - <i>Topographiae Italiae.</i> Francoforte: Mattheus Merian, 1688. €3,500 to €4,500.
    <b>Il Ponte, Sep. 21:</b> HAMILTON, William, Sir -- HANCARVILLE, Pierre-Francois HUGUES - Collection of Etruscan, Greek and Roman Antiquities from the Cabinet of the Hon. William Hamilton. Napoli: Francois Morelli, 1766-67. €38,000 to €48,000.
    <b>Il Ponte, Sep. 21:</b> [ASTRONOMIA] - Manoscritto astronomico. Italia: 1650. €1,000 to €1,500.
    <b>Il Ponte, Sep. 21:</b> DALI, Salvador - <i>Biblia Sacra vulgatae editionis.</i> Edizione “Ad Personam” Milano: Rizzoli, 1967. €40,000 to €60,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> C.F. Payne, <i>Micawber—Imitating Norman Rockwell's "Triple self-portrait,"</i> acrylic, watercolor & colored pencil, 2002. Sold June 2021 for $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Jane Russell, archive of letters written during a whaling voyage, 1840s. Sold July 2021 for $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Guild of Women Binders, exhibition binding of A.F. Pollard’s <i>Henry VIII,</i> London, 1902. Sold July 2021 for $12,350.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Robert Frost, <i>Collected Poems,</i> author’s presentation copy, signed, with entirety of <i>Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening</i> inscribed, NY, 1930. Sold June 2021 for $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> James Joyce, <i>Ulysses,</i> deluxe limited issue, signed, London, 1936. Sold June 2021 for $21,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Mercator [family], <i>[World and Continents],</i> 5 double-page maps, Amsterdam, c. 1633. Sold June 2021 for $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> George Schlegel, <i>New York, Taken from Central Park,</i> hand-finished color-tinted lithograph, 1874. Sold June 2021 for $11,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Nicolaus Copernicus, <i>De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium,</i> second edition, Basel, 1566. Sold April 2021 for $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Book of Hours, Use of Utrecht, illuminated manuscript, c. 1435-45. Sold April 2021 for $60,000.

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