• <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Age of Wonder<br>Nov. 25 – Dec. 9, 2022</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 25-Dec. 9:</b> Darwin, Charles. His definitive statement on natural selection, and his legacy. $600,000 to $800,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 25-Dec. 9:</b> Darwin, Charles and Alfred Russel Wallace. Darwin announces the theory of natural selection. $250,000 to $350,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 25-Dec. 9:</b> Jenner, Edward. Autograph letter, addressed to Dr. Wollaston, dated 21 November 1800, discussing the possible ill-effects of vaccination. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Age of Wonder<br>Nov. 25 – Dec. 9, 2022</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 25-Dec. 9:</b> De Quincey, Thomas. Autograph letter signed (Thos. De Quincey). "A conclusive experiment on the profit of leaving of leaving off opium.” $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 25-Dec. 9:</b> Melville, Herman. <i>Moby-Dick; or, The Whale.</i> New York: Harper & Brothers, 1851. “And God created great whales.” $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 25-Dec. 9:</b> Foote, Eunice Newton. "Circumstances affecting the heat of the sun's rays," [In:] <i>The American Journal of Science and Arts…</i> New York, 1856. $8,000 to $12,000.
  • <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors’ Sale<br>6th and 7th December</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> The Corner-stone Document of Irish Freedom. 1916 PROCLAMATION OF THE IRISH REPUBLIC. £140,000 to £180,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Joyce's Modern Masterpiece, in its one-and-hundredth Year. Joyce (James). <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare & Co. 1922. £15,000 to £25,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b>A Request from Mr. Joyce. Joyce (James). Autograph Letter Signed to 'Dear Mr [Thomas] Pugh,' dated 6.8.1934. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors’ Sale<br>6th and 7th December</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Dun Emer Press: Yeats (Wm. Butler). <i>Stories of Red Hanrahan,</i> 8vo Dundrum 1904. Signed by Author. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Binding: <i>Specimens of Early English Poets,</i> 8vo Lond. (For Edwards, Pall Mall) 1790. £500 to £700.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Harry Clarke: Walter (L. D'O.) <i>The Years at the Spring,</i> An Anthology of Recent Poetry. 4to New York (Brentano's) 1920. Special signed limited edition. £1,500 to £2,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors’ Sale<br>6th and 7th December</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Kipling (Rudyard). <i>Works,</i> including Writings, Novels, Poems etc. Bombay Edition, 31 vols. roy 8vo Lond. (MacMillan & Co.) 1913-1938. Signed by Author. £1,500 to £2,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Dunraven (Edwin, Third Earl of). <i>Notes on Irish Architecture,</i> Ed. by Margaret Stokes, 2 vols. lg. folio Lond. 1875-1877. Castle Hackett copy. £1,500 to £2,400.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Kirby (Wm.) & Spence (Wm.) <i>An Introduction to Entomology,</i> 4 vols. 8vo Lond. 1822. With hand-coloured plates. £200 to £300.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors’ Sale<br>6th and 7th December</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Heaney (Seamus). <i>Death of a Naturalist,</i> 8vo Lond. (Faber & Faber) 1966 First Edition - Third Impression. Signed, & inscribed on title page 'Seamus Heaney’. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 6-7:</b> Glasgow Printing: Homer - <i>Iliad and Odyssey,</i> 4 vols. in 2, Glasgow (Robert & Andrew Foulis) 1756-1758. £1,0000 to £1,500.
  • <center><b>University Archives<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts & Books<br>December 14, 2022</b>
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> Thomas Jefferson, Long ALS to Ronaldson "I consider Bonaparte as fighting our battles, and there I wish him success...” $35,000 to $45,000.
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> G.A. Custer. PSA Mint 9 Brady CDV Signed with Rank, Best Signature/Pose We Have Ever Seen. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> B. Franklin. 1733 Signed Philadelphia Partial Land Grant Dated Less Than 6 Months After Launch of "Poor Richard's Almanack". $12,000 to $15,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts & Books<br>December 14, 2022</b>
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> Abraham Lincoln On Executive Mansion Stationery Replies to An Autograph Request! Fantastic Example. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> G. Washington. Free Frank to Maj. Tallmadge Re: Culper Courier. $12,000 to $14,000.
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> Albert Einstein ALS, “I am happy to see that a Jew is always 'en famille' wherever his steps lead him on this earth.” $5,000 to $6,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts & Books<br>December 14, 2022</b>
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> Incredible Utah 1857 Mormon War Period Ft. Bridger Ledger: Afr. American Content, Mention of Armstead, Bernard Bee, RE Lee’s Son, 120pp! $10,000 to $12,000.
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> Apollo XI. PSA Mint +9.5 Insurance Cover Signed by Armstrong, Aldrin & Collins, From Buzz Aldrin Family Space Collection. $8,000 to $10,000.
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> Booker T. Washington, 17 Pages "Proud of Race...In & out of slavery...It is said that the strongest chain is no stronger than its weakest link." Handwritten Speech Notes. $8,000 to $9,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts & Books<br>December 14, 2022</b>
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> R. Wallenberg. Signed Schutz-Pass Doc, With Rare Full Signature. $7,000 to $8,000.
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> Freud & Jung Together, Most Famous Photo in Psychology History! September 1911, Weimar, Germany. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b>University Archives, Dec. 14:</b> JFK Oversized Photo with Jackie & Caroline, Signed and Inscribed, Stunning! $3,500 to $4,500.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2020 Issue

The Kirkbride Caper

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Clarence Wolf, the author

This recollection was written recently.  The author has been a book dealer in Philly so long 17 year locusts have thrice come by.

A couple of months ago an old friend of mine sent me an article that had appeared in the June, 2020 issue of The American Stamp Collector & Dealer. My friend Gus Spector, a retired physician, is an avid book collector. His book collection’s primary focus is Philadelphia, with an emphasis on ephemera. The collection includes a number of albums that contain pictorial envelopes that depict buildings and neighborhoods long since gone. Because most of these envelopes have stamps and postal marks they attract people whose interests are mainly philatelic, however they are also prized by bibliophiles and ephemerists .

 

The article, “A Moment in Postal History”, by Kevin Lowther, is the story of a cache of letters written by Thomas Story Kirkbride that were sold at an auction in 2019, that turned out to have been stolen. Thomas Story Kirkbride (1809-1883) is considered to be one of the pioneers in psychiatry, during what has been termed “the renaissance in psychiatry”. Dr. Kirkbride received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1832. After that he was a resident at the Friends Asylum for the Insane, and later in private practice for several years. In 1840 he was elected physician in chief and superintendent of the Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane, a position he held until his death 43 years later. The letters Mr. Lowther purchased were stolen from Pennsylvania Hospital. After reading this article I was taken back in time to an incident that occurred nearly fifty years ago.

 

Our old book shop was located at 1317 Irving Street in center city Philadelphia. It sat behind the Library Company of Philadelphia and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania on a small street that ran for only one block. Despite our proximity to those distinguished institutions, there were a fair number of less than desirable bars and clubs that surrounded our place of business. Today what was once Philadelphia’s tenderloin district is now a much more respectable neighborhood. Most people had no idea that Irving Street existed, and giving directions was always a bit challenging. Most of our business was done via catalog, or direct quote. Because of our obscure location we had very few walk in customers. People from out of town usually had trouble finding us, and many of our customers who knew where we were chose not to visit because of our less than genteel location.

 

In 1971 I was a young bookseller, and had just taken over the MacManus Company from my parents. One day in early October of that year two men in their mid to late twenties entered the shop and proceeded to offer me books and documents. I don’t remember too much about the books, although I seem to recall that one of them was a Franklin imprint. I do however have a vivid recollection of the manuscript material .There were numerous letters written by Thomas Story Kirkbride and others by Benjamin Rush. In addition to letters they had Kirkbride’s manuscript doctoral thesis, “An Essay on Neuralgia”. There were other letters, but they were less important.

 

 Even though I was a young tyro with only slightly more than three years of bookselling under my belt, I knew that this material was really good. I also knew that it didn’t belong to the two men who brought it to me. One of them, the” talker” we’ll call him, couldn’t construct a simple grammatically correct sentence. The other one displayed a certain economy of language, and would only weigh in with periodic grunts. The more I looked at this material, the more its importance hit me. These documents had great historical as well as monetary value. At one point I was speaking with the “talker”, and I said something like “this stuff is really hot”, meaning of course that it was good. He turned chalk white, because his interpretation of “hot” was in the vernacular.

 

I now found myself in a very uncomfortable position. I knew that if I confronted them they would leave and that would be the last anyone would see of these documents. I cajoled them into thinking that I would “fence” the material and sell it for them. We agreed that I would need some time to price and research these pieces before I could sell them. They left everything with me and a date was set for the following week for us all to get together.

 

I now was faced with the task of figuring out where they had been stolen from. In retrospect it should have been easier than it was, but I was green and it took longer than expected. I contacted the Historical Society, The American Philosophical Society, and finally Pennsylvania Hospital. Once it was established that these materials were stolen from Pennsylvania Hospital, their security people put me in touch with the Philadelphia police. Two plain clothes detectives came to my shop and interviewed me about all that had transpired. I told them when I had agreed to meet with the two men, and it was arranged that the detectives would get to the shop an hour in advance of their arrival.

 

I remember the events of that day with great clarity. Ten minutes or so before the thieves were supposed to arrive, H. Tatnall Brown, a customer, and former dean of Haverford College came in. He was an older gentleman (actually I am now older) who was a bit hard of hearing. Not without great difficulty I managed to get him to go to the rear of the shop, explaining as best I could that an arrest was about to take place. Just at that moment the front door opened and the two men entered. My desk was in the front of the shop, about twenty feet from the front door, and there were two chairs that sat directly in front of it. The two sat down and I proceeded to engage them in conversation. When at some point they had incriminated themselves sufficiently the two officers, who had been hiding half way up the stairs, but within earshot, ran down and arrested them at GUNPOINT! I had not bargained for that, and it took me a while to regain my composure. The detectives handcuffed the two and off they went.

 

The bad guys were arrested.  I did my civic duty by making sure that these documents were returned to their rightful owners. What could possibly go wrong? Well, as it turned out, plenty.

 

The two thieves were taken to the police station on Eighth Street, and were being held until their arraignment. Once there, it was discovered that one of the men, the “talker” was a security guard at Pennsylvania Hospital.  A bit later one of the arresting officers happened to notice that one of the pair was trying to hide a piece of paper. The policeman took the paper, which turned out to be a phone bill in the thief’s name, but that listed an address that was not the one he had given as his lawful residence. A warrant was obtained and the police searched the building in question.

 

Imagine my surprise when I was informed that the building in question was a house that was being used as an indoor marijuana farm. These morons were taking their ill-gotten gains from selling stolen manuscripts and putting them into what was then a somewhat hi –tech hydroponic weed factory. This was beginning to look like a modern day Horatio Alger story that had gone off the rails.

 

There were however a couple of unforeseeable problems. Pennsylvania Hospital sent me letters praising me and my actions. These praises, as it turned out were being sung faintly. The hospital was quite embarrassed because they no idea that anything had been stolen, and worse, nothing had ever been properly cataloged, and therefore they had no idea what items were missing. This of course made them look negligent, but despite that, they had to go through the motions of recognizing my heroic actions.

 

The other problem was that Coins and Currency, a local auction house had been buying items from these two and selling them on consignment as well. This was unfortunate for more than one reason. The person who ran the auction was a woman I had known since I was a small boy. Her brother had been extremely kind to me in my youth, so I was very sorry that she was involved. The result of her implication in all this was that she never spoke to me again.

 

Since the criminals’ nefarious activities included drugs I was now convinced that I had unwittingly stumbled into some sort of organized crime syndicate. A date was set for their court case which was a month or so after their arrest. It would be a gross understatement to say that I was nervous. I was petrified. I kept all my doors locked, and constantly looked over my shoulder. I had a starter pistol which I thought about carrying, but decided that it probably wasn’t necessary. I would have run fast enough without it.

 

Finally we had our day in court. The trial took place in City Hall. There were several cases being heard before ours. By the time our case was finally called I was really nervous, and I had no idea what to expect. The judge was a very large and somewhat disinterested person. I remember that he had great difficulty in understanding the importance of these stolen papers. I think if these men had taken a car, or television sets he would have gotten it. They were being defended by a public defender, and I was just there by myself. When I testified, their lawyer tried to make it look as if I had led these poor lambs astray, and really put me on the spot.

 

The judge sentenced them to three years in jail, and immediately suspended the sentence. My nervousness had reached new heights and I was a basket case. I couldn’t understand how this could happen. And more importantly I didn’t know what to do. I was convinced that my shelf life was fast approaching its expiration date.

 

Fortunately nothing ever came of all this despite all my concerns. What did happen was that I was awarded a Citizen Commendation by the Philadelphia Police Department. It has the gold seal of the city police department and is signed by the police commissioner.

 

The other thing that came of all this was a headline in one of Philadelphia’s newspapers. In those days Philadelphia had three daily papers: The Inquirer, the Bulletin, and the Daily News. My mother who was a bit of a snob always disparaged the Daily News, Philadelphia’s daily tabloid. Both the Inquirer and the Bulletin made scant reference to the thefts and what followed. The Daily News on the other hand had a headline that read: “Old Books Yield Leaves of Grass”. Apologies to my mother, but I couldn’t have written a better headline.

 

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> VOLTAIRE. Œuvres complètes. [Kehl], Société littéraire et typographique, 1784-1789. 70 vol. €15,000 to €20,000.
    <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> <i>ENCYCLOPÉDIE MÉTHODIQUE…</i> Paris, Panckoucke ; Liège, Plompteux, 1782-1832. 254 volumes in-4. €10,000 to €12,000.
    <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> RUYSCH (FREDERIK). <i>Thesaurus anatomicus primus [–decimus]. Het eerste [–tiende] anatomisch cabinet.</i> Amsterdam, 1701-1716. €10,000 to €12,000.
    <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> [MARCELLO (CRISTOFORO)]. <i>Sacrarum cæremoniarum sive rituum ecclesiasticorum S. Rom. Ecclesiæ libri tres.</i> Venise, Giunta, 1582. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> [RABEL (DANIEL)]. <i>Theatrum Floræ, in quo ex toto orbe selecti mirabiles, venustiores, ac præcipui flores, tanquam ab ipsius deæ sinu proferuntur.</i> Paris, Pierre Firens, 1627. €3,000 to €4,000.
    <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> VALERIANO (PIEIRIO). <i>[Hieroglyphica, sive de sacris Ægyptiorum aliarumque gentium literis, commentariorum libri LVIII]…</i> Francfort, 1613-[1614]. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> BRUN (CLAUDE). [Cours manuscrit de Jérôme Dandini sur la Physique d'Aristote et disputes philosophiques des étudiants du collège jésuite de Bourges]. Conclusiones physic… 1579-1580. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> CLERISSEAU (CHARLES-LOUIS). <i>Antiquités de la France. Première partie.</i> [Monuments de Nismes]. Paris, 1778. €1,000 to €1,200.
    <b>ALDE, Dec. 20:</b> LE FÈVRE (L.-C.). <i>Grand escalier du château de Versailles, dit escalier des ambassadeurs, ordonné et peint par Charles Le Brun.</i> Paris, s.d. €800 to €1,000.
  • <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> KEPLER INVESTIGATES PLANETARY MOTION. KEPLER, JOHANNES. 1571-1630. $400,000 to $600,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> THE FINAL ILLUSTRATION OF POOH AND PIGLET IN THE HUNDRED ACRE WOOD. $250,000 to $350,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> GUTENBERG BIBLE LEAF. $60,000 to $90,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> ORTELIUS, ABRAHAM. 1527-1598. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> KNIGHT, HILARY. "Christmas Dinner at Maxime de la Falaise's" $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> GERSHWIN WORKING MUSICAL MANUSCRIPT PAGE FROM <i>OF THEE I SING.</i> $3,000 to $5,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> GILBERT, W.S. Original typed manuscript for <i>The Story of the Mikado.</i> $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> FINAL TYPED MANUSCRIPT FOR V.C. ANDREWS CLASSIC <I>FLOWERS IN THE ATTIC.</I> $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> ANNOTATED TYPESCRIPT DRAFT FOR KIPLING'S FINAL MOWGLI STORY. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> PRESENTATION COPY OF GUYS AND DOLLS. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> CHARLES DICKENS' CHINA INKWELL FEATURING A BEE READING, FROM GAD'S HILL. $6,000 to $8,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 13:</b> NELSON'S BATTLE PLAN FOR TRAFALGAR. $200,000 to $300,000
  • <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 14-15, 2022</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 14-15:</b> Two first editions by Adrian Spigelius in a Sammelband: <i>De humani corporis fabrica</i> from 1627 and <i>De formato foetu</i> from 1626. €15,000 to €20,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 14-15:</b> Splendid coloured copy by Frederick De Wit, <i>Atlas maior,</i> Amsterdam, 1705. €20,000 to €30,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 14-15:</b> First edition by Marco Ricci, <i>Varia Marci Ricci Pictoris prestantissimi Experimenta,</i> Venice, Orsolini, 1723-1730. €20,000 to €25,000.
    <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 14-15, 2022</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 14-15:</b> First edition by MicheleMarieschi, <i>Magnificentiores selectioresque Urbis Venetiarum prospectus,</i> Venice, 1741. €30,000 to €40,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 14-15:</b> Magnificent album by Louis-Leopold Boilly, Collection de dessins, calques et acquerelles, 1822. €20,000 to €25,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 14-15:</b> Rare musical score by Gioachino Rossini from 1858. €6,500 to €7,500.
  • <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books<br> December 8, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann December 8:</b> Friedrich Justin Bertuch, <i>Bilderbuch für Kinder,</i> Weimar, 1792, 1798, 1802, 1805, 1822. $1,200 to $1,800.
    <b>Swann December 8:</b> Sebastian Münster, <i>Novae Insulae XXVI Nova Tabula,</i> Basel, 1552. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Swann December 8:</b> Sebastian Münster & Hans Holbein, <i>Typus Cosmographicus Universales,</i> Basel, 1532. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann December 8:</b> Franz Unger, <i>Die Urwelt in Ihren Verschiedenen Bildungsperioden,</i> 16 tinted lithographed plates, Weigel, 1858. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Swann December 8:</b> Charles Varle, Wiliam Warner & Andrew Hanna, <i>Plan of the City of Environs of Baltimore,</i> Baltimore, 1801. $8,000 to $12,000.
  • <center><b>19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop<br>Catalogue 195<br>Magnificent Books & Manuscripts<br>Free on request</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop, Catalogue 195:</b> Benjamin Franklin on Electricity. Inscribed presentation copy.
    <b>19th Century Shop, Catalogue 195:</b> Frederick Douglass. Letter on civil war and the end of slavery.
    <b>19th Century Shop, Catalogue 195:</b> Carleton Watkins. A major American West photo album.
    <b>19th Century Shop, Catalogue 195:</b> Einstein. General Theory of Relativity inscribed by Einstein.
    <b>19th Century Shop, Catalogue 195:</b> The Federalist. Rare deluxe thick-paper copy.
    <b>19th Century Shop, Catalogue 195:</b> Emma Johnston. Archive of 350 salt prints by a Victorian female photographer.
  • <b><center>Doyle<br>The Collection of a New York Surveyor<br>December 16, 2022</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Collection of a New York Surveyor:</b> Lot 3. Francis M. Maerschalk. Manuscript plan of Philip Minthorne's land in Bowery 3. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Doyle, The Collection of a New York Surveyor:</b> Lot 30. William Bridges. A Map of a Block of Ground situate in Water Street between Walnut and Fir Streets. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Doyle, The Collection of a New York Surveyor:</b> Lot 4. Francis M. Maerschalk. M. Barrack Street/Road from Spring Garden to Fresh Water. $5,000-8,000
    <b>Doyle, The Collection of a New York Surveyor:</b> Lot 46. Love Lane. Map of Land and Buildings the property of Samuel I Tobias Esqr. $2,000-3,000
    <center><b>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>December 16, 2022</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 157. Stephen King. <i>Christine.</i> New York: Viking Press, 1983. First trade edition, inscribed by the author. $1,500-2,500
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 163. Charles Lindbergh. “We.” New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1927. First edition, Author’s Autograph Edition. $1,000-1,500
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 177. A.A. Milne. <i>Winnie-the-Pooh.</i> London: Methuen, 1926. First English trade edition, first impression. $1,000-1,500
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 196. William Shakespeare. <i>Othello, the Moor of Venice.</i> London: printed for W. Weak, 1681. $4,000-6,000
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 203. John Steinbeck. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York: Viking, 1939. First edition. $1,000-1,500

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