• <center><b>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>October 13, 2022</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 109. Miguel de Cervantes. <i>The History of Don-Quichote. The first parte.</i> London: William Stansby for Edward Blount, 1620. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 43. Franklin Delano Roosevelt. <i>Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill.</i> Washington: The White House, Christmastide, 1942. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 113. Charles Darwin. A collection of 26 titles including <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> $10,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 210. Philip Guston. Important correspondence between Philip Guston and Ralph and Martha Hyams. New York, 1967-76. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 26. John F. Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe. Signed guest book and original photos from the May 19, 1962 reception. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <center><b>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>October 13, 2022</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 194. J.R.R. Tolkien. <i>The Lord of the Rings Trilogy.</i> London: George Allen and Unwin, 1954-1954-1955. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 164. Max Beerbohm. Autograph Manuscript for The Happy Hypocrite, circa 1896. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 158. Mark Twain. <i>The Writings.</i> Hartford: American Publishing Company, 1899-1907. The Autograph Edition. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 150. Lady Dilke. <i>French Painters of the XVIIIth Century.</i> London: George Bell, 1899. First edition. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 200. Ludwig Bemelmans. Original sketch of Madeline, ink and gouache. $4,000 to $6,000.
  • <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> JOYCE, James. <i>Ulysses.</i> London: John Lane the Bodley Head, 1937. PRESENTATION COPY OF THE FIRST ENGLISH EDITION PRINTED IN ENGLAND. $50,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [SHACKLETON, Ernest]. –– BROWNING, Robert. <i>Poetical Works of…</i> London: Smith and Elder, 1906. PRESENTED TO SHACKLETON AND THE OFFICERS OF THE NIMROD BY A MEMBER OF THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> AUDUBON, John James. <i>The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> New York: George R. Lockwood, [1870]. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> ARISTOTLE. Opera, in Greek, parts one and two only: Organon and Natural Philosophy I. Edited by Aldus and others. Venice: Aldus Manutius, 1 November 1495–February 1498. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> COOK, James, Capt. [Collected Voyages]. First and Second Voyages: London: W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, 1773, 1777; Third Voyage: London: H. Hughes for G. Nicol and T. Cadell, 1785. $14,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> CLEMENS, Samuel Langhorne (“Mark Twain”). <i>The Writings of…</i> Hartford: American Publishing Co., 1899–1900. $12,000 to $16,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. SHAKESPEARE, William. <i>The Poems of…</i> Edited by Frederick S. Ellis. Hammersmith: William Morris for the Kelmscott Press, 1893. $12,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> LONDON, Jack. <i>The Call of the Wild.</i> New York: The Macmillan Company, 1905. PRESENTATION COPY INSCRIBED BY LONDON. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> CROWLEY, Aleister (1875–1947). <i>The Winged Beetle.</i> London: privately printed, 1910. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> WILDE, Oscar (“C.3.3.”). <i>The Ballad of Reading Gaol.</i> London: Leonard Smithers, January 1898. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> DRYDEN, John. <i>Fables Ancient and Modern; translated into verse from Homer, Ovid, Boccace, & Chaucer: with original poems.</i> London: John Tonson, 1700. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [MAP]. LINSCHOTEN, Jan Huygen van. <i>Delineatio Orarum Maritimarum…</i> London: John Wolfe, 1598. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <b><center>Gonnelli Auction House<br>Books, Autographs & Manuscripts<br>11th-12th of October 2022
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Alfieri Vittorio, <i>Vita [...] scritta da esso,</i> 1968. Starting Price: €900,00.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Collection of 25 albumin photographs depicting Italian, French and Swiss places. Late 19th century.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Brandolini D’Adda Brandolino, Duale. <i>Poesia [...] e incisioni di Sandro Martini,</i> 1976.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Alighieri Dante, <i>La divina commedia di Dante</i> edizione illustrata da 30 fotografie tolte da disegni di Scaramuzza, 1879. Starting Price: €500,00.
    Gonnelli Oct. 12th: Cervantes Saavedra Miguel (de), <i>El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha.</i> Nueva edicion corregida por la Real Academia Española, 1780. Starting price: €12.000,00.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Collodi Carlo, <i>Le avventure di Pinocchio. Storia di un burattino,</i> 1883. Starting price: €6.000,00.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Wilde Oscar, <i>The Picture of Dorian Gray [...]</i> with original images & notes on the text by Jim Dine, 1968. Starting price: €1.500,00
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> The smallest tarot cards in the world. 21st century.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - March - 2019 Issue

Karl Lagerfeld, Fashion Designer, Book Collector Extraordinaire, Dies

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Karl Lagerfeld in his library.

When Karl Lagerfeld died at the age of 85 a few days ago, the world knew him as a fashion designer. He had been creating fashion designs since the 1950s and his reputation was second to none. Since the 1980s, he headed up the House of Chanel, while having his own brand under his name. Lagerfeld was known for his dark sunglasses, ponytail, and iconoclastic ways. He was quoted as saying, "I don't know what normal means." For those of us who do know what it means, we can say that Lagerfeld was not "normal." However, that is not because of his ponytail, sunglasses, or fashion designs. It is because of his book collection. That was not normal.

 

The most legendary of abnormal book collectors was the eccentric 19th century collector Thomas Phillipps. He supposedly wanted one of everything. He was said to own 100,000 books and manuscripts. They filled up every room of his house, floor to ceiling, leaving barely enough space to move around. Lagerfeld bettered Phillipps threefold. His library contained 300,000 books. At least that was the number he gave. I don't know whether anyone ever counted them. Unlike Phillipps, who tried to collect a copy of everything on a limited budget, Lagerfeld made enough money to build a collection this large, so we will accept his estimate as reasonable.

 

Karl Lagerfeld was quoted as saying of his collection, "Today, I only collect books; there is no room left for something else. If you go to my house, I’ll have you walk around the books. I ended up with a library of 300,000. It’s a lot for an individual." Yes, it is. It sounds like an obsession. It also sounds like tsundoku. That is an adopted Japanese word because there is no English equivalent. It means acquiring a whole lot of books or other reading material but never reading it. Lagerfeld was said to be a voracious reader, but I doubt he read 300,000 books. That would require reading almost ten books a day from the day he was born.

 

Lagerfeld's library came complete with rolling ladders and spiral staircases. It is not easy to store 300,000 books. When you look at the picture of Lagerfeld in his library, you will notice something else distinctive about it besides size. The books are shelved horizontally rather than vertically. I have seen two explanations. One is that they take up less space that way, which makes absolutely no sense since they take up the same number of square feet no matter how you stack them. The other was that it is easier to read the titles that way. You don't have to crick your neck sideways. That sounds like a practical answer, but Lagerfeld was not noted for being a practical man. My guess is it was artistic, a fashion statement. Recently, those who design homes by installing "books by the foot" for homeowners who practice tsundoku have started stacking them horizontally, believing that looks better. Lagerfeld was always ahead of others in his fashion sense, so that seems the more logical explanation for his unusual method of stacking books.

 

Has there ever been a larger private book collector? If Lagerfeld possessed a collection three times the size of Phillipps, it is hard to imagine there being such a person. However, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, Lagerfeld was small time. It says that John Q. Benham of Avoca, Indiana, has a collection of over 1.5 million books. Guinness claims they fill up his house, a six-car garage, and a two-story building, while others are kept under tarpaulins outside. Guinness supposedly is diligent in fact-checking the record claims they publish, but it is hard to imagine they sent someone out to Avoca to count the books.

 

As to what becomes of Lagerfeld's collection now that he is gone, that is not known. Nor have I seen any numbers as to what the value of his books would be. Phillipps' material was sold over a series of auctions that did not conclude until almost a century later. It will be a challenge.


Posted On: 2019-03-01 07:17
User Name: mairin

An informative, enjoyable piece on the little-known Lagerfeld book collection. Or was it a library? A book archive? A book horde? What was it, really? Thanks for this, Mike, I was hoping Rare Book Hub would cover the subject. And we all appreciate being educated on "tsundoku", it applies to a good many people most of us know (accumulators of books, not readers, certainly not connoisseur collectors). These are a special class of bibliomaniac who love the physicality of books for their own sake: book as 'seductive' object, let's say. As for the sheer vastness of Lagerfeld's collection (if it indeed be that), some quantity of those volumes could be accumulated unsold inventory from his Paris bookshop, Studio 7L. Nice job, Mike, shows a good touch with the material, not least Sir Thomas Phillipps.
- Maureen E. Mulvihill, Collector / Guest Writer, 2016 - .


Posted On: 2019-03-01 16:39
User Name: Otakahira

We should all lend a passing thought to the plight of the "heirs and assigns" who may eventually have to wade into our bookshelves, performing a daunting triage as they attempt to save what's valuable, often under time pressure . . . even if we haven't quite reached 100,000. Not even a passing mention of how the value of books can be reduced through "spine roll," if they're not only STORED horizontally, but STACKED horizontally? -- Vin Suprynowicz


Posted On: 2019-03-27 14:22
User Name: cindyr

Nice article. I think you can fit more books in the same space if you stack them horizontally, because you can use nearly 100% of the vertical space, up to the bottom of the next shelf. The books themselves do not "take up less space", of course, as they are the same size, but it is a more efficient use of the space you have.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Printed & Manuscript Americana<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Extensive archive of papers of Lincoln’s Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> George Catlin, <i>North American Indian Portfolio,</i> 1844. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> The Twenty-Four Books of the Holy Scriptures, Carefully Translated…after the Best Jewish Authorities, Philadelphia, 1853-54. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Printed & Manuscript Americana<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Wedding book of Eleanor Roosevelt’s bodyguard, Earl Miller, signed by the Roosevelts, 1932. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Textile titled <i>The Resignation of Pres’t Washington,</i> Scotland, circa 1800. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Gideon Welles, Pass for President Lincoln’s White House funeral, 1865. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Confirmation of arms and nobility in favor of the Diez y Mora family, Madrid, 1710. $2,500 to $3,500.
  • <b><center>Sotheby’s<br>Antiquarian Books<br>Including a series of views of Milan<br>September 27 to October 4</b></center>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Livius, Historia Romanae decades, Venice, Vindelinus de Spira, 1470, contemporary Morocco. €30,000 to €40,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Blaeu, Nieuw Stedeboeck van Italien (Piemont), The Hague, 1724-1725, 8 volumes, marbled calf gilt. €70,000 to €90,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Baysio, Rosarium decretorum, Venice, 1481, later vellum. €10,000 to €15,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> [Niccolò da Poggibonsi], Viaggio da Venetia al santo Sepulchro, Venice, 1529, later half calf. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Hieronymus, Epistole [Italian], Ferrara, 1497, blue crushed morocco with the Rocco di Torrepadula arms. €12,000 to €15,000.

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