• <b>Morton Subastas: Auction of Books by Explorers and Travelers, Maps, Landscapes, Science, and Religion<br>Tuesday, January 28th, 2020<br>5:00 p.m. (CST)</b>
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> Darwin, Charles. <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> London, 1859. First Edition. Letter Addressed to Dr. Ogle and Envelope Signed by Charles Darwin. $278,000 to $333,000.
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> Ortelij, Abrahami. <i>Epitome Theatri Orbis Terrarum.</i> Antuerpiae: Exstat in Officina Plantinian, 1612. Rare Edition. $5,560 to $6,670.
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> González de Mendoza, Juan. <i>Histoire du Grand Royaume de la Chine, Situé Aux Indes Orientales.</i> [Genève]: 1606. $1,670 to $2,230.
    <b>Morton Subastas: Auction of Books by Explorers and Travelers, Maps, Landscapes, Science, and Religion<br>Tuesday, January 28th, 2020<br>5:00 p.m. (CST)</b>
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> Chapman, Conrad Wise. <i>Landscape of the Valley of Mexico.</i> Oil on wood. Signed and dated. $26,120 to $30,560.
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> <i>Thesaurus Exorcismorum...</i> Coloniae, 1608. Collection of Six Works of the Most Important Franciscan Exorcists of the 16th Century. $1,670 to $2,230.
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> <i>Saggio delle Transazioni Filosofiche della Società Regia.</i> Napoli, 1729-1734. With a Map of California by Eusebio Kino. $1,120 to $1,440.
    <b>Morton Subastas: Auction of Books by Explorers and Travelers, Maps, Landscapes, Science, and Religion<br>Tuesday, January 28th, 2020<br>5:00 p.m. (CST)</b>
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> Scherer, Heinrich. <i>Delineatio Nova et Vera Partis Australis Novi Mexici, cum Australi Parte Insulae Californiae...</i> Münich, ca. 1700. $850 to $1,120.
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> Santacilia, Jorge Juan-Ulloa, Antonio de. <i>A Voyage to South America. Describing at Large, the Spanish Cities...</i> London, 1760. $890 to $1,120.
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> Limborch, Philippi. <i>Historia Inquisitionis Cui Subjungitur Liber Sententiarum Inquisitionis Tholosanae...</i> Amsterdam, 1692. $1,340 to $1,670.
    <b>Morton Subastas: Auction of Books by Explorers and Travelers, Maps, Landscapes, Science, and Religion<br>Tuesday, January 28th, 2020<br>5:00 p.m. (CST)</b>
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> Castro, C. - Campillo, J. - Cumplido, I. - Lauda, L. - Rodríguez G. <i>Mexico and Its Surroundings.</i> Méx, 1855-56. $5,000 to $5,560.
    <b>Morton Subastas, Jan. 28:</b> <i>Medical Gazette. Periodical of the National Academy of Medicine of Mexico...</i> México, 1864 - 1943. Pieces: 169. $1,340 to $1,560.
  • <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>January 28, 2020</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> <i>Byblia in vulgar ultimamente impressa,</i> illustrated, folio, Lazaro de Soardi & Bernardino Benali, Venice,1517. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Milio (Agostino). <i>Nuovo dialogo delle devozioni del sacro monte della Verna,</i> FIRST and ONLY EDITION, illustrated, 4to, Stamperia Ducale, Florence, 1568. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Ulysses,</i> First English edition, NUMBER 23 OF 2000 COPIES, , 4to, Egoist Press, Paris, 1922. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Dumas (Marlene). <i>Doornrosie,</i> lithograph printed in colours, signed, 370 x 440 mm, 1989. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Japanese Culture.- Kimbei (Kusakabe). Two albums of hand tinted albumen prints, each with 50 photos, each photo c.140 x 95mm, [late 19th century]. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Miró (Joan) ARR. <i>Personnages sur Fond Noir,</i> NUMBER 38 OF 75 COPIES, lithograph, signed and dated, 305 x 445mm, 1948. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Ray (Man). Autoportrait, photolithograph, initialled and inscribed by artist, ONE of 100 COPIES, 200 x 160mm, 1972. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Wou-Ki (Zao). L'tang / The Pond, etching aquatint, number 2 of 3 only, signed by artist, 260 x 230 mm, Paris, Editions Galanis, 1972. £800 to £1,200.
    <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Autographs & Memorabilia<br>January 28, 2020</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> De Amicis (Edmondo). Postcards signed by Italian author and journalist Edmondo De Amicis, February 1897- August 1907. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Live Aid.- Live Aid 1985 souvenir programme, signed by Bob Geldof, Cliff Richard, Paul McCartney, Linda McCartney, Freddie Mercury, and others, 1985-1991. £3,000 to £4,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> 1944 Commonwealth Prime Ministers' Conference. Black and white, landscape photograph ft. all the Heads of Government of the British Commonwealth who attended the 1944 Prime Ministers' Conference in London, signed by all.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Walt Disney Production.- Dopey, original animation cel from Snow White approx. 180 x 180mm., Walt Disney Enterprises, 1937. £1,500 to £2,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Liszt (Franz). Carte-de-visite photograph by J.Ganz of Brussels of Franz Liszt, signed, 10 x 6.4cm, c. 1880. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Jan. 28:</b> Fermi (Enrico). Autograph letter signed to Professor Tullio Levi Civita, 8vo, Florence, 9 May 1925; w/an autograph note from Professor Civita, 7 March 1934 (2). £1,800 to £2,200.
  • <b>Bonhams:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>Measure for Measure</i> (extracted from the First Folio). London, 1623. Sold for $52,575.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL. <i>Fanshawe, A Tale.</i> Boston, 1828. FIRST EDITION OF AUTHOR'S FIRST BOOK. Sold for $47,575.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> THOREAU, HENRY DAVID. <i>Walden; Or, Life in the Woods.</i> Boston, 1854. FINE COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION. Sold for $12,575.
    <b>Bonhams: </b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies.</i> London, 1685. THE FOURTH FOLIO, Brewster/Bentley issue. Sold for $43,825.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> STEIG, WILLIAM. Original maquette and 58 finished drawings for <i>The Agony in the Kindergarten,</i> one of Steig's most important books. Sold for $12,575.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> KING, STEPHEN. <i>Carrie.</i> New York, 1974. INSCRIBED FIRST EDITION, OF AUTHOR'S FIRST BOOK. Sold for $1,912.50.
    <b><center>Bonhams<br>Consignments invited (2020)</b>
    <b>Bonhams:</b> APPLE MACINTOSH PROTOTYPE. 1983. The earliest known Macintosh with "Twiggy" drive, one of only two known working machines. Sold for $150,075.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> LOVELACE, AUGUSTA ADA. Sketch of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage Esq. London, 1843. FIRST EDITION, JOURNAL ISSUE, MOST IMPORTANT PAPER IN EARLY DIGITAL COMPUTING. Sold for $15,075.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> APPLE-1 COMPUTER. Signed by Steve Wozniak, used in development of Apple II. Sold for $175,075.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. 1809-1882. <i>On the Origin of Species By Means of Natural Selection.</i> London, 1859. FIRST EDITION. Sold for $131,325.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> BOOLE, GEORGE. <i>An Investigation of the Laws of Thought.</i> London, 1854. Sold for $12,575.
    <b>Bonhams:</b> SHANNON, CLAUDE and WARREN WEAVER. <i>The Mathematical Theory of Communication.</i> Urbana, 1949. Sold for $27,575.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2018 Issue

FIRSTS - Bibliography Made Easy

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FIRSTS - The Book Collector’s Magazine excels in popular bibliography.

You'd think that 20 years into the digital age there would be no place for a printed magazine devoted mostly to bibliography of books, mostly from the late 19th century to the present day, but you'd be wrong.

 

FIRSTS - the Book Collector's Magazine, established in 1991 by Robin and Kathryn Smiley, is still going strong and still a good place to turn as a convenient reference for those collecting specific authors or genres. The Tuscon, AZ based publication comes out six times a year; almost without exception each issue is a keeper.

 

Now in their 28th year the magazine has a paid circulation of about 1,500 subscribers and a well honed format which typically includes one or two longish biographical articles on a writer of note or a genre such as mysteries, science fiction, or children's books, followed by a checklist of important titles. The checklist gives first and important editions, points, notes and related values. All of it is well illustrated with photos of the books discussed. From time to time the magazine looks back at past featured authors and their works and updates the estimated market values. It also has a regular column called “Points” that answers particular questions sent in by readers. "Books into Film" has been a standing feature since the magazine’s inception. It typically profiles a well known book and gives details of how it was made into a motion picture.

 

Editor Kathryn Smiley recently spoke with Rare Book Hub about the evolution and staying power of their publication. She said that she and her husband Robin (or the "Bearded One" as she called him) were originally magazine print brokers based in LA when a client mentioned there would be a book fair in the city. The couple attended what turned out to be an ABAA event. They were hooked.

 

"It opened a whole new world,” she said, “we went from buyers to collectors, and we immediately started to look for education. The need to know more evolved into FIRSTS. It started as a monthly, tapered off a little to ten times a year and in 2014 reduced its schedule to six issues a year.

 

Authors and topics that have proved popular with FIRST readers include Ian Fleming, Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, as well as Western Americana, and Naval Fiction. But the list of popular bibliography they have published is wide and deep and includes practically every writer you’ve ever heard of and some you haven’t.

 

She also noted that they typically print an overrun of several hundred so that the back issues are still in print. Back issues from 1991-to 1995 are $12 per copy while more recent ones are $10 apiece. An annual subscription is $40/year.

 

While the biographical and topical articles are well done, it's the checklists that give the magazine its unique appeal. "Robin gets most credit in that department," she said, "he’s a born list maker, and an enthusiastic one at that. When he gets interested he dives in headlong."

 

"It's hard to write about books you haven't actually handled and read," Smiley said. The couple buy as many of the books they write about as they can, "We keep the ones we want and sell the others."

 

When they lived in California we would "take all the books we didn’t want to keep to an annual sale, that took care of a lot. But since we moved to Arizona, 24 years ago, there's not as much interest hereabout, and as a result, we're bursting at the seams with books."

 

They write about, "whatever catches our fancy, but really it's not that random… We like to venture outside of the standard Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Steinbeck territory. If we just stuck to those kind of books we'd be bored in no time." Publishing FIRSTS, she said, has been "a wonderful voyage of discovery. "

 

Among the upcoming topics are articles/checklists about biographer Richard Holmes, Ben Franklin, and Children's Books to name a few. While the pair seems to write most of the issues themselves, there are also a good many articles from outside contributors, and the masthead lists a distinguished group of booksellers as an advisory board, many of whom are also advertisers. Smiley said they research values “by looking at what's offered by people we know or we know of.”

 

Their advice to collectors is not to look at books as an investment. “Collect what you love; if it appreciates, swell, if it doesn’t, so be it. Their own personal taste runs to opera. "We have a huge collection in all formats."

 

Like the Smileys, many of their collector friends are getting older. "We get about one call a week about downsizing," she said. A letter of advice from FIRSTS on the subject of selling your collection is at the end of this article.

 

"I don’t have a sense of where the market's going,” she said, “and I’m not concerned.” She's sick of "urban angst", she doesn't do podcasts or text, hates eBooks, admits that the internet has caused major changes in the world of books, but for herself, “I don’t want to spend anymore time than necessary looking at a screen.” On making a living she said, "Money is nice but it's not my primary focus.”

 

"The world changes,” she said, “but I can predict there will always be people who love books, not just as literature but as physical objects….We love what we do and we'll just keep on keeping on."

 

Link: firstsmagazine.com

 

 

 

Slightly edited advice from FIRSTS on downsizing:

 

A few years ago we announced plans for a series of articles about how to sell books you no longer want to keep in your collection. We cancelled those plans when it became apparent that with the economy in such disarray and things in general changing at a rapid rate, any specific advice we could give was likely to be outdated before we could publish it.

 

But since the inquiries keep coming in, we’ve put together this list of things to keep in mind about selling your books. We cannot act as appraisers or agents in this process, but we hope this information will be of help.

 

Ask yourself these questions, and answer them honestly: Do I know today’s market value for the books I want to sell (not what you paid for them years ago or what you think or wish they’re worth), and how much under that am I willing to accept for any or all of them? How much work do I want to do, and how much personal contact do I want to have with potential buyers?

 

Theoretically, you’ll do the most work and receive the highest prices if you sell books to another collector. It will require research, compiling inventory lists, making contact through advertising or an Internet listing service (which itself will require registering with that service, learning how to use it and paying its fees) and packing and shipping small lots. It’s highly unlikely you’ll sell all your books to one buyer, so this will require a lot of time and effort and contact with many individuals.

 

You’ll do the least work and receive the lowest price if you sell the lot to a bookseller. As with any other enterprise, booksellers must be able to make a profit on the books they buy—it’s how they make a living. They cannot pay you full market value for your books if they are to stay in business.

 

They also cannot afford to tie up large amounts of money in books for which they have no customers, so they are much more likely to buy books they know they can sell right away.

 

In addition, the value of many books has declined. This is simply a function of the supply-and-demand aspect of the marketplace: it happens with any collectible or commodity. If you decide to go this route, our best advice right now is that you make a descriptive list of your best books and mail or email it, along with a letter of inquiry, to a wide range of booksellers. Start with our advertisers: they are all reputable professionals, most of whom we know personally.

 

Auction houses are another possibility for selling your books. Just make sure you’re fully informed and completely clear about their fees and terms of sale and payment before signing on.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27:</b> [Paine, Thomas]. Common Sense; Addressed to the Inhabitants of America… Philadelphia: R. Bell, 1776. $200,000 to $250,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Autograph letter signed, to Joshua Reed Giddings, 21 May 1860. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27:</b> Oakley, Annie. <i>A Brief Sketch of Her Career and Notes on Shooting.</i> [N.p.]: ca. 1913, Signed. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27:</b> Washington, George. One autograph letter signed & 3 letters signed to General Alexander McDougall, September 1777. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27:</b> Mather, Cotton. <i>The Wonders of the Invisible World. Being an account of the tryals of several witches...</i> London: 1693. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27:</b> James, Benjamin.<i><br>A Treatise on the Management of the Teeth.</i> Boston, 1814. $2,000 to $3,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Emil Cardinaux, <i>Winter in der Schweiz,</i> 1921. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Evelyn Rumsey Carey, <i>Pan American Exposition / Niagara / Buffalo,</i> 1901. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Arnost Hofbauer, <i>Topicuv Salon,</i> 1898. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Job,</i> 1896. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Georges de Feure, <i>Le Journal des Ventes,</i> 1898. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Cycles Perfecta,</i> 1897. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Edward Penfield, <i>Orient Cycles / Lead the Leaders,</i> circa 1895. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Adrien Barrère, <i>L’Ideal du Touriste,</i> 1903. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Willem Frederick Ten Broek, <i>New York / Wereldtentoonselling / Holland – Amerika Lijn,</i> 1938. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Dwight Clark Shepler, <i>Sun Valley / Union Pacific.</i> $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Sascha Maurer, <i>Flexible Flyer Splitkein / Smuggler’s Notch,</i> circa 1935. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 13:</b> Louis Bonhajo, <i>Vote / League of Women Voters,</i> 1920. $2,000 to $3,000.

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