• <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> De Wit’s composite atlas with magnificent full original color. $125,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Gardner's photographic sketch book of the Civil War. $200,000 to $250,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Waugh Oil Painting, 70 Degrees North; The Polar Bear. $400,000 to $600,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Audubon aquatint, Ivory-Billed Woodpecker. $75,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Blaeu terrestrial table globe, 1602. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Audubon aquautint, Ruby-Throated Humming Bird. $35,000 to $45,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Bessa original watercolor of a bouquet of flowers. $75,000 to $125,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> John Gould's only work devoted to American birds. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Wyld & Malby pair of terrestrial & celestial globes, 1833. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Leutze map of the world oil painting. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Caula, the finest 18th century drawing of Lison. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Scolari / Blaeu map of Germania, 1650. $15,000 to $22,000.
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Books and Manuscripts:<br>19th and 20th Century<br>Online through December 14</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Now to Dec. 14:</b> J.R.R. Tolkien. <i>The Hobbit, or There and Back Again,</i> first edition, PRESENTATION COPY, 1937. £15,000 to £20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Now to Dec. 14:</b> William Blake. <i>Songs of Innocence and of Experience,</i> c.1832. £50,000 to £70,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Now to Dec. 14:</b> Ian Fleming. <i>Casino Royale.</i> London: Jonathan Cape, 1953, first edition.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Books and Manuscripts:<br>19th and 20th Century<br>Online through December 14</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Now to Dec. 14:</b> George Orwell. <i>Down and Out in Paris and London,</i> 1933, inscribed to Mabel Fierz. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Now to Dec. 14:</b> J.K. Rowling. <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.</i> London: Bloomsbury, 1997. Red morocco binding, first edition. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Now to Dec. 14:</b> J.K. Rowling. <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.</i> London: Bloomsbury, 1997, first edition. £40,000 to £60,000.
  • <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Ortelius (Abraham). <i>Theatrum Orbis Terrarum,</i> folio, Antwerp, 1570, First Edition (2nd Issue), 53 double-page maps, contemporary hand colouring. €40,000 to €60,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> An original engraved facsimile copy of the Declaration of Independence of 4 July 1776, issued by order of Congress on 4 July 1823 in a limited edition of 200 copies on fine parchment. €20,000 to €30,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Ulysses.</i> Shakespeare & Co., Rue de l’Odeon, Paris 1922. No. 559 of 1000 Copies of the First Edn.,, one of 750 Copies on handmade paper. €10,000 to €15,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Malton (James) [1761-1803]. A fine quality set of twenty-five hand coloured aquatint Views of Dublin, as published for <i>A Picturesque and Descriptive View of the City of Dublin</i>. €6,000 to €7,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> 'Bloody Sunday.' An original Admission Ticket to Croke Park, Great Challenge Match (Football), Tipperary v. Dublin, Sunday, November 21,1920. Pink card, 3 ins x 4 ¼ ins. €4,000 to €5,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Haveth Childers Everywhere - Fragment from Work in Progress,</i> Paris & N.Y., 1930, First Edn., Signed and Limited No. 50 (100) Copies. €4,000 to €6,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Edward Lyons, Irish (1726-1801). Genealogy: <i>The FitzGerald's Arms of Carton House, Kildare,</i> pen and ink and watercolour on laid paper. €3,000 to €4,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Yeats (William Butler). <i>Poems.</i> Cuala Press, D. 1935, stiff blue paper covers, unlettered as issued, coloured initials and ornaments hand-drawn by Elizabeth Corbet Yeats. One of 300 copies. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> A fine and important collection of Ulster Wit. Belfast Political Scrapbook, 19th century. €1,500 to €2,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Rare Views of the Giant's Causeway. Coloured Prints: Drury (Susanna) [1698-1770]. A rare pair of original Engraved Prints. €1,200 to €1,500.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> [Johnson (Rev. Samuel)]. <i>Julian the Apsostate Being a Short Account of his Life, together with a Comparison of Popery and Paganism,</i> L., 1682, First Edn. €800 to €1,200.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Aringhi (Pauli). <i>Roma Subterranea Novissima,</i> 2 vols. lg. folio Rome (Typis Vitalis Mascardi) 1651. €350 to €750.
  • <b><center>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Entertainment and Sports Auction<br>December 9th</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> SITTING BULL SIGNED PHOTO (The Finest in Existence).
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> The Beatles Signed Photo Card and the Make-Up Sponge Used During the Historic February 1964 Ed Sullivan Performance.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Extremely Rare John Wesley Hardin Signature from a Texas Cattle Brand Book, early 1870s.
    <b><center>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Entertainment and Sports Auction<br>December 9th</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Albert Einstein "refugee intellectuals of the Hitler persecution.”
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> LYNDON B. JOHNSON Personally Owned & Worn STETSON HAT.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Sigmund Freud Typed Letter Signed in English "I am still on the road to health, but I have not arrived."
    <b><center>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Entertainment and Sports Auction<br>December 9th</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Nixon’s All Time Baseball All Star Team and the Reporter that helped change the 1972 Presidential Election!
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Incredible signed ''Atomic Energy for Military Purposes'' -by Enrico Fermi & Robert Oppenheimer and- Also Signed by Four Other Manhattan Project Scientists Who Developed the First Atomic Bomb.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Samuel Adams, Signer of Declaration Of Independence, Signed Military Appointment.
    <b><center>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Entertainment and Sports Auction<br>December 9th</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Orville Wright & Glenn Martin Signed Photograph.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Thomas Jefferson, a Magnificent Large Signature.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Robert E. Lee ALS, “Suffering people of the South … blessing of God.”

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - November - 2017 Issue

Exiting the Bookseller Business

D0276d0e-4cdd-457c-9800-9d0413e6c73a

Material still in the hands of Marc Carrel

 

An Editor's Introduction by Bruce McKinney

 

New dealers are a healthy sign for the rare book field and often enough new men and women enter the trade, often having apprenticed with established dealers and found the process and the prospects appealing.  For retiring dealers the process is more somber for what began as a hopeful venture often turns out to be more difficult and complicated than was earlier envisioned.  Nevertheless, many weather the process and find success.

 

Marc Sena Carrel became a used and rare book dealer in 2003 and is wrapping up his bookselling enterprise in 2018.  He has been trying different approaches with varying degrees of success and now stands on the precipice of the final stage, more aggressive price cutting.  His story is both interesting and illustrative for he has been careful.

 

The books that remain in his inventory are very good copies and his prices appropriate to selling slowly over years.  But his closeout assumes both bulk buyers and seller flexibility because a closeout is like a timed offer and the offers will be percentages of asking prices.

 

We suggested to Marc that he write up his story in the first person.  This is his story but it also the story of other dealers who have sold, as well as being illustrative for dealers who will someday sell or liquidate.  The names and the books change but the emotional thread that runs through his experience is the same thread that has run through the trade for hundreds of years.

 

His story.

 

Exiting the Bookseller Business:

How One SF Bay Area Seller is Going about It

 

by Marc Sena Carrel

 

After 14 years as a specialty bookseller, an autumn of life pursuit, I am planning to close down my book business, The Book Carrel, in the months ahead. It’s an attractive and select inventory, in my humble opinion, and is on offer including book descriptions and photos, more about which later. Closing shop is a bittersweet experience but the time has come. It’s a daunting prospect in some ways but liberating in other ways.

 

I hope this article will serve as informal guidance for experienced dealers anticipating closing down their book biz for whatever reasons as well as something to ponder for novices contemplating a dive into the world of used book shop operations.

 

First a bit of background…. Going into the book trade in 2003 was a natural, after a lifetime of book collecting while working in a variety of fields, some book related, others not. As a young man I worked as a draft counselor and legal aide, spent some years as a Hollywood extra and print model, then worked as a copy editor and proofreader, later taught ESL and US Civics in the public school system, and eventually worked for many years as an investigator and mediator for a federal civil rights law enforcement agency. Throughout all that time, since my late teens to the recent past, I was at home in the world of books.

 

As a bookseller I’ve been focused on carrying a wide variety of art, design and archaeology books. This includes volumes on painting, prints, sculpture, theater, dance, opera, architecture, landscape, interiors, fine furniture, antiques, and more, with a special emphasis on Chinese and Japanese arts and antiquities, but also with representative holdings in European and American art.

 

My bookseller holdings have been modest by sheer number. I’ve carried about 8,000 titles over the course of 14 years. But I’ve always been attracted to niche markets and out-of-the-mainstream books and have preferred to focus on a small stock of select titles. I’ve aimed for the scholarly and rare, even the obscure, and insofar as possible avoided mass market stock. (The books, prints and ephemera in the accompanying illustrations will give you a notion of what I mean.) Admittedly, though, the battle of quality versus quantity is a difficult one for the bookseller.

 

I have always operated as a sole proprietor. And, for what it’s worth, I am not and have never been a brick-and-mortar shop. I’ve always been an online-only presence. Also, curmudgeon or not, I’ve never had a presence on social media and never wanted to.

 

So how does a small volume bookman in my situation – or bookwoman, as the case may be – go about closing shop? More specifically, how does the bookseller find bulk buyers for remaining inventory? Well, let me share my recent experience.

 

I began planning my exit at the end of 2016, anticipating needing a full year to comb through my stock, save favorite items for my personal library, determine what to donate, decide what to shop out to auction houses, and identify and reach out to potential buyers, whether dealers, institutions or collectors.

 

As to very low price-point books, and speaking strictly as an online seller, I’ve found they are often more trouble to stock and ship than they are worth, and so I had no problem donating hundreds of such books earlier in the year. These will be used as tax deductions based on charitable contributions.

 

Commencing several months ago I tried selling off select books, prints and ephemera at a couple of specialty auction houses in the US. Over the last ten years I’ve consigned books as far afield as Christie’s Paris and as close to home as Bonhams San Francisco. In fact I’ve been both a consignor and buyer at auctions since a teenager, for about fifty years, and so am no tyro at this. In the 21st century, though, business models for auction houses have been changing as rapidly as business models for book dealers. What’s more, there’s some evidence to suggest that whereas book collectors in the past tended to feel more comfortable buying from professional dealers, nowadays many book enthusiasts believe, rightly or wrongly, that they can do better buying at auction than from dealers.

 

To test the waters as to how best to sell off my remaining stock I committed a couple hundred books to various auctions this year. I included some attractive books worth $5,000 or more at retail and with few or no other copies on the market, along with books of just middling value and that are carried by multiple dealers. I shipped approximately 50 lots of select titles to the East Coast. The books sold over the course of four auctions starting in June. The results were not good... a bit under 25% of competitive market value. Incidentally, the long-overdue check from one of these venues, National Book Auctions, has not arrived as of this writing but I trust it will come eventually.

 

I also placed select titles at both ends of the price spectrum with auction houses closer to home. Those books, on average, did significantly better at auction. A few books did surprisingly well while others went for a song. Of course, generally speaking, an experienced consignor does not expect less-than-stellar books selling at auction to fetch estimated retail value but hopes to get close to it…. Or at least cover the initial investment and then some.

 

As to all auctions this year, taking into account the consignor premiums and the shipping fees, I broke even or exceeded my original purchase prices, with some exceptions. Considering the time and energy spent agreeing on acceptable titles and estimates, negotiating consignment terms, packing the books, mailing them off or carrying them in, and waiting on payment -- some houses, such as PBA Galleries, are much better than others in those respects -- a prospective book dealer going out of business should weigh whether it is worth the effort. It also must be said that, realistically, in today’s market it is a race to the bottom for many books. Only the truly rare and sought-after seem to be holding their value or increasing in value.

 

I’ve also tried offering discounted prices through intermediaries for limited time periods. For example a 40% discount sale on Biblio had no noticeable impact… but then again, few of my sales over the years have come through Biblio. AbeBooks -- now owned, alas, by Amazon -- would likely bring in more sales for me at a similar discount. Bear in mind that, in addition to losing the difference between the discounted price and the original list price, you still have to pay a commission on each intermediary sale.

 

Speaking matter-of-factly, reaching out to other book dealers has been mostly fruitless to date but success is largely a question of reaching a sufficiently large and receptive audience of savvy buyers who recognize fine, saleable and attractively-discounted books when they see them. Late last year the rare books department of Logos Books in Santa Cruz expressed interest in acquiring many of my books but by June of this year they suddenly went out of business. "John Livingston, the store’s owner and operator for its entire 48-year run, said that he put the store up for sale a year ago. Facing little interest and no serious offers, as well as sharply declining revenues, he has decided to close his business."

 

Many stores, such as Green Apple in San Francisco, Powell's in Portland, and Paragon Book Gallery in Chicago never bothered to reply to my repeat queries. Should we chalk this up to a lack of courtesy in an era that seems to foster increasingly self-centered behavior? “If I’m not seeing an advantage for me, why should I bother to reply?” Or are they perhaps just understaffed and overwhelmed?

 

We all know that many or even most of our fellow booksellers are professional and collegial, upholding the high standards of ABAA and IOBA, and will contact you whether or not your books are of interest and, if excited about your holdings, will negotiate with you in good faith. Swan’s Fine Books is exemplary, as is Jerry Shepard Bookseller, to mention a few. Some booksellers in the SF Bay Area with whom I have had direct conversations, including general interest as well as specialty or niche sellers, expressed moderate interest but regretted that cash flow problems prevented buying large groups of books or relatively costly books. This is certainly understandable.

 

By July I divided my inventory into a few carefully chosen categories, such as books on Chinese and Japanese art, antiquities and archaeology, some 400 volumes. I reached out to several special collections librarians at various colleges, universities and museums regarding those book collections. The few who answered, such as the head librarian at San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum, reported constrained budgets for book acquisition purposes. Incidentally, I was mostly careful to avoid soliciting large university libraries that have specialty collections of, say, 50,000 + volumes inasmuch as they probably already have many of the titles in my own inventory. Examples of the latter would be the East Asia Library at Stanford University and the C.V. Starr East Asian Library at U.C.Berkeley, to name but two.

 

There’s no doubt that excellent contacts for end-of-business sales purposes can be built up within the trade by ongoing and active participation in book fairs and exhibitions. I myself have never participated as a merchant in book fairs; my mobility impairment simply made this unrealistic. So I don’t have a wide group of show-based colleagues to notify by word of mouth of my impending business closure and the availability of remaining book stock. But, to state the obvious, the bookseller going out of business who has done book fairs on a regular basis will want to reach out to fellow booksellers met on the show circuit. There are, after all, quite a number of dealers who focus on dealer book shop closure sales as a primary means of obtaining fresh stock. Be aware, though, that most will try to offer pennies on the dollar. The art of the deal, Donald-style.

 

If you are contemplating closing shop, you might want to seek out electronic bulletin boards or Group Discussion ListServes, open to book dealers, and used by university libraries, museums and other institutions that are likely to be particularly interested in your holdings. Note, however, that many such boards specifically enjoin subscribers from listing notices that have a commercial purpose.

 

For those book shop proprietors who belong to a professional organization such as ABAA or IOBA, by all means advertise on the For Sale page of the organization’s ListServe, such as the Tradebooks Email List at IOBA.

 

Circumstances, of course, will vary for book store owners seeking to sell off remaining inventory. Some shop owners will have no interest in hanging on to their books or will lack storage space or will be pressed for whatever money they can get from selling off. I’m fortunate in that I have a decent federal pension and social security retirement income from previous jobs and I own a nice house and need not contemplate a fire sale of my inventory. I have space in my home to accommodate up to 2,500 volumes and I’m very interested in the subject matter of most of my books. I’ll fold them into my personal library if it comes to that.

 

Meanwhile I am happy to entertain all good faith purchase offers from serious buyers -- whether collectors, institutions or fellow dealers -- and will work collegially with them to obtain a win-win outcome. Offers can be for select groupings of books or for the entirety of the inventory. Note that the current competitive retail value of my remaining books -- about 1,100 volumes as of this writing -- is in the range of $225,000 to $250,000.

 

I pride myself on writing accurate and detailed descriptions for each book, print and ephemera item. I also have thousands of crisp color digital images of the items. All descriptions and photos will gladly be placed at the disposal of bulk buyers, to save the buyers considerable extra work; I am not at all possessive about such matters and will do what I reasonably can to help bulk buyers archive or resell the inventory.

 

If you want to take a close look at my remaining inventory you can view the items at www.bookcarrel.com

 

I’ve earlier observed that while closing shop can present a formidable challenge it can also bring about a feeling of release and satisfaction. Satisfaction in the narrow sense refers, for me, to relief from copious recordkeeping for income tax, sales tax, customer consignments and other purposes, relief from hauling about boxes of books that seem increasingly heavy over time, and the like relief.

 

But there’s a much larger sense of fulfillment. Whether or not you sell off remaining inventory at a price that meets your expectations and your needs, you can take satisfaction knowing that you, with efficiency and diligence, provided fine books over time to appreciative readers, contributing to their individual enlightenment and also to the general welfare of all peoples, promoting cultural literacy and ameliorating in some measure the human condition…. if that’s not too grand a note on which to close. Best wishes to those of you dedicated booksellers who will be going out of business in the months or years ahead. And strong encouragement to those, especially the young, just starting out on the path of fine book selling.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 16, 2021</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of hours of Jean Boutin]. Illuminated manuscript on vellum, use of Rome, in Latin and French. France, early 15th century. From €50,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of Hours]. Pontifical illuminated manuscript on parchment, in Latin. Southern France, late 15th century. From €40,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of Hours]. Illuminated manuscript on parchment, in Latin and French. France, late 15th century. From €40,000.
    <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 16, 2021</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of Hours]. Officium B. Mariae Virginis. Illuminated manuscript on parchment, use of Rome, in Latin and Italian. 1482. From €40,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of Hours]. Manuscript on parchment, in French. Amiens, 14th century. From €10,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> Verdi, Giuseppe. 9 handwritten lines signed by Luisa Miller, with a dedication 'to Monsieur Felix Le Couppey, Paris 24 Jan. 1852'. From €8,000.
    <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 16, 2021</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> French Renaissance binding, produced in Lyon or Paris in the second half of the 16th century. Rhetoricorum secundus tomus in Gryphius' edition of 1548. From €800.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Printing and the Mind of Man]. Gesner, Conrad. <i>Vogelbuch Darinn die art, natur und eigenschafft aller vöglen.</i> Zurigo, Froschauer, 1581, 1583, 1585, 1589. From €10,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Dalmatia]. Berlinghieri, Francesco. Tabula quinta de Europa. Florence, Niccolò di Lorenzo della Magna, [before September 1482]. From €8,000.
    <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 16, 2021</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> Giampiccoli, Giuliano. Jacobo Comiti Duratio […] Tabulas a Marco Ricci Auctore, Julianus Giampiccoli incidit. Venezia, Teodoro Viero, 1775. €30,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Piazzetta]. Pitteri, Marco. Studj di pittura gia dissegnati da Giambatista Piazzetta ed ora con l'intaglio di Marco Pitteri. Venezia, Giovanni Battista Albrizzi, 1760. From €4,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Printing and the Mind of Man]. Palladio, Andrea. <i>I quattro libri dell'architettura.</i> Venezia, Domenico de' Franceschi, 1570. From €14,000.
  • <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>15/16 December 2021<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs, Children’s Books & Playing Cards, Modern First Editions</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> British Isles. Waldseemuller (Martin), <i>Tabula Nova Hibernie Anglie et Scotie,</i> Strasbourg, 1513. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Americas. Speed (John), <i>America with those known parts in that unknowne worlde, both people and manner of Buildings. Discribed and inlarged by J. S.</i> 1626. £1,500 to £2,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Howitt (Samuel, and others). <i>Foreign Field Sports, Fisheries, Sporting Anecdotes... Containing 100 Plates. With a Supplement of New South Wales,</i> 1st edition, 2 parts in 1, London, 1814. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>15/16 December 2021<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs, Children’s Books & Playing Cards, Modern First Editions</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Thomson (Joseph). <i>Through Masai Land,</i> 1st edition, London: Sampson Low & Co, 1885. £600 to £800.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Johnson (Samuel). <i>A Dictionary of the English Language,</i> 2 volumes, 1st edition, London: W. Strahan for J. and P. Knapton, 1755. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Einstein (Albert). <i>Relativity. The Special and the General Theory,</i> 1st edition in English, London: Methuen, 1920. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>15/16 December 2021<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs, Children’s Books & Playing Cards, Modern First Editions</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Stoker (Bram). <i>Dracula,</i> 1st edition, 1st issue, London: Archibald Constable, 1897. £12,000 to £15,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Fleming (Ian). <i>Casino Royale,</i> 1st edition, 1st impression, 1st issue dust jacket, London: Jonathan Cape, 1953. £10,000 to £15,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Lewis (C.S.). <i>The Chronicles of Narnia,</i> 1st editions, London: Geoffrey Bles, 1950-56. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>15/16 December 2021<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs, Children’s Books & Playing Cards, Modern First Editions</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Herbert (Frank). <i>Dune,</i> 1st edition, 2nd issue, Philadelphia; Chilton Book Company, 1965. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Apollo 11. Man’s First Landing on the Moon Photograph Signed, 20 July 1969. £3,000 to £5,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Von Harbou (Thea). <i>Metropolis,</i> 1st edition in English, 1st issue, London: The Reader's Library, 1927. £700 to £1,000.
  • <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>December 9</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 47. Roosevelt, Theodore. Photograph inscribed to Morris J. Hirsch. May 7th 1918. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 178. Whitman, Walt. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York: [Printed for the author], 1955. First edition in the first issue binding. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 38. Mather, Cotton. <i>Magnalia Christi Americana; or, the Ecclesiastical History of New-England.</i> London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, 1702. First edition. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 55. Taylor, Zachary. Autograph letter signed as President-Elect. Baton Rouge: January 15, 1849. $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 203. Picasso, Pablo. <i>Verve</i> Vol. V, Nos. 19-20. Paris: Editions Verve, 1948. Inscribed on the title page by Picasso. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>December 9</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 211. Domergue, Jean-Gabriel. L'Ete a Monte Carlo. Lithographed poster, Lucien Serre & Cie, Paris, circa 1937. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 105. Manuscript Illumination attr. to Neri da Rimini. Large excised initial "N" from a choirbook, extensively historiated. [Likely Rimini: first quarter of the 14th century]. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 40. McKenney, Thomas L. and Hall, James. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs.</i> Philadelphia: Rice, Rutter & Co., 1870. $3,00
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 222. Searle, Ronald. [Pets--a dog, cats and a parrot-- surrounded by books, and inspecting a globe, perhaps planning global domination]. Original drawing, 17 3/8 x 13 1/2 inches. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 98. Faden, William; Scull, Nicholas and George Heap. A Plan of the City and Environs of Philadelphia, Survey'd by N. Scull and G. Heap. London: William Faden, 12 March 1777. $3,000 to $5,000.
  • <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. Autograph Letter Signed ("B. Franklin"), to Benjamin Vaughan asserting the primacy of American independence in negotiating the Treaty of Paris, Passy, July 11, 1782. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. Autograph Letter Signed ("B. Franklin") to David Hartley addressing Hartley's final issues with the recently completed ratification of the Treaty of Paris, Passy, June 2, 1784. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> MASON & DIXON. A hand-colored contemporary manuscript map titled in cartouche, "A Map of that Part of AMERICA where a degree of LATITUDE was measured for the ROYAL SOCIETY, by Chas Mason & Jer: Dixon," c.1768. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("WB Yeats"), a fair copy of "When Helen Lived" for John Preece headed ("For John Preece"), framed. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> "LINCOLN SEATED." KECK, CHARLES, sculptor. 1875-1951. Patinated bronze, 1950. Louise Taper Collection. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> ABRAHAM LINCOLN'S FINAL HOURS. BURNS, J., painter. <i>Death-Bed of Abraham Lincoln.</i> Oil on canvas, 1866. Collection of Louise Taper. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> FILSON, CHARLES PATTERSON, painter. 1860-1937. <i>Portrait of Edwin M. Stanton, Lincoln's Secretary of War.</i> $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> A MATZOS BOX PRESENTED BY THE MANISHEVITZ BROTHERS TO WARREN G. HARDING. Louise Taper Collection. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> LEWIS CARROLL. Original albumen print photograph, approximately 6 7/8 x 8 3/4 inches, Chelsea, London, October 7, 1863, of the Rossetti Family at home, one of only three known examples of the full image. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> CHRISTINA ROSSETTI. <i>Verses ... Dedicated to Her Mother.</i> Privately printed, 1847. First edition of her first book, printed at her grandfather's press, THE ROSSETTI FAMILY COPY. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> CHRISTINA ROSSETTI. Original drawing of snowdrops in purple pencil, sent by CGR to Lucy Rossetti, inscribed "I doubt whether you will make out my copy from nature," 1887. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI, et al. The Germ: <i>Thoughts towards Nature in Poetry, Literature and Art.</i> Fine copy in a Doves binding by Cobden Sanderson. $12,000 to $18,000.
  • <i>Der Sturm.</i> 1922. Sold October 2021 for € 13,000.
    Diophantus Alexandrinus, <i>Arithmeticorum libri sex.</i> 1670. Sold October 2021 for € 18,000.
    <i>Cozzani Ettore e altri, l’Eroica. Tutto il pubblicato.</i> Sold October 2021 for € 11,000.
    Newton Isaac, <i>Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica.</i> 1714. Sold October 2021 for € 7,500.
    Manetti Saverio, <i>Storia naturale degli uccelli.</i> 1767-1776. Sold April 2021 for € 26,000.
  • <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Maps & Atlases<br>Natural History<br>& Color Plate Books<br>December 9, 2021</b>
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> John James Audubon, <i>Carolina Parrot, Plate 26,</i> hand-colored aquatint, 1828. $80,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Francisco Henrique Carls, <i>Album de Pernambuco e seus Arrabaldes,</i> 53 plates, Recife, circa 1873. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Capt. Thomas Davies, group of five engraved topographical scenes of North American waterfalls, London, 1768. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Maps & Atlases<br>Natural History<br>& Color Plate Books<br>December 9, 2021</b>
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> William R. Morley, <i>Morley’s Map of New Mexico,</i> New Mexico, 1873. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Paul Hariot, <i>Le Livre d’Or des Roses,</i> Paris, 1903. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> D. Miguel Geli, album of finely hand-drawn studies for nineteenth-century Spanish forts and military bunkers, circa 1830. $1,200 to $1,800.
  • <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
    <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
    <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
    <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
    <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>

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