• <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 17:</b> [EINSTEIN, ALBERT]; JOHN GRAUDENZ [PHOTOGRAPHER]. Photographic portrait of Albert Einstein by John Graudenz, taken circa 1928. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 17:</b> ENIGMA M4. A fully operational four-rotor ("M4") Kriegsmarine Enigma Cipher Machine. Berlin-Wilmersdorf, Germany, Heimsoeth und Rinke, 1942. $300,000 to $500,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 17:</b> FEYNMAN, RICHARD P. <i>“Surely You’re Joking Mr. Feynman”. Adventures of a Curious Character.</i> New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1985. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 17:</b> An intact egg of the Aepyornis Maximus, or Elephant Bird. Pre-17th century, Madagascar. $35,000 to $45,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 17:</b> Palm frond with fish. Green River Formation, Wyoming, United States. <i>Sabalites sp.,</i> and <i>Diplomystus dentatus</i> Cenozoic, Eocene (53-33 million years ago). $60,000 to $70,000.
  • <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> <i>The Birds of America; from Original Drawings by John James Audubon</i> $6,000,000 to $8,000,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> <i>The Birds of America; from Original Drawings by John James Audubon</i> $6,000,000 to $8,000,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> <i>The Birds of America; from Original Drawings by John James Audubon</i> $6,000,000 to $8,000,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> <i>The Birds of America; from Original Drawings by John James Audubon</i> $6,000,000 to $8,000,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> <i>The Birds of America; from Original Drawings by John James Audubon</i> $6,000,000 to $8,000,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Currier & Ives, <i>The Mississippi in Time of Peace,</i> hand-colored lithograph, 1865. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Hartmann Schedel, <i>Liber Cronicarum...,</i> Nuremberg, 1493. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Claudius Ptolemaeus, <i>Geographicae Enarrationis Libri Octo,</i> Lyons, 1535. $20,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Thomas Jefferys, <i>The American Atlas,</i> London, 1776-77. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> John Speed, <i>A Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World,</i> 20 miniature maps, London, 1665. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> <i>Biblia Das ist: Die Gantze Heilige Schrifft Durch D. Martin Luther Verteutscht,</i> illustrated cartographic Bible, Basel, 1665. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Early Hawaiian-language school geography, Lahainaluna Seminary, 1840. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Cornelis de Jode, <i>Africae Vera Forma, et Situs,</i> Antwerp, 1593. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Maria Vincenzo Coronelli, <i>America Settentrionale Colle Nuove Scoperte Sin All Anno,</i> Venice, 1688. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Johann Christoph Volkamer, <i>Nürnbergische Hesperides,</i> Nuremberg, 1708-1714. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Johann Bayer, <i>Uranometria, Omnium Asterismorum Continens Schemata...,</i> 51 celestial charts, c. 1603. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 17:</b> Manuscript map of Commodore Perry’s Black Ship squadron at Edo Bay, with manuscript sketchbook, ink & watercolor, Japan, c. 1853. $2,500 to $3,500.
  • <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> CLEMENS, SAMUEL L. <i>The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.</i> Hartford: The American Publishing Company, 1876. $14,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> BATEMAN, JAMES. <i>The Orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala.</i> London: J. Ridgway & Sons for the author, [1837]-1843. $60,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> WHITMAN, WALT. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn: [For the author by Andrew and James Rome,] 1855. $150,000 to $200,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> LEE, HARPER. Three “Seckatary Hawkins”-related books inscribed and signed by Harper Lee. $60,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Dec. 18:</b> POE, EDGAR ALLAN. <i>The Raven.</i> New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1845. $120,000 to $180,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - July - 2017 Issue

Eric Caren: Satisfied Seller at Christie's

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I am not known to mince words.  I give 100 percent and I expect 100 percent back.  On June 15th in New York, some of my best material came up for sale at Christie’s and my expectations were exceeded in every way. The realized prices were fabulous (all in, approximately $1.3 million for my one hundred lots) and the single owner special catalog they issued for my 100 plus lots was splendid.  I worked hand in hand with Christina Geiger (for the third time) and Peter Klarnet on the catalogue and they were supervised and assisted by Sven Becker who is the proverbial gentleman and scholar. The descriptions were concise yet informative and appealing. The previews were professional; and the videos, both in house and on Instagram, were handled beautifully by Christie's Social Media Dept. My decision to let Peter Klarnet narrate the videos was rewarded in spades and I later teased him that he should get an Oscar. His voice was sharp and his observations sharper still.  [I believe they can still be viewed on Instagram by doing a @christiesinc search for them.]

 

The auctioneer was as good as the one Dennis Holzman and I employed (Dale Stulz) when we started HCA back in the 1990's to replace Brian Riba Auctions. I was a friend to both Brian and his former partner Bill Mobley (one of the founders of The Ephemera Society).  I think that Dale had done auctions for either Christie's, Sotheby's or both.  Whichever, wherever he was good but not better than the auctioneer who called this sale.

 

For the event I was offered a skybox view but I had more buying to do while in New York City and afterwards in Massachusetts. For those who know me, this will not be a shock. In just the week following the sale, I added a Henry VIII tract condemning to death one of his wives and also containing the first English language law on Witchcraft, a run of London newspapers printed in 1693 and containing the Salem Witchcraft trials.  And there is more - a splendid and famous Einstein letter to a soldier about his reasons for being an atheist, an unrecorded variant American Bunker Hill broadside, an illustrated 1620's European Americana broadside and a letter group including one from Ft. Defiance and another from Libby Prison (with the guy's GAR kepi)! Obviously, my passion for this wonderful "Lifestyle" has not diminished since I started a half century ago (ouch that hurt to say) when I was 7.

 

One very special moment of the sale touched me deeply. I heard the auctioneer refer to someone in the room as "young man" and knew he would only do that if he was talking to a young man and he was...13! Apparently, this young man was there bidding with his young friend (rumors are that he/they won a lot or two). I was so moved, that I subsequently gifted 2 original 17th century items through Christie's to them with the hopes that they too will continue until they are old enough to do the same for their next generation.

 

I was equally moved by a preview brunch attended by fellow members of The Grolier Club, etc. Unfortunately, I was not present. But then I had a special visit from two of the great wordsmiths of our time; both friends of mine. Sir Harold Evans and Will Shortz met me at Christie's and I gave them a private tour of my sale. They have a lot in common. Sir Harry was a table tennis champ back in the 1940's and Will has one of the largest private table tennis clubs in the nation in Westchester, NY where I have had the "pleasure" of being trounced by Will. I really appreciated their support and we had some laughs together. Will got his original first ever Crossword puzzle printed (1913) decades ago from me.

 

I have never lost my childhood sense of wonder and I am grateful that Christie's made every moment of the experience memorable. I dedicated my catalog to Chris Coover, for over 35 years a Christie’s specialist, and I dedicate this article to Christie's and their fine staff. Christie’s auctioned my first "big sale" when I was 15: a 19th century Italian painting for which I paid $100, then returning my investment 10 times over.

 

There are lessons from this and indeed every sale. Many of them I have known for a long time. Many of you will know them too, but I hope that these lessons will be helpful to others.

 

Lesson #1- You never know at an auction which item(s) may take off (Star Spangled Banner lots, Jack the Ripper Handbill and Laus Deo Banner Headline on Cornwallis' Surrender)

 

Lesson #2- There are bargains to be had at every auction, even and perhaps, especially, at the highest level. The illustrated broadside on the Death of Holy Roman Emperor Maximillian 1519, the King Philip's Indian War manuscript, the Edison Lab drawing of the Light Bulb and the Zenger newspaper from prison, to my way of thinking, fall into this category.

 

Lesson #3- Buy what you love! When I started with rare newspapers they hardly ever made it into any auctions much less Christie's. Now many sell for 6 figures and many more 5 figures and I believe they still have a long way to go!

 

Lesson #4- All that is Gold does not Glitter! My material tends to be rather dull aesthetically but boy do they shine brightly when you read them and consider their historical significance!

 

Lesson #5- Stick with people who treat you well! Christie's treated me well 40 years ago and again last month.

 

Lesson #6- Historical paper is still unappreciated when compared to Contemporary Art, Coins, Watches, etc. So the savvy buyers should take notice...

 

...And I hope that they will also take notice on September 8th when Cowan’s holds my 7th "How History Unfolds on Paper" auction. Wes got into the auction business at the same time that Dennis Holzman and I did and for the same reasons. He is legendary now and recently said to me "Eric, Just imagine if you and I had teamed up!" I replied, "Wes you didn't need me at all!" From Historical Paper, he spread into many departments and has become famous on "Antiques Roadshow" and "History Detectives."

 

To sum this experience up I’ll simply say:  I’ve been fortunate and am grateful for this complex field.

 

Eric Caren

The Caren Archive

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>Macbeth: A Tragedy.</i> London, 1673. FIRST SEPARATE AND FIRST QUARTO EDITION. THE CHARLTON HESTON COPY. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. <i>In Our Time.</i> Paris, 1924. FIRST EDITION, PRESENTATION COPY. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL. <i>Fanshawe, A Tale.</i> Boston, 1828. FIRST EDITION OF AUTHOR'S FIRST BOOK. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> THOREAU, HENRY DAVID. <i>Walden; Or, Life in the Woods.</i> Boston, 1854. FINE COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies.</i> London, 1685. THE FOURTH FOLIO, Brewster/Bentley issue. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> STEIG, WILLIAM. Original maquette and 58 finished drawings for <i>The Agony in the Kindergarten,</i> one of Steig's most important books. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> VERNE, JULES. <i>A Journey to the Centre of the Earth.</i> New York & London, 1872. FIRST EDITION, RARE AMERICAN ISSUE, with Scribner & Welford cancel title. $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> KING, STEPHEN. <i>Carrie.</i> New York, 1974. INSCRIBED FIRST EDITION, OF AUTHOR'S FIRST BOOK. $1,200 to $1,800.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> APPLE MACINTOSH PROTOTYPE. 1983. The earliest known Macintosh with "Twiggy" drive, one of only two known working machines. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> PLATO. <i>Timaeus</i> [AND] <i>Critias</i> [from Ficini's 1484 Opera]. A LANDMARK OF SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> LOVELACE, AUGUSTA ADA. Sketch of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage Esq. London, 1843. FIRST EDITION, JOURNAL ISSUE, MOST IMPORTANT PAPER IN EARLY DIGITAL COMPUTING. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> APPLE-1 COMPUTER. Signed by Steve Wozniak, used in development of Apple II. $200,000 to $300,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. 1809-1882. <i>On the Origin of Species By Means of Natural Selection.</i> London, 1859. FIRST EDITION. $80,000 to $120,000.
  • <b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Seeking Consignments.</b> Churchill (Winston) & Others. 1944 Commonwealth Prime Ministers’ Conference, 27 April 1944. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Seeking Consignments.</b> Joyce (James). <i>Ulysses.</i> First English edition, 1922. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Seeking Consignments.</b> Belzoni (Giovanni Battista). <i>Plates Illustrated of the Researches and Operations...in Egypt and Nubia,</i> FIRST EDITION, 1821-1822. £14,375 inc Buyers Premium.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Seeking Consignments.</b> Astor (John Jacob). A collection of rare letters, 9 January 1812- 4 September 1837. £26,000 inc Buyers Premium.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Seeking Consignments.</b> Rowling (J.K.) <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone,</i> FIRST EDITION, first issue, 1997. £27,500 inc Buyers Premium.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Seeking Consignments.</b> Royal Family. Photograph of Queen Elizabeth, George VI, Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret, signed, 1946. £3,640 inc Buyers Premium.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Seeking Consignments.</b> Collodi (Carlo). <i>Le avventure di Pinocchio. Storia di un burattino,</i> FIRST EDITION, 1883. £8,401 inc Buyers Premium.

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