• <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> [Black Sun Press] Proust, Marcel, 47 Unpublished Letters from Marcel Proust to Walter Berry, Paris: The Black Sun Press, 1930. $400 to $600.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Williams, William Carlos (1883-1963), <i>Spring and All,</i> first edition, Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. $400 to $600.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Washington, George (1732-1799), Autograph Letter Signed. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Poe, Edgar Allan (1809-1849), Autograph Letter Signed. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Thoreau, Henry David (1817-1862), Autograph Manuscript. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> [Paris Commnue], Photograph album. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Fleming, Ian (1908-1964), <i>Casino Royale,</i> first edition, London: Jonathan Cape, 1953. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Audubon, John James and the Rev. John Bachman, <i>The Quadrupeds of North America,</i> New York: V.G. Audubon, 1849, 1851, 1854. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Lewis, C.S. (1898-1963), <i>The Voyage of the Dawn Treader,</i> first edition, London: Geoffrey Bles Ltd, 1952. $600 to $800.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> [Bhagavad Gita] Wilkins, Charles, trans., <i>The Bhagvat-Geeta, or Dialogues of Kreeshna and Arjoon…,</i> first edition, London: Printed for C. Nourse, 1785. $700 to $1,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, <i>Faust: Eine Tragodie von Goethe,</i> Hammersmith: Printed by T.J. Cobden-Sanderson & Emery Walker at the Doves Press, 1906-1910. $800 to $1,200.
  • <b><center>University Archives<br>Rare Manuscripts, Books & Sports Memorabilia<br>February 1, 2023</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Thomas Paine ALS Confirming Christmas Eve Attack Likely Based on Anti-Christianity, “The account you heard of a man firing into my house is true.” $24,000 to $35,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> George Washington Gives a Horse and Guns to His Loyal Guard 10 Days Before Resigning as Commander-in-Chief. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> John Hancock ALS, “General Howe is bent on coming here” - Troops, Martha Washington, & 1777 Continental Congress, to Wife Dolly! $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b><center>University Archives<br>Rare Manuscripts, Books & Sports Memorabilia<br>February 1, 2023</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Abraham Lincoln Boldly and Fully Signs Appointment of Consul Who Would Facilitate Bond Sales in Europe Financing Civil War. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> The Rarest of Dual Signed Kennedy Items! 1963 Christmas Card with "Blessed Christmas" Removed at the Last Minute for Kennedy's Jewish Friends. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> George Gershwin Signed Contract for 1st Production of <i>Porgy and Bess,</i> Also Signed by Dubose Heyward & Ira Gershwin, Historic! $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b><center>University Archives<br>Rare Manuscripts, Books & Sports Memorabilia<br>February 1, 2023</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Einstein Signed, “Two years after the fall of the German Goyim” 1st Ed. of <i>Mein Weltbild.</i> $12,000 to $14,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Walt Disney <i>Fantasia</i>-Era Boldly Signed TLS Re: "Special Effects Department," PSA Certified Authentic & With Phil Sears COA. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> 1996-97 Michael Jordan Chicago Bulls Home Game-Worn Jersey Showcasing "Light" Evident Use, MEARS A5. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b><center>University Archives<br>Rare Manuscripts, Books & Sports Memorabilia<br>February 1, 2023</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Wayne Gretzky’s 1994 All-Star Used Game Jersey, Inscribed to Former MLB Player! $4,500 to $5,500.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> <i>The Astronauts</i> Signed by All 7 Mercury Astronauts! $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Fabulous Edison, Firestone, Burroughs Signed Journal With 44 Original Photos, Very Rare. $4,000 to $5,000.
  • <b>Il Ponte, Jan. 31:</b> BLAEU, Joannes and Martinus MARTINI - <i>Theatrum orbis terrarum, sive Novus Atlas. Pars sexta. Novus Altas Sinensis.</i> Amsterdam: Blaeu, 1655. €8.000 to €12.000.
    <b>Il Ponte, Jan. 31:</b> ORTELIUS, Abraham - <i>Theatrum orbis terrarum.. Nomenclator ptolemaicus.</i> Antwerp: Christopher Plantin, 1579. €10.000 to €15.000.
    <b>Il Ponte, Jan. 31:</b> PIRANESI, Giovanni Battista - <i>Carceri d'invenzione.</i> [Rome: G.B. Piranesi, second half of the 18th century]. €20.000 to €30.000.
  • <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - June - 2017 Issue

“Codex Conquest” teaches Western Book History as a Board Game

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Students at the University of Iowa play test "Codex Conquest" during a 2016 class. It teaches the basics of Western book history from the 15th through 19th century as a multi-player game.

Codex Conquest is a board game using cards designed to teach European book history to audiences ranging from high school to graduate level players. It is being developed by Amy Chen, 32, special collections instruction librarian at the University of Iowa Libraries. “There's always a need for educational games because gaming helps students learn,” Chen said. “Games are just structured forms of play. You learn best when you're having fun.”

 

Her goal is “to bring special collections topics to wider audiences through Open Educational Resource (OER) card games.” OERs, she explained, “are free resources that can be used and revised by anybody. “

 

Codex Conquest can be played by audiences that would not be able to acquire the funds to pay for a game, are not close enough to a repository to come see rare materials, or need a less-intimidating introduction to key topics (“Although ideally,” she said, “it would be combined with a visit to see original items”).

 

Players assume the roles of important European countries: Spain, France, England, Italy and Germany. The object of the game is to acquire the best collections in books from the 15th through 19th centuries. The winner is the player who has created the collection with the highest point value through purchase, auction, trade and chance. In the process the players are exposed to some of the great books and events in the history of those countries.

 

Codex Conquest teaches students to recognize the canon of Western literature: its historical arc, what titles are most important, which genres were the most popular and at what times, and even how cultural and financial value are intertwined but not necessarily the same,” Chen said.

 

I really want students to learn that books and history are not independent subjects, she stressed. “Historical events don't just get summarized in books. Books contributed to how history happened. At the same time, the way history is documented in books shapes what we can remember.”

 

Chen began work on the project after a conversation with her supervisor, Greg Prickman, who told her he always wanted to develop a game about how books are made. “I loved the idea and started thinking up how to do it over the vacation. Only because my background is more in print culture than book production, I decided to focus Codex Conquest on the history of books.

 

Among the many steps in evolution of the game was “play testing,” in the form of a class she taught in 2016 for first-year honors undergraduates at Iowa (not future librarians). “In a sense, I had it easy," she said, "my students had not learned book history before, this was their first time in special collections, and most were non-humanities majors who would not be likely to find themselves in many English or History courses in the future. What I had to say to them was pretty new.

 

I did bring out original materials for students to see and browse.” she added. "We split the class in half, one half dedicated to the game and one half dedicated to the rare books. Sometimes what I brought out matched the books in the game, sometimes they were facsimiles. Occasionally I pointed to digital editions. Together, the range of materials helped us discuss what these items look like and the variety of ways we can engage with them. Personally, I think working with rare materials is important. I’m a scholar too, and you can’t have responsible scholarship without recourse to the original.

 

However, I keep in mind what a privilege it is to see rare books and manuscripts. Many classes come to Iowa from other institutions that don’t have the level of holdings that we do. I know that there are more classes that can’t make the drive. So while I honor the physical object, and at no point do I think my game replaces working with rare and unique materials, we have to recognize it isn’t always possible to provide a hands-on experience.”

 

Chen said that what her students liked about the experience “was the opportunity to tell me everything they didn’t like! I pitched my class to them as a game development course. I’d teach them book history, and they’d teach me how I needed to improve Codex Conquest to achieve that objective.”  

 

The thirteen members of her class wrote weekly blog posts where they critiqued all aspects of the game “….. from which countries I included to how well I balanced the credits.” To read the student and instructors blogs with individual feedback see the index from the course website:  codexconquest2016fall.wordpress.com/.

 

Other "play testing" came from Stephen Jacobs, a professor at Rochester Institute of Technology’s School of Interactive Games and Media, who conducted an evaluation in September 2016. His comments can also be found on the blog site. She also credited Serin Sulentic, an art instructor at IU and her students with the physical design of the game.

 

In April 2017 Chen traveled to New York to host game sessions at Columbia University and see Codex Conquest’s first adaptation, Codex Conquest: Jewish History, created by Michelle Chesner, the Norman E. Alexander Librarian for Jewish Studies.

 

Michelle and I drew a wide range of participants from across New York City and the surrounding areas. Those attending came from Columbia, Barnard College, New York University, Yeshiva University, Smith College, and the University of Pennsylvania. The feedback was positive—people were excited to think about how games can depict book history. Of course, everyone had lots of suggestions for improvements and expansion packs!”

 

Chen said that Chesner “transformed the game by changing out the history and book cards and adding a few additional chance cards to reflect Judaism’s print culture. I learned so much from her when I saw the game in action. She was teaching me as we played! I’m amazed by how in just a few months, she was not only able to revise the game entirely, but also begin reaching out to her community to think about how to use it in K-12 schools.”

 

As a librarian, I find it essential that we think flexibly about how to generate more affordable access to education, whether that means free textbooks or crowd-sourced curricula. I did not develop this game as a commodity that can be bought in a store because that would limit who could use it. By putting it on the web for free, I hope more students can benefit from my work. Plus, when others modify my game, they can expand its content in ways beyond what I am capable of, which I find rewarding to watch.

 

The best way to learn how to play is in person. I can explain the game in about five minutes and I’ve found people catch on quickly. All the play tests I ran helped me to figure out the best way to communicate the game’s structure and objectives, but I only really nailed how to do this easily in the past month when I took the game to Kyle Triplett’s class at Pratt and to Adam Hooks’ class at Iowa.

 

However, I revised the rules many times to make them as simple as possible. In fact, I took out many facets of the game that increased its complexity to achieve this objective.

 

Right now, I’m not set up to provide copies of the game for payment as it is meant to be a free open educational resource. I do have copies circulating, however, and if you contact me I can get a printed copy mailed to you after it has been played at another institution.”

 

Contact information:

Amy Chen

Special Collections

100 Main Library

125 West Washington Street

Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1420

Email: Amy-chen@uiowa.edu

Telephone (310) 335-5870



Useful links for Codex Conquest

Codex Conquest the Game of book history : codexconquest.lib.uiowa.edu/  ·        

Class: codexconquest2016fall.wordpress.com/  ·     

Original Game Hashtag: #codexconquest  ·        

Jewish History Game Hashtag: #codexconquestJE    



Open Educational Resources Wiki:  

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_educational_resources

.

Play Codex Conquest at RBMS Meeting June 20 at University of Iowa

June 20-23, 2017 Rare Books and Manuscript Section(RBMS) of the ALA meets this year at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.  ( conference.rbms.info/2017/ ) Those attending can play Codex Conquest  on Tues., June 20th, 6:00 pm-8:00 pm in the UI Library Special Collections Classroom. conference.rbms.info/2017/program/

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 817. Bellin's complete five-volume maritime atlas with 581 maps & plates (1764). $24,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 325. An early and important map of the Republic of Texas (1837). $11,000 to $14,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 45. De Bry's early map of North Pole depicting Willem Barentsz' expedition (1601). $3,500 to $4,250.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 154. Poignant map of the United States documenting lynchings (1931). $250 to $325.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 457. Extremely rare matching set of pro-German propaganda from WWI (1914). $2,000 to $2,400.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 815. Homann's world atlas featuring 110 maps in contemporary color (1751). $14,000 to $16,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 60. Miniature pocket globe based on Herman Moll (1785). $3,500 to $4,500.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 8. Visscher's rare carte-a-figures world map (1652). $14,000 to $16,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 158. Matching satirical maps of the US by McCandlish: "Ration Map" & "Bootlegger's Map" (1944). $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 820. One of the finest English atlases of the early 19th century (1808). $4,750 to $6,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 59. Important milestone in preparation for 1969 moon landing (1963). $750 to $900.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 805. Superb bible leaf with image of crucifixion of Jesus with gilt highlights (1518). $800 to $950.
  • <center><b>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts,<br>including Americana<br>February 16, 2023</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. CHAUCER, Geoffrey. <i>The Works…now newly imprinted.</i> Edited by F.S. Ellis. Hammersmith: Kelmscott Press, 1896. $100,000 to $125,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> [EINSTEIN, Albert (1879–1955)]. –– ORLIK, Emil (1870–1932), artist. Lithograph signed (“Albert Einstein”). N.p., 1928. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> TOLKIEN, John Ronald Reuel. <i>[The Lord of the Rings trilogy:] The Fellowship of the Ring.</i> 1954. –– <i>The Two Towers.</i> 1954. –– <i>The Return of the King.</i> 1955. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> CLEMENS, Samuel Langhorne ("Mark Twain") and Charles Dudley WARNER. <i>The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today.</i> Hartford and Chicago, 1873. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> LOVECRAFT, Howard Phillips. <i>Beyond the Wall of Sleep.</i> Collected by August Derleth and Donald Wandrei. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1943. $2,000 to $3,000.
  • <b><center>Swann Auction Galleries<br>View Our Record Breaking Results</b>
    <b>Swann:</b> Gideon Welles, <i>Extensive archive of personal and family papers of Lincoln’s Secretary of the Navy,</i> 1791-1914. Sold September 29 — $281,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> Charles Addams, <i>Rock Climbers,</i> cartoon for <i>The New Yorker,</i> watercolor, ink and gouache, 1954. Sold December 15 — $37,500.
    <b>Swann:</b> Charlotte Brontë, <i>Jane Eyre. An Autobiography. Edited by Currer Bell,</i> three volumes, first edition, 1847. Sold June 16, 2022 — $23,750.
    <b>Swann:</b> Geoffrey Chaucer, <i>The Workes of Geffray Chaucer Newlye Printed,</i> London, 1542. Sold October 13 — $106,250.
    <b><center>Swann Auction Galleries<br>View Our Record Breaking Results</b>
    <b>Swann:</b> Dorothea Lange, <i>Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California (Destitute pea pickers in California. Mother of seven children. Age 32),</i> silver print, 1936. Sold October 20 — $305,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> George Washington, Autograph Document Signed, with two manuscript plat maps in holograph, 1751. Sold October 27 — $37,500.
    <b>Swann:</b> Winfred Rembert, <i>Winfred Rembert and Class of 1959,</i> dye on carved & tooled leather, 1999. Sold October 6 — $233,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> M.C. Escher, <i>Relativity,</i> lithograph, 1953. Sold November 3 — $81,250.
  • <b><center>Sotheby’s<br>Original Film Posters<br>27 January - 10 February 2023</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Vertigo (1958), poster, US. The ultimate poster on this classic Hitchcock title, one of three known examples. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Lawrence of Arabia (1962), roadshow poster, US. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Star Wars (1977), style C poster, printer's proof, US. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> The Navigator/ La Croisiere du Navigator (1924), re-release poster (1931), French. £5,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Bullitt (1968), special test poster, US. £3,000 to £5,000.

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