• <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts Online<br>Now through June 21</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> THOREAU, HENRY DAVID. <i> Walden: or, Life in the Woods.</i> Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1854. $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> BUKOWSKI, CHARLES. Archive of Correspondence Addressed to Kay "Kaja" Johnson, Los Angeles, California: July – November 1961. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES, AND GEORGE CRUIKSHANK [ILLUSTRATOR]. Unpublished autograph letter signed, to Cruikshank, completed on the artist's proof, related to the publication of The Pic-Nic Papers. $7,000 to $10,000
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts Online<br>Now through June 21</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> FEYNMAN, RICHARD. <i>"Surely You’re Joking Mr. Feynman!" Adventures of a Curious Character.</i> As Told to Ralph Leighton. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1985. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> GERSHWIN, GEORGE. Autograph music manuscript of "Leavin’ for de Promise’ Lan’" from the opera Porgy and Bess, Act One Scene Two. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Document signed ("Abraham Lincoln") as sixteenth president, being a military commission for Rufus H. Johnson. $8,000 to $10,000
  • <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Book of Hours. Illuminated manuscript, Flanders or northern France, c. 1450. With 12 full-page illuminated miniatures. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Zahrawi, Abu’-Qasim, al- (c. 936-1013). <i>Albucasis chirurgicorum omnium,</i> Strasbourg, 1532. The first comprehensive illustrated treatise on surgery. £3,000 to £5,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Milles, Thomas. <i>The Custumers Alphabet and Primer,</i> 1608. Gilt supralibros of 17th-century English bibliophile Edward Gwynn. £2,000 to £3,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Guillemeau, Jacques. <i>Child-Birth or, the Happy Deliverie of Women,</i> 1st edition in English, 1612. The second midwifery manual printed in English. £1,500 to £2,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Rabisha, William. <i>The Whole Body of Cookery Dissected,</i> 1st edition, 1661. Rare. Five copies in libraries. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Royal binding. <i>An Abridgment of the English Military Discipline,</i> 1678. Contemporary red goatskin gilt by Samuel Mearne for Charles II (1630-1865). £1,500 to £2,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Pallavicino, Ferrante. <i>The Whores Rhetorick,</i> 1st edition in English, 1683. Rare anti-Jesuit satire. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Swift, Jonathan. <i>The Benefit of Farting,</i> 1st London edition, 1722. Teerink 19. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Edwards, George. <i>Natural History of Uncommon Birds</i> [and] <i>Gleanings of Natural History,</i> 7 volumes, 1743-64. Contemporary tree calf, 362 hand-coloured engraved plates. £8,000 to £12,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Campbell, Patrick. <i>Travels in the Interior Inhabited Parts of North America,</i> 1st edition, 1793. Howes C101; Sabin 10264. Uncut in original boards. £5,000 to £8,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Hearne, Samuel. <i>A Journey from Prince of Wales's Fort in Hudson's Bay, to the Northern Ocean,</i> 1st edition, 1795. Sabin 31181. Large-paper copy. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Edgeworth, Maria. <i>The Match Girl, A Novel,</i> 1808. £1,000 to £1,500
  • <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Darwin, Charles. <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> Presentation Copy. Sold for $500,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Darwin, Charles. Autograph Letter Signed, 3 pp, negotiating the 2nd American edition with Appleton. Sold for $21,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph Letter Signed, 8 pp, Paris, 1924, to his father discussing Bullfighting, Stories, and his new baby. Sold for $25,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Shakespeare, William. <i>Corialanus.</i> London, 1623. 1st printing [Extracted from the First Folio]. Sold for $50,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Swift, Jonathan. <i>Gulliver's Travels.</i> London, 1726. 1st edition, Teerink's A edition, fine, large copy. Sold for $21,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Fitzroy, Robert. Autograph Letter Signed to agent Thomas Stilwell, informing him of the progress of H.M.S. Beagle. Sold for $17,575.
    <center><b>Bonhams<br> Property from the Collection of Nicole and William R. Keck II</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Shakespeare, William. <i>Sonnets.</i> 1901. 2 volumes. Printed on vellum and illuminated by Ross Turner, bound by Trautz-Bauzonnet. Sold for $13,825.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Beardsley, Aubrey. <i>The Birth, Life, and Acts of King Arthur.</i> 1893-94. 2 volumes. Contemporary painted vellum gilt by Chivers. Sold for $5,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Assisi, St. Francis. <i>The Canticle of Brother Sun.</i> Illuminated on vellum, for the Grolier Society. Sold for $7,575.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Proust, Marcel. <i>Du coté de chez Swann.</i> 1st edition, 1st issue. Inscribed by Proust. Sold for $8,825.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Rackham, Arthur. <i>Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens.</i> 1/500 copies signed by Rackham. Sold for $4,825.
  • <b>Chiswick Auctions:</b> Rowling (J.K). <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone,</i> FIRST EDITION, first issue, 1997. £15,000 to £20,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Thornton (Samuel). <i>A Large Drought of the North Part of China Shewing…the Harbour of Chusan,</i> copper engraved map, 1711. £600 to £800
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Stuart (Helen). Portrait of a Maori, over-painted gelatin silver print, signed and dated, 1885. £4,000 to £6,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Picasso (Pablo). Minotaure vaincu, plate 89 from La Suite Vollard , signed, Paris, 1939. £4,000 to £5,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Pissarro (Camille). Vachère au Bord de l'Eau, NUMBER 14 OF 100 PROOFS, etching, 1890. £800 to £1,200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Einstein (Albert). Copy of typewritten script of the episode "The Atom" of the TV programme "Your World Tomorrow", signed by Einstein. £2,000 to £3,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2017 Issue

The “Old” LIFE: Art, Politics & Humor - What a Difference a Century Makes

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Teddy Roosevelt rides his ostrich.

Most dealers and collectors are well aware of the American magazine LIFE, founded by Henry Luce in 1936. Luce’s LIFE became a long running showcase for photo journalism. But few are familiar with the other LIFE, the “old” LIFE, the New York City humor magazine that had an equally interesting niche in the late 19th and early 20th century.

 

The “old” LIFE (1883-1936) specialized in gentle and not so gentle satire and featured a wide array of artists and illustrators, many of whom became household names. Those whose work appeared on its cover and pages included James Montgomery Flagg, Charles Dana Gibson, C(larence) Coles Phillips, Rea Irvin, Balfour Ker, Cory Kilvert, Orson Lowell, Power O’Malley, and many many more - all with a light touch and a steady hand. In later years Norman Rockwell was a regular contributor. His first cover was published in May 1917 and other Rockwell paintings were featured on LIFE’s cover 28 times between then and 1924.

 

Though the old LIFE had a long run it’s best years in my opinion were roughly late 1908 to early 1912, coinciding with the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt and overlapping into William Howard Taft. These were big men, big money, big deals and they were big times too. In a way it’s a period that almost directly imitates our own - with larger than life “Capitalism” front and center, income inequality, radical new ideas in the social order (like votes for women), waves of immigration and dramatic new technology including the airplane and the automobile, turning all established norms upside down.

 

LIFE is collectible both as complete issues of the magazine and/or as individual pieces (such as covers, centerfolds and ads) appearing in the periodical. Though the magazine started out as a black and white publication by 1908 every issue had a color cover, a double page centerfold spread in black and white which often focused on the perceived ironies of the day - be they the expanding empire of Guggenheim in Alaska, the excess of the privileged class, or the newfangled inventions spooking the livestock. Most issues had a full color ad on the back cover, often for the latest in automotive gear including electric cars. The inside pages contained many more cartoons as well as other ads especially for long vanished cars manufactured in fast growing industrial towns like Detroit, Indianapolis, Cleveland and Toledo.

 

In its editorial pages LIFE had cartoons on virtually every page. Some of LIFE’s biggest and best ones were in the center. These included clever line art by names like Harry Grant Dart, a whiz at predicting what fantastical form aviation might soon take. Another frequent contributor was Harrison Cady (the illustrator associated with Thornton Burgess) whose intricate drawings for LIFE were both complex and amusing. These two artists and other like them spared the feeling of no one: man, woman, bug or beast.

 

Targets for humor range from the unseemly habits of the recently rich (one centerfold cartoon showing a bevy of ugly damsels each with a purse and dollar signs over her head), another makes fun of presidential excess showing the jungle’s version of TR - a scene filled with animals running from the great White Hunter. There was an unlimited supply of derision for suffrage. From social commentary to sentimental valentines the centerfolds includes them all: pretty Gibson girls, young love, college days, fat people being readied for the cannibal’s pot, rich people looking ridiculous as they crash their airplanes and cars, poor people struggling to get by as the great ball labeled “greed” mows them down.

 

Among themes that interest today’s collector that show up quite a bit in these early issues of LIFE are the rights of women, anti-vivisection, how people of color are portrayed and attitudes towards Jews and immigrants.

 

When it came to votes for women the official view at LIFE was “No way.” To make sure the reader was perfectly clear on their point of view the magazine went as far as to sponsor a contest on “Why I would Not Marry a Suffragette” and offered a prize of $300 (a very respectable sum for the day) for the best contributions. They not only solicited entries but published the submissions as a regular feature. In the pages of LIFE women who favored the vote are depicted as stout, grumpy, unappealing, misguided and undesirable. As a genre these anti-women's rights cartoons were well drawn, funny (if you weren’t a woman) and uniformly took the position that votes for women was one one of the silliest ideas ever to come down the pike.

 

Though they never took it seriously, they gave it a lot of space both in pictures and words, and even devoted special issues and any number special sections devoted to predictions of what would become of emasculated “husbands” should women ever move up a notch in the food chain.

 

Other topics LIFE did well were explicit and moving, the anti-vivisection drawings showing evil scientists just about to slice up the family dog. They were early with drawings that put forward the then new idea of conservation of public land and preserving open space. Though few of LIFE cartoons were overtly “racist,” race does play a role in many of the images they published. There are lots of cartoons, illustrations and ads featuring people of color, mainly as maids, porters, chauffeurs and other service occupations.

 

Both immigration and antisemitism make frequent appearances. The tilt against immigrants is palpable, especially against Italians who are depicted as dark and thieving and prone to leave the Black Hand in their wake. Jews are drawn marching in formation all with enormous noses, and also frequently depicted as a nasty bunch whose long reach stretched out to control the New York theaters.

 

The hot technology a hundred years ago was not the iPhone or the Android tablet, it was the automobile and the airplane. LIFE was one of the first magazines to really cater to the fantasies of the newly rich for speed, mobility and elegance. Early on the magazine gave the new inventions superior color printing, top placement, great typography, impressive copy, vivid art and photos that extol a life of fast cars, ease, luxury and the willingness to drop a bundle on the latest and the greatest automotive technology.

 

LIFE also ran the line counts on the various models so it was possible not only to see what was being advertised but also how frequently. Among the large automotive ads are both color and black and white for Pierce Arrow, Locomobile, REO, Willys, Olds, Studebaker, Packard cars and trucks, Marmon, Baker Electric and indeed electric vehicles of all kinds, not to mention tires, accessories including horns and speedometers.

 

What pages LIFE did not fill with snappy patter, cartoons, jibes at women, and car ads they saved to extol the virtues of guns (You should have one, a small one if you’re a lady), breakfast cereal, soap (Ponds, Mennen, Ivory), nice clothes from Brooks Brothers and rather awkward looking garters for your socks, not to mention Coca Cola, Wrigley’s gum and stiffer brew in the form of beer and spirits.

 

Reading "old" LIFE in the age of Trump is to realize we’ve already been down this road at least once before and lived to tell about. It’s all there from the 1% to micro-aggressions played out in an earlier incarnation that’s now more than a century old.

 

If you keep an eye out for the “old” LIFE watch for names that will appear again in a larger or different context. Two that come to mind are Walt Kuhn, an American cartoonist and artist who drew for LIFE in its early years and went on in 1913 to be one of the principal organizers of the Armory Show. He was a painter of some note by the time the 20s rolled around. Another fine artist, Edward Borein, best known for his scenes of life in the American West, appeared from time to time as the illustrator for Pierce Arrow car ads.

 

I don’t really see a lot of issues of LIFE being offered as complete magazines or as bound volumes. What I do see is individual pages or work by individual artists. Particularly popular are the fade-away girls of C. Coles Phillips and the iconic women of Charles Dana Gibson as well as and other images by the popular artists of the day like James Montgomery Flagg.

 

When it comes to recent selling prices they seem to range from about $20 for a nice centerfold to over $200 for the prized issue with Teddy Roosevelt riding an ostrich on the cover. When offered as individual issues most of these magazines are still in the $25-$50 range.

 

The “old” LIFE ended in 1936, when Luce bought the name for his new, but unrelated periodical. Don’t confuse them, there’s nothing that ties them together except the name. In the meantime the “old” LIFE is still a great place to find illustrated ephemera and political and social commentary of the period.

 

Links: Here’s a site that carries a good inventory of “old” LIFE all years and displays the individual issues in a visual format.

 

https://2neat.com/magazine/product-category/life-magazine-1883-1936/

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini. June 27</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KENNEDY ONASSIS, JACQUELINE Typed letter signed to Oleg Cassini. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> [CASSINI-KENNEDY FASHIONS] Important archives related to the development of fashions for Mrs. Kennedy… $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> [CASSINI-KENNEDY FASHIONS] Detailed ledger of the Kennedy White House years… $500 to $800
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KELLY, GRACE. Four autograph letters to Oleg Cassini. $5,000 to $8,000
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini. June 27</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> CASSINI, OLEG. Group of Kennedy-era original fashion sketches. $1,000 to $1,500
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KENNEDY ONASSIS, JACQUELINE. Autograph letter signed to Oleg Cassini. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> CASSINI, OLEG. Fashion sketch titled “Mrs. Kennedy-Palais de Versailles-State Dinner.” $800 to $1,200
    Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini: [CASSINI, OLEG - KENNEDY, JACQUELINE.] Group of approximately 130 original fashion designs… $800 to $1,200.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> NYC pride parade photos by Hank O’Neal, annotated on verso by Allen Ginsberg, 1970s. Pictured is Marsha P. Johnson. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> David Wojnarowicz, <i>Neon Dancer,</i> postcard signed to Jim Fouratt, 1982. $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Personal papers of Candy Darling, New York, circa 1950s-1973. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Walt Whitman, <i>Memoranda of the War,</i> Remembrance Copy, inscribed to Peter Doyle, from “the author with his love,” Camden, 1875-76. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Oscar Wilde, <i>The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,</i> first edition, signed, London, 1899. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> James Baldwin, <i>Giovanni’s Room,</i> first edition, presentation copy, New York, 1956. $1,800 to $2,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> JEB (Joan E. Biren), <i>Ginger and Catherine,</i> silver print, 1972. $700 to $1,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Su Negrin, <i>Gay Liberation,</i> photograph by Peter Hujar, poster published by Times Change Press, 1970. $400 to $600.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Harvey Milk, Autograph Letter Signed, as acting Mayor of San Francisco, March 7, 1978. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 23:</b> Lester Beall, <i>Rural Electrification Administration,</i> 1939. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Gerda Wegener, <i>Two Women in a Window,</i> watercolor, chalk & wash, circa 1920. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Jean Cocteau, original sketchbook, <i>Le Mystère et Antigone,</i> including sketches of his lover Jean Desbordes, 1932. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Djuna Barnes, <i>Ladies Almanack . . . Written & Illustrated by A Lady of Fashion,</i> limited edition, signed & inscribed to her literary executor, 1928. $10,000 to $15,000.
  • <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Blaise Cendrars and Fernand Léger, <i>La Fin du monde filmée par l’ange N.-D.,</i> Paris, Editions de la Sirène, 1919
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> André Breton, <i>Second manifeste du Surréalisme,</i> Paris, Editions Kra, 1930
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Paul Eluard and Pablo Picasso, <i>La Barre d’appui,</i> Paris, Editions « Cahiers d’Art », 1936
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Blaise Cendrars and Fernand Léger, <i>La Fin du monde filmée par l’ange N.-D.,</i> Paris, Editions de la Sirène, 1919
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Hans Bellmer, <i>Die Puppe,</i> Paris, G.L.M., 1936
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Salvador Dali, <i>La femme visible,</i> Paris, Editions Surréalistes, 1930

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