• <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Fall 2019 Auction<br>September 28, 2019</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> AUDUBON, John James. Snowy Owl, Plate 121. Aquatint Engraving with original hand color. London: Havell Jr., 1827-1838 from <i>Birds of America.</i> $225,000 to $300,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> JEFFERYS, Thomas. <i>The American Atlas...</i> London: Sayer and Bennett, 1776. $65,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> RACKHAM, Arthur. Original Illustrations for <i>Jack and the Beanstalk.</i> Pen and ink with watercolor on paper. C. 1913. $60,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> AUDUBON, John James. Ruffed Grous, Plate 41. Aquatint Engraving with original hand color. London: Havell Jr., 1827-1838 from <i>Birds of America.</i> $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> ROESSLER, A. R. Latest Map of the State of Texas. Lithograph with original hand color. New York: Mittendorfer, 1874. $50,000 to $65,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Fall 2019 Auction<br>September 28, 2019</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> AUDUBON, John James. American Bison or Buffalo (Male), Plate 56. Lithograph with original hand color. New York, 1845-1848 from <i>Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America.</i> $18,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> HOOKER, Sir William Jackson & FITCH, Walter Hood. Victoria Regia. Lithograph with original hand color. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1851. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> AUDUBON, John James. Pin Tailed Duck, Plate 227. Aquatint Engraving with original hand color. London: Havell Jr., 1827-1838 from <i>Birds of America.</i> $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> LEWIS, Meriwether and CLARK, William. <i>Travels to the Source of the Missouri River and Across the American Continent...</i> London, 1814. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Sep. 28:</b> AUDUBON, John James. American Black or Silver Fox, Plate 116. Lithograph with original hand color. New York, 1845-1848 from <i>Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America.</i> $18,000 to $25,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Eric Carle, <i>The Very Hungry Caterpillar,</i> hand-painted collage. Sold for a record $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Charles Addams, <i>Couple passing a giant bird house,</i> watercolor cartoon for <i>The New Yorker,</i> 1948. Sold for $16,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Miriam Troop, <i>Rain on Laundry Day,</i> oil on canvas, cover for <i>The Saturday Evening Post,</i> 1940. Sold for $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Rockwell Kent, <i>To All Fascists,</i> ink broadside for The League of American Writers, circa 1937. Sold for $6,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Jo Mielziner, <i>Pet Shop Drop,</i> backdrop design for <i>Pal Joey</i> on Broadway, 1940. Sold for a record $55,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Lee Brown Coye, acrylic cover illustration for the 25th anniversary of <i>Weird Tales,</i> 1944. Sold for $18,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Virgil Finlay, <i>The Outsider & Others,</i> pen & ink dust jacket illustration for H.P. Lovecraft's book, 1939. Sold for $5,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Al Hirschfeld, <i>Paul Robeson as Othello,</i> illustration for <i>The New York Times,</i> 1942. Sold for $68,750
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Illustration Art:</b> Frederic Remington, pen & ink illustration for <i>A Scout with the Buffalo Soldiers</i> in <i>The Century</i> magazine, 1889. Sold for $17,500.
  • <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>September 25, 2019</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Rowling (J.K.) <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone,</i> FIRST EDITION, first issue, 8vo, 1997. £15,000 to £20,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Bible, Italian.- Malermi Bible, woodcut illustrations, folio, Lazaro de Soardi & Bernardino Benali, Venice,1517. £8,000 to £12,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Germany.- Homann (Johann Baptist). <i>Atlas von Deutschland,</i> engraved half title, hand coloured, 87 double page engraved maps, [folio, Erben, Nuremberg, 1753]. £8,000 to £10,000
    <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>September 25, 2019</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> [Mirk (John)].- <i>Liber festivalis et Quatuor sermons</i> [bound with], [Le Roy (Pierre)] <i>A Pleasant Satyre or Poesie,</i> first edition in English, Widdow Orwin for Thomas Man, 1595, 8vo. £1,500 to £2,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Antoninus Florentinus (Saint Archbishop of Florence). <i>Confessionale: Defecerunt…,</i> 8vo, Pietro Quarengi, Venice, 15 February 1499. £1,000 to £1,500
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Jesuit Letters.- [Froes (Father Luigi) & et al.)] Avvisi del Giapone de gli anni 1582, 1583, 1584…, 1586 [bound with] Avvisi della Cina et Giapone…, FIRST EDITIONS, Rome. £1,000 to £1,500
    <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>September 25, 2019</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Plutarch & Probus (Aemilius). <i>Plutarchi Cheronei et Aemilii Probi Illustrium,</i> folio, Nicolas de Pratis for Jean-Petit, Paris, 1521. £1,000 to £1,500
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Bible.- English. <i>The Byble in Englyshe of the Largest and Greatest volume,</i> elaborate woodcut border, text vignettes, folio, 1541. £1,000 to £1,500
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Fore-edge Painting.- Lord George Byron, The Giaour, a Fragment of a Turkish Tale, bound with 10 other titles, 4 plates marked 'Proof.', 1813. £800 to £1,200
    <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>September 25, 2019</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Manson (John). Twelve by Sixteen Papers of John Mason, a collection of 50 sheets of paper, some watermarked, 12 x 16”, c.1978. £800 to £1,200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Fleming (Ian). <i>Dr. No,</i> FIRST EDITION, original boards, dust-jacket, 8vo, 1958. £700 to £900
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Eliot (T.S.) <i>Four Quartets,</i> NUMBER 121 of 290 COPIES, signed by author, 1960. £400 to £600

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2017 Issue

The “Old” LIFE: Art, Politics & Humor - What a Difference a Century Makes

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Teddy Roosevelt rides his ostrich.

Most dealers and collectors are well aware of the American magazine LIFE, founded by Henry Luce in 1936. Luce’s LIFE became a long running showcase for photo journalism. But few are familiar with the other LIFE, the “old” LIFE, the New York City humor magazine that had an equally interesting niche in the late 19th and early 20th century.

 

The “old” LIFE (1883-1936) specialized in gentle and not so gentle satire and featured a wide array of artists and illustrators, many of whom became household names. Those whose work appeared on its cover and pages included James Montgomery Flagg, Charles Dana Gibson, C(larence) Coles Phillips, Rea Irvin, Balfour Ker, Cory Kilvert, Orson Lowell, Power O’Malley, and many many more - all with a light touch and a steady hand. In later years Norman Rockwell was a regular contributor. His first cover was published in May 1917 and other Rockwell paintings were featured on LIFE’s cover 28 times between then and 1924.

 

Though the old LIFE had a long run it’s best years in my opinion were roughly late 1908 to early 1912, coinciding with the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt and overlapping into William Howard Taft. These were big men, big money, big deals and they were big times too. In a way it’s a period that almost directly imitates our own - with larger than life “Capitalism” front and center, income inequality, radical new ideas in the social order (like votes for women), waves of immigration and dramatic new technology including the airplane and the automobile, turning all established norms upside down.

 

LIFE is collectible both as complete issues of the magazine and/or as individual pieces (such as covers, centerfolds and ads) appearing in the periodical. Though the magazine started out as a black and white publication by 1908 every issue had a color cover, a double page centerfold spread in black and white which often focused on the perceived ironies of the day - be they the expanding empire of Guggenheim in Alaska, the excess of the privileged class, or the newfangled inventions spooking the livestock. Most issues had a full color ad on the back cover, often for the latest in automotive gear including electric cars. The inside pages contained many more cartoons as well as other ads especially for long vanished cars manufactured in fast growing industrial towns like Detroit, Indianapolis, Cleveland and Toledo.

 

In its editorial pages LIFE had cartoons on virtually every page. Some of LIFE’s biggest and best ones were in the center. These included clever line art by names like Harry Grant Dart, a whiz at predicting what fantastical form aviation might soon take. Another frequent contributor was Harrison Cady (the illustrator associated with Thornton Burgess) whose intricate drawings for LIFE were both complex and amusing. These two artists and other like them spared the feeling of no one: man, woman, bug or beast.

 

Targets for humor range from the unseemly habits of the recently rich (one centerfold cartoon showing a bevy of ugly damsels each with a purse and dollar signs over her head), another makes fun of presidential excess showing the jungle’s version of TR - a scene filled with animals running from the great White Hunter. There was an unlimited supply of derision for suffrage. From social commentary to sentimental valentines the centerfolds includes them all: pretty Gibson girls, young love, college days, fat people being readied for the cannibal’s pot, rich people looking ridiculous as they crash their airplanes and cars, poor people struggling to get by as the great ball labeled “greed” mows them down.

 

Among themes that interest today’s collector that show up quite a bit in these early issues of LIFE are the rights of women, anti-vivisection, how people of color are portrayed and attitudes towards Jews and immigrants.

 

When it came to votes for women the official view at LIFE was “No way.” To make sure the reader was perfectly clear on their point of view the magazine went as far as to sponsor a contest on “Why I would Not Marry a Suffragette” and offered a prize of $300 (a very respectable sum for the day) for the best contributions. They not only solicited entries but published the submissions as a regular feature. In the pages of LIFE women who favored the vote are depicted as stout, grumpy, unappealing, misguided and undesirable. As a genre these anti-women's rights cartoons were well drawn, funny (if you weren’t a woman) and uniformly took the position that votes for women was one one of the silliest ideas ever to come down the pike.

 

Though they never took it seriously, they gave it a lot of space both in pictures and words, and even devoted special issues and any number special sections devoted to predictions of what would become of emasculated “husbands” should women ever move up a notch in the food chain.

 

Other topics LIFE did well were explicit and moving, the anti-vivisection drawings showing evil scientists just about to slice up the family dog. They were early with drawings that put forward the then new idea of conservation of public land and preserving open space. Though few of LIFE cartoons were overtly “racist,” race does play a role in many of the images they published. There are lots of cartoons, illustrations and ads featuring people of color, mainly as maids, porters, chauffeurs and other service occupations.

 

Both immigration and antisemitism make frequent appearances. The tilt against immigrants is palpable, especially against Italians who are depicted as dark and thieving and prone to leave the Black Hand in their wake. Jews are drawn marching in formation all with enormous noses, and also frequently depicted as a nasty bunch whose long reach stretched out to control the New York theaters.

 

The hot technology a hundred years ago was not the iPhone or the Android tablet, it was the automobile and the airplane. LIFE was one of the first magazines to really cater to the fantasies of the newly rich for speed, mobility and elegance. Early on the magazine gave the new inventions superior color printing, top placement, great typography, impressive copy, vivid art and photos that extol a life of fast cars, ease, luxury and the willingness to drop a bundle on the latest and the greatest automotive technology.

 

LIFE also ran the line counts on the various models so it was possible not only to see what was being advertised but also how frequently. Among the large automotive ads are both color and black and white for Pierce Arrow, Locomobile, REO, Willys, Olds, Studebaker, Packard cars and trucks, Marmon, Baker Electric and indeed electric vehicles of all kinds, not to mention tires, accessories including horns and speedometers.

 

What pages LIFE did not fill with snappy patter, cartoons, jibes at women, and car ads they saved to extol the virtues of guns (You should have one, a small one if you’re a lady), breakfast cereal, soap (Ponds, Mennen, Ivory), nice clothes from Brooks Brothers and rather awkward looking garters for your socks, not to mention Coca Cola, Wrigley’s gum and stiffer brew in the form of beer and spirits.

 

Reading "old" LIFE in the age of Trump is to realize we’ve already been down this road at least once before and lived to tell about. It’s all there from the 1% to micro-aggressions played out in an earlier incarnation that’s now more than a century old.

 

If you keep an eye out for the “old” LIFE watch for names that will appear again in a larger or different context. Two that come to mind are Walt Kuhn, an American cartoonist and artist who drew for LIFE in its early years and went on in 1913 to be one of the principal organizers of the Armory Show. He was a painter of some note by the time the 20s rolled around. Another fine artist, Edward Borein, best known for his scenes of life in the American West, appeared from time to time as the illustrator for Pierce Arrow car ads.

 

I don’t really see a lot of issues of LIFE being offered as complete magazines or as bound volumes. What I do see is individual pages or work by individual artists. Particularly popular are the fade-away girls of C. Coles Phillips and the iconic women of Charles Dana Gibson as well as and other images by the popular artists of the day like James Montgomery Flagg.

 

When it comes to recent selling prices they seem to range from about $20 for a nice centerfold to over $200 for the prized issue with Teddy Roosevelt riding an ostrich on the cover. When offered as individual issues most of these magazines are still in the $25-$50 range.

 

The “old” LIFE ended in 1936, when Luce bought the name for his new, but unrelated periodical. Don’t confuse them, there’s nothing that ties them together except the name. In the meantime the “old” LIFE is still a great place to find illustrated ephemera and political and social commentary of the period.

 

Links: Here’s a site that carries a good inventory of “old” LIFE all years and displays the individual issues in a visual format.

 

https://2neat.com/magazine/product-category/life-magazine-1883-1936/

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. September 26, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Dubliners,</i> first edition, signed presentation inscription from the author, 1914. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> The Beatles.- Baker (Geoffrey.) 3 Autograph Letters and 1 Autograph Card signed to Ann Gosnell, addtionally sgn’d by George Harrison, John Lennon, Cynthia Lennon and others, 1968. £5,000 to £7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Pilgrim Press.- Dod (John). <i>A plaine and familiar exposition of the tenne commandements ...,</i> [Leiden], [William Brewster], 1617. £15,000 to £20,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. September 26, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Automaton Chess Player & Mechanical Illusion.- Reynell (H., printer). “The Famous Chess-Player, No.14, St.James's-Street, next Brooks's,” broadside advertisement for "The famous Automaton", [1784]. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Clemens (Samuel Langhorne). <i>Life on the Mississippi,</i> first English edition, signed presentation inscription from the author, 1883. £8,000 to £12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Arctic Sledge Flag.- Fulford (Reginald Baldwin). Sledge flag... HMS Discovery, 1875. £4,000 to £6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. September 26, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Rowling (J.K.) <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone,</i> first edition, first printing, 1997. £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Piranesi (Giovanni Battista). <i>Le Antichità Romane,</i> 4 vol., 1756. £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Canaletto (Giovanni Antonio Canal, called). <i>Urbis Venetiarum Prospectus Celebriores,</i> 3 parts in 1, Richard Ford's copy, Venice, Giovanni Battista Pasquali, 1751. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. September 26, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Atlases.- Speed (John). <i>A Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World,</i> bound with <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine,</i> 1631-27. £12,000 to £18,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 26:</b> Anatomical illustration.- Aselli (Gaspare). <i>De lactibus sive lacteis venis... dissertatio,</i> first edition, Milan, Giovanni Battista Bidelli, 1627. £20,000 to £30,000
  • <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> EARLY AVIATION PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHIVE. Chronicling 20th century aviation from the earliest Wright Brothers images through commercial and military applications. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> SPUTNIK-1 EMC/EMI LAB MODEL, 1957. Full scale vintage test model of the Sputnik-1 satellite, Moscow, [February, 1957]. $400,000 to $600,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> FIRST TELEPHONE CALL TO THE MOON. Partial transcription signed by Apollo 11 astronauts and President Nixon. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> Apollo 11 Beta cloth crew emblem, SIGNED BY THE ENTIRE APOLLO 11 CREW. $8,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 17:</b> GEMINI 1/8 SCALE MODEL. Rarely seen large-scale contractor's model. $3,000 to $5,000
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> SMITH, CHRISTOPHER WEBB. 1793-1871. <i>Indian Ornithology.</i> [Patna, India]: 1828. $50,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DUPRÉ, LOUIS. 1789-1837. <i>Voyage à Athènes et à Constantinople, ou Collection de portraits, vues et costumes grecs et ottomans.</i> Paris: Dondey-Dupré, 1825. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> ADAMS, JOHN. Autograph Letter Signed ("J Adams"), [to Dr. Perkins?] while recovering from his small pox inoculation, [late-April, 1764]. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> AUSTEN, JANE. Autograph Letter Signed ("J. Austen"), to her sister Cassandra, 4 pp, "Thursday – after dinner," [September 16, 1813,] Henrietta St. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> AUDUBON, JOHN JAMES. 1785-1851. <i>The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> New York & Philadelphia: J.J. Audubon & J.B. Chevalier, 1840-1844. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DODWELL, EDWARD. 1767-1832. <i>Views in Greece.</i> London: Rodwell and Martin, 1821. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> JAMES, JESSE. Autograph Letter Signed ("Jesse W. James"), to Mr. Flood demanding Flood retract spurious accusations, 3 pp, June 5, 1875. $200,000 to $300,000.

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