• <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Oscar Wilde, <i>“The secret of life is in Art,”</i> autograph quotation dated and signed, 1882. Sold for $15,600.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>Manhattan Gay Scene Guide 1969, Summer Edition,</i> Mattachine Book Service. Sold for $3,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Toyen, pen & ink illustration from <i>Marquis de Sade: Justina cili prokletí ctnosti,</i> 1932. Sold for $26,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Antonio Lopez, 9 men’s fashion studies, graphite, 1974. Sold for $6,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Harvey Milk, 2 autograph letters signed, to Pat Mormon, during US Navy service, 1954. Sold for $2,210.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Daniel Abraham, original art for <i>Stonewall Romances,</i> pen, ink & gouache, 1979. Sold for $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> David Wojnarowicz, <i>Untitled (Genet with Dog),</i> mixed media collage. Sold for $27,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Susie Gaynes & Amy E. Bartell, <i>March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights,</i> 1987. Sold for $1,188.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>Paris is Burning,</i> photo offset poster by Anne Dutlinger, signed by film director Jennie Livingston, 1991. Sold for $1,500.
  • <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> <i>All-Negro Comics</i> Issue #1, 1947. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Early Memoir of a Black Hairdresser, 1859. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> First Edition <i>Letters of the Late Ignatius Sancho, An African,</i> 1782. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Bessie Coleman Aero News Vol. 1 Issue 1, May 1930, Signed by William J. Powell. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Book of Poetry and Music by Formerly Illiterate Author Thomas Young, 1897. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Cabinet Card of 24th Infantryman, Tombstone, Arizona Territory, circa 1882. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> James Baldwin Portrait by Carl Van Vechten, 1955. $3,500 to $4,500.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> <i>The Pacific Appeal</i> Newspaper, San Francisco, 1877. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Only Known Copy <i>Spreading Joy,</i> Uplift History of African Americans in Los Angeles, 1937. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> 1940 Los Angeles <i>The Official Central Avenue District Directory.</i> $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> GRÉGOIRE, Henri (French, 1750-1831). <i>An Enquiry Concerning the Intellectual and Moral Faculties, and Literature of Negroes,</i> First American Edition, 1810. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> 1893 Indian Territory Album with Images of Tacky Grayson. $4,000 to $6,000.
  • <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 1st<br>Antique and modern prints,<br>drawings and paintings</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 2nd<br>Photographs, autographs, musical works and manuscripts</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Books from XV to XX Century</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Mathematics books</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Art books from Salvador Dalí<br>& others</b>
  • <center><b>Firsts Online Rare Book Fair<br> 27 November to 2 December<br><br> Presented by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association</b>

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - January - 2017 Issue

A Library Plans to Sell a Valuable Century-Old Book Collection

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The Jesuit Library in Ireland (from the library's Facebook page).

Important old books tend to become harder and harder for collectors to find, as the best are either purchased by or given to institutions. Once there, it is expected they will never return to public circulation, making it difficult if not impossible for private collectors ever to own a copy. However, in recent years, a few institutional libraries, either from financial need or inability to properly care for collections, have reversed the trend, putting books long out of public circulation back into the market. A major such example was recently announced in Ireland. A large collection of books held in the Jesuit Library near Dublin for over a century, including many items of incunabula (books published prior to 1501), will go up for sale next summer.

 

Slated to be sold is what is known as the "O'Brien Collection" at the Jesuit Library. It was bequeathed to the Jesuits on the death of Irish Justice William O'Brien in 1899. O'Brien was an Irish judge, book collector, and devoted Catholic. According to his obituary in the Law Times of 1900, his opportunities as a young man were limited by his faith, but he nonetheless stood by it. Over the years, he supported various Catholic organizations, so it is no surprise that he gave his valuable collection to the Jesuits when he died. According to the Irish Times, which reported the news of the planned sale, "thousands of books" from the collection have already been shipped to Sotheby's in London for the sale. That sounds like a surprisingly large number. Some items have been held back, specifically ones the National Library of Ireland requested be placed with them on a long-term loan. The value of those being put up for sale is estimated at £1,500,000 (or about $1.9 million).

 

According to the Irish Times, Sotheby's described the collection as "one of the most important of its kind to come to the market." It is said to contain rare printed books from the 15th century, early Shakespeare editions, literature, and medieval manuscripts. What exactly is in there has not been published. A catalogue of incunabula at the Milltown Park Library (Jesuits) published in 1932 listed 117 items of incunabula bequeathed to it by William O'Brien in 1899. Presumably, many of these items are among those to be offered.

 

This does not appear to be a sale motivated by a severe need for money. The Jesuits have good uses for the funds, including upkeep of churches, caring for invalid priests, religious education, and relief of the poor. However, the Jesuits have a painting on "indefinite loan" to the National Gallery said to be worth $50 million. That is not the behavior of an institution that badly needs funds. Two other factors were cited. A spokesperson for the Jesuits was quoted as saying the books and manuscripts "are of such an age that they require specialist care and conservation." A sale would “allow for these precious books to be properly cared for and appreciated." That is indeed an issue for institutions with valuable old books that do not specialize in book preservation. Selling the books may be kinder than keeping them.

 

The other factor was the lack of use of the collection. A Sotheby's spokesman was quoted as saying the library "has barely ever been consulted by students or scholars in the past 100 years." Add to that the fact that Dublin has other libraries with similar material and it made sense to the Jesuits to let this go. It's not like the library will be lacking in books for scholarly study. They still have over 140,000 volumes.

 

As to whether any controversy will arise, as always seems to be the case in these situations, we don't know. The Jesuits seem to have put everything in place to make this a fait accompli before anything was announced. The decision was made, the National Library was given a chance to say what should not be sold, an export license was obtained from the government to ship the books overseas, and they were sent to London. A sale date has been set for June 7, 2017. This is a decision that will be hard to undo.

 

Now, here is a cap on a story that ended differently. In 2015, Gordon College, in Wenham, Massachusetts, announced that it would be selling part of a collection it had received in 1921. In that year, the heirs of Edward Payson Vining gave his book collection to the college. It contained 7,000 books. Vining was an officer of the Union Pacific Railroad, who retired relatively young and occupied himself with research, writing, and book collecting. He had a few odd theories, such as that Hamlet was a woman, and America was first discovered by Afghan monks, but a little eccentricity never hurt anyone. Gordon really didn't much know what to do with his collection, so for years, many of the books remained packed in boxes. Nonetheless, when the college announced it would sell some of them, it raised some strong opposition among faculty and others.

 

The college had moved well along in the process at the time. They had selected 10% of the books from the collection to sell, and hired Doyle New York to conduct the auction. A date had been set. The purpose, officers of the college explained, was to raise funds so they could adequately preserve the remainder of the collection. Though only 10% of the collection was to be sold, it too was valued at around $2 million.

 

Ultimately, the objectors prevailed, or at least, they convinced the administration to change its mind. Last summer, the college announced that it was withdrawing the sale and would seek other sources of funding to maintain the books. That has evidently been accomplished, and last month, Gordon announced the first exhibition highlighting some of the long mothballed Vining books. An exhibition of some of the Vining books is being held at the Barrington Center for the Arts on the Gordon campus. It is entitled Vining’s Shakespeare: Highlights from the Edward Payson Vining Collection. The exhibit is free to the public and runs through January 16. Among the highlights of Vining's collection are Shakespeare's second and fourth folio. Other books on display include a 1611 King James Bible and a 1755 Samuel Johnson dictionary. And, there will also be a few items written by Vining himself, including one where he exposed Hamlet as a woman and a lecture he gave to New York's Shakespeare Society. There is even a clip from a 1920 German film in which Hamlet is portrayed by a woman.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>Latin and French Book of Hours, around 1490. Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br> P. Goos, <i>Le Grand Miroir de la Mer,</i> 1669. Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>L. Feininger, Letter with woodcuts, 1920. Est: € 25,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>Latin Bible manuscript, 12th century. Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>M. E. Bloch, <i>Naturgeschichte der Fische,</i> 1782-95. Est: € 40,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>M. Chagall, <i>Daphnis & Chloé,</i> 1961. Est: € 90,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>L. J. Waghenaer, <i>Speculum nauticum,</i> 1586. Est: € 180,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>P. J. de Pannemaeker, Collection of orig. watercolors, 1878-1887.<br>Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>G. Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> 1918.<br>Est: € 15,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br><i>Livro dos prestimonios,</i> Manuscript, 1665. Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>W. Kandinsky, <i>Klänge,</i> 1913.<br>Est: € 18,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>J. Miró in J. Cassou, <i>Vingt-deux poémes,</i> 1978. Est: € 8,000
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Music, Continental Books<br>and Medieval Manuscripts<br>24 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2020<br>Online</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>F. Schubert. Autograph letter to his brother Ferdinand, 4 pages, Zseliz, 1818. £80,000 to £120,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>L. v. Beethoven. Fine autograph letter to his librettist Friedrich Treitschke, about their planned opera, 1815. £70,000 to £90,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Hermann Hesse, Highly important series of 62 letters and postcards to Stefan Zweig, 1903-1938. £60,000 to £80,000.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Music, Continental Books<br>and Medieval Manuscripts<br>24 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2020<br>Online</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Book of Hours, Use of Reims, illuminated manuscript on vellum [France, late 15th century]. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Armenian gospel book, illuminated manuscript on vellum, seventeenth century, tooled calf binding. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>C. Goldoni. Ten autograph letters signed to the Genoese nobleman Cristoforo Spinola, Venice 1742-1743. £7,000 to £9,000.

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