• <b><center>Hindman:<br>Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts,<br>Including Americana<br>November 9-10, 2021
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> HOOKE, Robert (1635-1702). <i>Micrographia: Or Some Psychological Descriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses.</i> London: for James Allestry, 1667. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> [THE FEDERALIST PAPERS]. -- [HAMILTON, Alexander, James MADISON and John JAY. <i>The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, Written in Favour of the New Constitution…</i> $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> FUCHS, Leonhart (1501-1566). <i>Histoire des Plantes de M. Leonhart Fuschsius, avec les noms Grecs, Latins & Fraçoys.</i> Paris: Arnold Byrkman, 1549. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b><center>Hindman:<br>Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts,<br>Including Americana<br>November 9-10, 2021
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> AUDEBERT, Jean Baptiste (1759-1800). <i>Histoire naturelle des singes et des makis.</i> Paris: Desray, An XIII [1799-1800]. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> [UNITED STATES CONTINENTAL CONGRESS]. <i>Journals of the Congress...</i>Volume I (Sept. 5, 1774-Jan. 1, 1776) through Volume XIII (November 1787-November 1788). $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> [UNITED STATES CONTINENTAL CONGRESS]. <i>The Journals of the Proceedings of Congress. Held at Philadelphia, from January to May, 1776.</i> $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b><center>Hindman:<br>Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts,<br>Including Americana<br>November 9-10, 2021
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> [TEXAS]. <i>Map of Bexar County, Texas.</i> San Antonio and Austin: Samuel Maverick & John H. Traynham, 1889. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> GARDNER, Alexander (1821-1882). Imperial albumen Photograph. <i>Scenes in the Indian Country</i> [Fort Laramie]. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> WILLIAMS, H. Noel. <i>Madame Recamier and her Friends.</i> London and New York: Harper & Brothers, 1906. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b><center>Hindman:<br>Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts,<br>Including Americana<br>November 9-10, 2021
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> [MOSER, Barry, illustrator]. <i>The Holy Bible. Containing All the Books of the Old and New Testaments.</i> North Hatfield, MA and New York City: Pennyroyal Caxton Press, 1999. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> [PRINTS]. MOSER, Barry. Alice in Her Sister’s Reverie. [1982]. 433 x 552 mm. Signed and captioned by Moser in pencil, designated artist’s proof (“ap”). $1,000 to $1,500.
    16 <b>Hindman, Nov. 9-10:</b> [MOSER, Barry, illustrator]. A group of 4 wood-engraved plates for the Pennyroyal Press edition <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.</i> [West Hatfield, MA: Pennyroyal Press, 1985]. $600 to $800.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 28:</b> Pancho Villa, passport for a news correspondent covering the Mexican revolution, signed, 1914. $1,000 to $2,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 28:</b> Nirvana’s <i>Nevermind,</i> CD insert signed & inscribed days after release by Cobain, inscribed by Novoselic, 1991. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 28:</b> Robert Indiana, <i>The Book of Love,</i> complete portfolio, artist’s proof set, 1997. $100,000 to $125,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 28:</b> Marcel Vertés, Colette, <i>Chéri,</i> two volumes, deluxe edition, signed by the artist, Paris, 1929. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 28:</b> Virginia Woolf, <i>Orlando,</i> first trade edition, first impression, London, 1928. $1,200 to $1,800.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 28:</b> Mark Twain, receipt for payment of the Mark Twain Public Library Tax, 1908. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 28:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk von Gustav Klimt,</i> portfolio, collotype plates, 1918. $15,000 to $20,000.
  • <center><b>The 19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop<br></b>Catalogue 190:<br>Magnificent Books & Photographs<br><b>Free on request</b>
    <b>19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop:</b> William Shakespeare. <i>The Second Folio</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop:</b> Abraham Lincoln. Autograph note on Black troops in the Union Army (1865).
    <b>19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop:</b> Neil Armstrong. The largest known U.S. flag flown to the Moon on Apollo 11 (1969).
    <b>19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop:</b> William Henry Fox Talbot. <i>The Pencil of Nature</i> (1844-1846) the first photo illustrated book.
    <b>19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop:</b> Albert Einstein. Letter on relativity and the speed of light (1951).
  • <center><b>Gonnelli Auction House<br>Books and Graphics<br>26th-29th of October 2021</b>
    <b>Gonnelli Auction 31, Oct. 28th- 29th:</b><br>Books from XV to XX Century
    <b>Gonnelli Auction 31, Oct. 28th:</b><br>Manuscripts and autographs
    <b>Gonnelli Auction 31, Oct. 28th:</b><br>Artist books
    <b>Gonnelli Auction 31, Oct. 28th:</b><br>Cars & more
    <b>Gonnelli Auction 31, Oct. 28th:</b><br>Magazines
    <b>Gonnelli Auction 31, Oct. 28th- 29th:</b><br>Books from XV to XX Century

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2016 Issue

Another Library Plans to Sell Books to Raise Funds, But This Time With a Twist

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The Newcastle Central Library.

Another case of a library seeking to pare its collections for financial reasons comes from Newcastle Upon Tyne, in England's northeast. This is a story we have heard before, though this time it has an unusual twist on how the library hopes to balance its budget.

 

Newcastle's City Library is certainly a source of pride for the community. A new, modern structure, begun in 2007, it was completed in 2009. Of course, we all know what happened to the world economy between those two dates. Governments have been struggling with budgets ever since. Meanwhile, usage of libraries has been rapidly shifting. Electronic resources have greatly replaced physical ones, printed books more and more taking a backseat. Libraries often have reams of old printed books that are rarely ever used. They require space and maintenance, not inexpensive, in a time when funds are being reduced. It's a conundrum libraries everywhere face.

 

The fifth floor of the library contains what is known as the "cultural stack." It holds many of the books the library has been accumulating from as far back as 150 years ago. The City Council wants to cut it back. The decision is not based on some sort of desire by the council to cut collections and services. Rather, it is dealing with substantially reduced funds coming from the British government to fund its services. Many cuts, including of employee salaries, are under consideration to deal with the shortfall. Newcastle has a Labor government, a party, naturally enough, focused on the rights of labor, but still, salaries and bills must be paid, and funds to pay those bills are drying up.

 

What makes this case somewhat different from most is how the library hopes to benefit from reducing its collections. The books it seeks to dispose are not likely to be notably valuable. There are no million dollar books to help balance the budget. Nor is there a particular need for the space for other library services. Ideally, they could just leave the books there indefinitely. However, the city council needs more funds to operate the library, and space in this beautiful new building in a good location is a valuable asset. They want to clear out the fifth floor so they can rent the space. The council has estimated the space can bring in £110,000 (US $135,000) in annual rents. Every pound helps, and 110,000 of them helps even more.

 

What is in these stacks and what criteria will be used in deciding what stays and goes? First, here are the criteria. The City Council policy is books should not be kept simply because they are rare. They should, for the most part, be of local significance. They can be about the area, written by a local author, or some other such connection. However, books part of a collection of national significance will also be kept. Also, they should be of some general interest, and be in good condition or planned for repair.

 

Next, we need to look at what is in the stacks. This has not yet been done in any detail. A few examples were cited. A copy of The Basic Writings of Sigmund Freud from the Modern Library was shown. We found 243 copies offered on AbeBooks right now. Two hundred are priced under $22.50, five under $2, the lowest $1. We are not sure of the editions, or even if there were more than one, but 1938 first editions are among the dollar and change copies. This is not a valuable book.

 

There is also said to be much classical literature and editions of Shakespeare. Some editions may be valuable, but I suspect that much is of little value. Even if purchased 150 years ago the library was not filling their shelves with First Folios. Other things may be intriguing, such as British patent abstracts from 1617, but as an orphan set in Newcastle, it's unlikely to have much practical use. There is probably a better place for this.

 

The plan is to bring in "experts" to evaluate what is in the collection. Books and periodicals appropriate to the library in keeping with its criteria would be moved up to the sixth floor with their more valuable collections. Items not appropriate but of value would be sold. Others will be given away to other libraries or historical associations if wanted, or otherwise disposed of. Evidently, the library recognizes that there are books here that really are of no financial value.

 

This plan is not without controversy, as are all plans by libraries to dispose of some of their old books. Local playwright Lee Hall was quoted by the Newcastle Chronicle as calling this a "philistine response" to government cuts. He added the biting remark that the library would become a "vast atrium for a few computer terminals." While also describing it as a "panic" in response to "unjust cuts from the central government," that still doesn't resolve the dilemma with which the City Council has no choice but to deal. The cuts may be unjust but they are real, and some services will have to bear the brunt, even if they don't deserve it.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> STEVE JOBS REVEALS HIS SPIRITUAL SIDE. Autograph Letter to Tim Brown, 1974. $200,000 to $300,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> DIDEROT, DENIS. 1713-1784; & JEAN LE ROND D'ALEMBERT. 1717-1783, EDITORS. <i>Encyclopedie, ou dictionnaire raisonne des sciences, des arts et des metiers.</i> $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist. Evanston, Illinois: Library of Living Philosophers, 1949. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> APPLE MACINTOSH PROTOTYPE, 1982. Earliest known to appear at auction. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> TRINITY PROJECT: STAFFORD L. WARREN. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> JIMMY HARE PHOTOGRAPH OF WRIGHT FLYER SIGNED BY BOTH WRIGHT BROTHERS, 1908. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> HAGELIN CX-52 CIPHER MACHINE, Type D, Switzerland, Crypto AG, 1950s, no 33454. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> FEYNMAN WORKING ON QUARK THEORY. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> STEVE JOBS SETS THE STAGE FOR DESKTOP PUBLISHING. Signed document, 1982. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> MEMORYMOOG PLUS, THE CLASSIC ANALOG POLYSYNTH OF THE 1980S. $7,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Nov. 3:</b> WRIGHT BROTHERS: DAYTON 1909, <i>The Nation State and City Welcome the World's Greatest Aviators.</i> $12,000 to $18,000.
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>The Ricky Jay Collection<br>October 27 & 28, 2021</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Oct. 27-28:</b> "Remarkable Persons". A remarkable collection of remarkable characters. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Oct. 27-28:</b> Scot, Reginald. A serious debunking witchcraft and demonology. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Oct. 27-28:</b> (Buchinger, Matthias). Buchinger's own family tree. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Oct. 27-28:</b> Bibrowski, Stephan. Most likely reading A Midsummer Night's Dream. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Oct. 27-28:</b> Kellar, Harry (Heinrich Keller). Kellar loses his head. $4,000 to $6,000.

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