Rare Book Monthly

Articles - August - 2016 Issue

An Update: Dealers Adjusting

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Midway through 2016 the world is decidedly different than it was as recently as a year ago.  Domestic violence in the United States, Europe and Africa, slowing growth in many parts of the world, Brexit, the rise of isolationism, and the presidential election in the United States are spelling hard times for the world of collectibles.  I asked six dealers the following question, “Looking back five and ahead five years, where have you come from, where are you now, and where will you be?

 

I spoke with John Doyle of Crawford Doyle in New York, Bill Reese of the William Reese Company, Jim Cummins of New York, David Lilburne of Antipodean Books, Bob Haines of Argonaut Book Shop in San Francisco and Fran Durako of Kelmscott Bookshop for their perspectives.  All were generous with their time and elaborate in their answers.

 

David Lilburne has an open shop as do Argonaut Bookshop, Kelmscott Bookshop, and Crawford Doyle Booksellers.  They all have seen declining store traffic.  All six sell online, often selling on many sites including their own.  They have all issued catalogues at some time and four, Bill Reese, Bob Haines, Jim Cummins and Fran continue to do so regularly.  They all issue e-lists and Bill Reese also publishes four-color bulletins to showcase visually appealing material.

 

They all have done, and most plan to continue to do, shows.  The disappearance of rare book retailers is an old story and today book fairs, over the occasional weekend, approximate the feeling of the open shops that once were the principal incubator for new collectors. 

 

Most spoke of the past in positive terms and the present in acceptable terms.  “It takes more work to sell books for what is generally less money.”  This is how David Lilburne describes it.  John Doyle, who has a used and collectible retail presence in upper Manhattan, describes the business today as “okay but only because this is my second career and the first paid well.”  Jim Cummins, who lives in the rarified air of exceptional collectibles, calls the world we are in today  “different, more difficult but ultimately fine.  My son has joined the business and I’m optimistic.” 

 

I mentioned to Fran that David has cut prices on what used to be a robust category for him, books priced from $10 to $100.  Today they are all $10.  She added, “Abe and other online sites have negatively affected this category so I may have to do that myself at some point.”

 

Several mentioned that libraries are increasingly the recipients of what dealers used to sell but no longer sell efficiently.  “Library fairs have become a phenomena.  They price aggressively and attract bargain hunters.”    For libraries it’s an appealing business, for booksellers not so much.

 

Dealers selling at the top seem happy to be there.  “We [Bill Reese speaking on behalf of his organization] have, for ten years, been aggressively cutting prices on slow moving material while sharpening our focus on unique copies of exceptional books.  The top of the market remains firm.  Our challenge is to keep the less expensive, less rare inventory competitive so we review and re-price as necessary.”  Browsers remember what they have seen and describe dealer stock as fresh or passed over.  “Fresh” is important.

 

Bill also mentions, and this applies generally to dealers we spoke with, that making direct solicitation remains important.  We try to understand our collector’s objectives and quote them appropriate material.  We also visit collectors and institutions and bring material for their consideration.

 

It is also true that everyone sells material that aren’t gems but fit well in collectable sectors.  Bob Haines singles this out as an important strategy.  “We issue e-lists of appealing Gold Rush and California history items and do well with them.  Having the right material, appropriate descriptions, and attractive pricing is important.”  For many collectors e-lists are an acquired taste.  They are becoming important but their best days are in the future.

 

All these dealers are continuously experimenting and evolving.   They have to.  The rules of the game are quickly evolving.

 

In a significant reversal, where once it was the bookseller who introduced the fledgling collector to the field today it is increasingly at auction where meaningful material is first purchased.  For dealers, figuring how to work themselves into the auction house – collector conversation is a high priority.  Dealers have experience, inevitably decades in the trade, and bring an educated perspective.  Convincing collectors to pay them a fee for their opinion – often to say “no” is an acquired taste.  For myself, for most purchases over a few thousand dollars I rely on expert opinion.  Finding appropriate material is the goal, avoiding inappropriate purchases equally important.

 

The interaction between object and buyer will continue to evolve.  Formulas that once worked are now regularly tweaked and augmented.  Printed catalogues that for a few years seemed in decline this year seem to be staging a recovery.   The shows will continue to attract audiences.  And listing sites will find ways to improve cost efficiency.  These dealers are adjusting and seem to be in a good place today.

 

When I asked a leading auction figure about the typical age of bidders a few years back I found them to be both younger, about ten years less that book collectors who buy from dealers, and also more plentiful.   So it turns out the next generation is in the game and they are buying.  The challenge for dealers then is to connect with this younger audience and, given the wide range of experimentation underway, I think they will. 


Posted On: 2016-08-22 16:30
User Name: Fattrad1

Bruce,

You had such negative comments concerning dealers just two years ago at the Book Club of California. As I wrote to you then, the best dealers will adapt quickly, I am one of them.

The Evil One


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Blaise Cendrars and Fernand Léger, <i>La Fin du monde filmée par l’ange N.-D.,</i> Paris, Editions de la Sirène, 1919
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> André Breton, <i>Second manifeste du Surréalisme,</i> Paris, Editions Kra, 1930
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Paul Eluard and Pablo Picasso, <i>La Barre d’appui,</i> Paris, Editions « Cahiers d’Art », 1936
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Blaise Cendrars and Fernand Léger, <i>La Fin du monde filmée par l’ange N.-D.,</i> Paris, Editions de la Sirène, 1919
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Hans Bellmer, <i>Die Puppe,</i> Paris, G.L.M., 1936
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Salvador Dali, <i>La femme visible,</i> Paris, Editions Surréalistes, 1930
  • <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini. June 27</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KENNEDY ONASSIS, JACQUELINE Typed letter signed to Oleg Cassini. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> [CASSINI-KENNEDY FASHIONS] Important archives related to the development of fashions for Mrs. Kennedy… $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> [CASSINI-KENNEDY FASHIONS] Detailed ledger of the Kennedy White House years… $500 to $800
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KELLY, GRACE. Four autograph letters to Oleg Cassini. $5,000 to $8,000
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini. June 27</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> CASSINI, OLEG. Group of Kennedy-era original fashion sketches. $1,000 to $1,500
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KENNEDY ONASSIS, JACQUELINE. Autograph letter signed to Oleg Cassini. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> CASSINI, OLEG. Fashion sketch titled “Mrs. Kennedy-Palais de Versailles-State Dinner.” $800 to $1,200
    Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini: [CASSINI, OLEG - KENNEDY, JACQUELINE.] Group of approximately 130 original fashion designs… $800 to $1,200.
  • <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Darwin, Charles. <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> Presentation Copy. Sold for $500,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Darwin, Charles. Autograph Letter Signed, 3 pp, negotiating the 2nd American edition with Appleton. Sold for $21,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph Letter Signed, 8 pp, Paris, 1924, to his father discussing Bullfighting, Stories, and his new baby. Sold for $25,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Shakespeare, William. <i>Corialanus.</i> London, 1623. 1st printing [Extracted from the First Folio]. Sold for $50,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Swift, Jonathan. <i>Gulliver's Travels.</i> London, 1726. 1st edition, Teerink's A edition, fine, large copy. Sold for $21,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Fitzroy, Robert. Autograph Letter Signed to agent Thomas Stilwell, informing him of the progress of H.M.S. Beagle. Sold for $17,575.
    <center><b>Bonhams<br> Property from the Collection of Nicole and William R. Keck II</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Shakespeare, William. <i>Sonnets.</i> 1901. 2 volumes. Printed on vellum and illuminated by Ross Turner, bound by Trautz-Bauzonnet. Sold for $13,825.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Beardsley, Aubrey. <i>The Birth, Life, and Acts of King Arthur.</i> 1893-94. 2 volumes. Contemporary painted vellum gilt by Chivers. Sold for $5,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Assisi, St. Francis. <i>The Canticle of Brother Sun.</i> Illuminated on vellum, for the Grolier Society. Sold for $7,575.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Rackham, Arthur. <i>Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens.</i> 1/500 copies signed by Rackham. Sold for $4,825.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Proust, Marcel. <i>Du coté de chez Swann.</i> 1st edition, 1st issue. Inscribed by Proust. Sold for $8,825.
  • <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Book of Hours. Illuminated manuscript, Flanders or northern France, c. 1450. With 12 full-page illuminated miniatures. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Zahrawi, Abu’-Qasim, al- (c. 936-1013). <i>Albucasis chirurgicorum omnium,</i> Strasbourg, 1532. The first comprehensive illustrated treatise on surgery. £3,000 to £5,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Milles, Thomas. <i>The Custumers Alphabet and Primer,</i> 1608. Gilt supralibros of 17th-century English bibliophile Edward Gwynn. £2,000 to £3,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Guillemeau, Jacques. <i>Child-Birth or, the Happy Deliverie of Women,</i> 1st edition in English, 1612. The second midwifery manual printed in English. £1,500 to £2,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Rabisha, William. <i>The Whole Body of Cookery Dissected,</i> 1st edition, 1661. Rare. Five copies in libraries. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Royal binding. <i>An Abridgment of the English Military Discipline,</i> 1678. Contemporary red goatskin gilt by Samuel Mearne for Charles II (1630-1865). £1,500 to £2,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Pallavicino, Ferrante. <i>The Whores Rhetorick,</i> 1st edition in English, 1683. Rare anti-Jesuit satire. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Swift, Jonathan. <i>The Benefit of Farting,</i> 1st London edition, 1722. Teerink 19. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Edwards, George. <i>Natural History of Uncommon Birds</i> [and] <i>Gleanings of Natural History,</i> 7 volumes, 1743-64. Contemporary tree calf, 362 hand-coloured engraved plates. £8,000 to £12,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Campbell, Patrick. <i>Travels in the Interior Inhabited Parts of North America,</i> 1st edition, 1793. Howes C101; Sabin 10264. Uncut in original boards. £5,000 to £8,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Hearne, Samuel. <i>A Journey from Prince of Wales's Fort in Hudson's Bay, to the Northern Ocean,</i> 1st edition, 1795. Sabin 31181. Large-paper copy. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Edgeworth, Maria. <i>The Match Girl, A Novel,</i> 1808. £1,000 to £1,500
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ian Fleming, <i>Goldfinger,</i> first edition, inscribed to Sir Henry Cotton, MBE, London, 1959. Sold for $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Joseph Brant, Mohawk Chief, ALS, writing after pledging support to King George III against American rebels, 1776. Sold for a record $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Sonia Delaunay, <i>Ses Peintures</i> . . ., 20 pochoir plates, Paris, 1925. Sold for a record $13,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Diana, Princess of Wales, 6 autograph letters signed to British <i>Vogue</i> editor, 1989-92. Sold for $10,400.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Alexander Hamilton, ALS, as Secretary of the Treasury covering costs of the new U.S. Mint, 1793. Sold for $12,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Benjamin Graham & David L. Dodd, <i>Security Analysis,</i> first edition, inscribed by Graham to a Wall Street trader, NY, 1934. Sold for $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> George Barbier & François-Louis Schmied, <i>Personnages de Comédie,</i> Paris, 1922. Sold for $9,375.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Ilsée, Princesse de Tripoli,</i> Paris, 1897. Sold for a record $13,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ralph Waldo Emerson, <i>The Dial,</i> first edition of the reconstituted issue, Emerson’s copy with inscriptions, Cincinnati, 1860. Sold for a record $3,250.

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