Rare Book Monthly

Articles - July - 2016 Issue

Book Theft Is An International Problem

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Book theft is not a problem limited to the U.S. or even the West. RAPSI, the Russian Legal Information Agency, reports that three "members of an organized gang" have been sentenced to terms of 3.5 to 5.5 years in prison for thefts from Moscow libraries. It could have been worse for them, as many as 15 years, but that is still a serious amount of time to have to spend in a Russian jail. Last summer, they were charged with stealing "antique books of historical, scientific, artistic and cultural value." One had already been placed in detention and the other two under something resembling house arrest a year earlier. Officials had searched their premises and reported at least ten instances of theft over eight years. One book was estimated to be worth as much as $30,000 on the international market.

 

RAPSI said investigators had determined that sales were made at "auctions, through resale shops, secondhand bookshop and art centers, as well as to collectors." No mention was made as to whether any of these books found their way into international trade.

 

In England, an assistant head teacher at a church school in Newark, Nottinghamshire, pleaded guilty to stealing £5,000 worth of books from her school. She was not a collector, but a seller. The case baffled those at the school and in the courtroom. She earned a salary of £58,000 (US $82,000). Why would she risk it all for such a relatively small amount more? She blamed stress for her actions, and her attorney described it as a "cry for help." Of course, if she wanted help from the police, she could have just gone down to the station and asked for it, rather than stealing books from her school and selling them for a profit. The judge was having none of it, saying that she had abused her trust, while the head teacher said that colleagues felt betrayed, noting that teaching suffers when books are stolen during a time of tight budgets.

 

The theft was tracked down after a colleague purchased a replacement for a missing book and realized it was the one that was missing from the library. The assistant head teacher was given a two-year suspended jail sentence. Undoubtedly, her teaching career is also suspended.

 

Speaking of selling a book back to the theft victim, a 35-year-old Joplin, Missouri man made that terrible mistake. This one definitely goes down in the less than brilliant criminal category. Evidently, he and two associates stole a book at Books-A-Million on a Sunday afternoon. On Sunday evening, he attempted to sell it back again. He wasn't caught immediately, but two days later he was. That day he was shoplifting again, this time at Cavender's. Police were called in and quickly found all three. One of the suspects was found at Subway, presumably eating rather than shoplifting, while the other two were at Toys R Us, with, we imagine, bad intentions.

 

Another way too obvious book thief, Andrew Shannon of Dublin, Ireland, is heading to prison. Not exactly heading to prison since he is already there, but he will be staying a little longer thanks to a theft of 57 books from an Irish castle. Shannon was convicted in February of stealing the books from Carton House in Kildare, once the estate of the FitzGerald family. Their crests were on many of the books. The current owners undertook a major renovation project, during which time its books were placed in boxes. When the boxes were reopened, the books were not all there. Instead, they turned up in Shannon's home decorating his shelves. He thought they looked nice.

 

Shannon claimed he bought them at something akin to a flea market, but the jury was unconvinced. Perhaps his history worked against him. He had earlier been convicted of theft while wandering outside an English castle with several artifacts stuffed under his clothing. He claimed to be looking for a bathroom, but didn't adequately explain why he needed to have estate property under his coat in order to find a bathroom. The fact that he had the locations of six English estates, all of which were missing items, programmed into his GPS was not helpful either. Indeed, Shannon had something between 35 and 48 prior convictions under his belt, depending on which news source you believe. After awhile you lose count. He is either very unlucky or an incorrigible thief.

 

Despite all of his thievery, Shannon is best known for a crime in which he stole nothing. He is the man who walked into the National Gallery of Ireland in 2012 and after gazing at a $10 million Monet painting for a moment, punched a hole in it. He claimed he suffered some sort of seizure related to his heart condition that caused him to raise his fist and smash the painting with such force that it set off alarms on the other side of the room. He fell to the ground, but quickly recovered. Even his own doctor had trouble explaining how a heart seizure could have caused this, though he tried. The jury didn't buy that one either. Shannon was convicted and sentenced to 6 years in prison, with the final 15 months suspended. That is why he is already in prison. This latest conviction will add a year to that, through the final 6 months are suspended.

 

In the most serious case relating to collectible books, a federal grand jury in Atlanta indicted Daniel Barrs on charges pertaining to the Bank Secrecy Act. Barrs was a bit too secretive. Those involved in the money transfer business, as was his company, Global Transaction Services, are required to inform federal authorities of questionable transactions. The purpose is to catch money laundering. However, the charges make it clear that the government believes that people were using GTS to transfer money instead of using regular banks because they expected GTS would not file the reports with the government the banks would. The law requires various actions to protect against laundering, including the filing of Suspicious Activity Reports (SAR) with the U. S. Treasury when certain suspicious transfers are made.

 

The indictment stated that GTS performed hundreds of millions of dollars worth of transfers without ever filing an SAR. Numerous suspicious transfers were cited. It also noted that Barrs had hired people with no experience with the Bank Secrecy Act to monitor compliance, including his teenage grandson. Perhaps the grandson was very precocious, but then again, maybe not.

 

As to how this involves old books, one of the examples of dubious transactions the U. S. Attorney cited involved antiquarian books. The Attorney stated that an individual in Japan wired money dozens of times to Iraq so as to convert funds into Iraqi dinars. However, the Japanese currency reseller listed the purpose of the wires as "to buy antique books." Now why buying antiquarian books should be regarded as a suspicious activity is not clear, and perhaps unfair. Then again, why a collector in Japan would need to convert his currency to Iraqi dinars to be able to buy "hundreds of thousands of dollars" of old books is also kind of vague. If he actually needed Iraqi dinars so he could buy old books in Iraq, which is surely not what he was doing, then it would undoubtedly have been to buy books looted by ISIS from Iraqi libraries anyway. There is really no good explanation for this, or at least, that is what the U. S. Attorney concluded.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest Hemingway's Typewriter Used to Write "A Moveable Feast", Impeccable Provenance From His Biographer A. E. Hotchner. $50,000 to $100,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Samuel Colt, "The Gun that Won the West": 3 Signed Patent Items for "Revolving Cylinder Guns". $40,000 to $50,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Jack Kerouac's Own Typewriter From His Estate Used to Write His Very Last Book. $18,000 to $20,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Rare Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence Printed in 1848. $15,000 to $18,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Superb Tchaikovsky ALS to Napravnik, 4pp on "Mazeppa". $12,000 to $15,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Wounded Knee Massacre Same Day Eyewitness Account by Participant, "the 7th needn't be ashamed of today's record". $10,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> F. Scott Fitzgerald Signed Gordon Bryant Portrait -- Finest Known. $8,000 to $9,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Neil Armstrong ALS on NASA Letterhead Regarding His X-15 Flights. $7,000 to $8,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> M. Gandhi Letter: "the life span of human beings is preordained..." -- Fantastic Spiritual Content. $7,000 to $8,000.
    <center><b>University Archives<br>Autographs, Books & Relics Including Kerouac Estate<br>& Hemingway<br>February 26, 2020</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> "Damn the torpedoes!" Riveting 24pp ALS of Admiral Farragut's Steward Describing the "Battle of Mobile Bay”. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Abraham Lincoln Signed Order to Suspend Execution. $5,000 to $6,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 26:</b> Napoleon DS Featuring Imperial Eagle and Enormous Great Seal Appointing Norman Politician Baron of the Empire. $4,000 to $5,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.
  • <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Nebel, Carl. The War Between the United States and Mexico. New York, 1851. $270,000 - $300,000 MXN / USD $15,000 - $16,666
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Nebel, Carl. The War Between the United States and Mexico. New York, 1851. $270,000 - $300,000 MXN / USD $15,000 - $16,666
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Bolaños, Joaquín. La Portentosa Vida de la Muerte... (“The Portentous Life of Death”) México, 1792. $50,000 - $60,000 MXN / USD $2,777 - $3,333
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Tratado de Paz… entre la República Mexicana y los Estados Unidos. (“Treaty of Peace… Between the Mexican Republic and the United States”) 1848. $80,000 - $90,000 MXN / USD $4,444 - $5,000
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Fabregat, Josep Joaquín. Vista de la Plaza de México… (“View of the Square of Mexico”) México, 1797. $60,000 - $100,000 MXN / USD $3,333 - $5,555
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Hidalgo y Costilla, Miguel. Invitación al Coronel Narciso de la Canal… (“Invitation to Coronel Narciso de la Canal…”) 1810. $170,000 - $200,000 MXN / USD $9,444 - $11,111
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Gálvez, Joseph de. Real Cédula de Erección de la Compañía de Filipinas. (“Royal Notice of the Creation of the Company of the Philippines”) 1785. $40,000 - $60,000 MXN / USD $2,222 - $3,333
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Colección de Constituciones de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos (“Collection of Constitutions of the United Mexican States”) México, 1828. $50,000 - $60,000 MXN / USD $2,777 - $3,333
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Ruelas, Julio. Poemario Manuscrito Ilustrado, Dedicado a Lorencita Braniff (“Collection of Illustrated Poem Manuscripts, Dedicated to Lorencita Braniff”). 1903. $60,000 - $70,000 MXN / USD $3,333 - $3,888
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Espinosa de los Monteros, Juan J. Aviso de la Junta Soberana al Público (“Notice of the Sovereign Meeting to the Public”) 1821. $60,000 - $80,000 MXN / USD $3,333 - $4,444
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Constitución Federal de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos... (“Federal Constitution of the United Mexican States”) México, 1824. $140,000 - $150,000 MXN / USD $7,777 - $8,333
    <b>Morton Subastas, Feb 25:</b> Alcaraz, Ramón. Apuntes para la Historia de la Guerra entre México y los EU (“Notes on the History of the War between Mexico and the United States”). 1848. $40,000 - $50,000 MXN / USD $2,222 - $2,777
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €

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