Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2015 Issue

Twenty Years in the Making – Amazon Opens First Bricks & Mortar Bookstore

Db6beba3-2cee-4820-a5ac-84cf0f2f71be

Amazon's first bricks and mortar store (photo courtesy Amazon.com).

If you can beat them, join them anyway. In a surprising twist to a story that began twenty years ago, Amazon.com has come full circle. After crushing countless bookstores, from small independents to large chains, Amazon has opened its first bricks and mortar bookstore. We are confident this is not some part of a nefarious twenty-year plot to destroy existing bookstores so they could have the physical store trade all to themselves. Whether this will spread beyond the first store in Amazon's hometown of Seattle will undoubtedly depend upon its performance.

 

Amazon's first physical bookstore opened its doors on November 3. As Amazon Books VP Jennifer Cast noted in a letter to Amazon customers, "These aren’t metaphorical doors: these real, wooden doors are the entrance to our new store in Seattle’s University Village." She then goes on to explain a bit more about the store, which provides some insight into Amazon's thinking: "Amazon Books is a physical extension of Amazon.com. We’ve applied 20 years of online bookselling experience to build a store that integrates the benefits of offline and online book shopping. The books in our store are selected based on Amazon.com customer ratings, pre-orders, sales, popularity on Goodreads, and our curators’ assessments. These are fantastic books! Most have been rated 4 stars or above, and many are award winners."

 

What we see here is Amazon leveraging the enormous amount of information they have collected about book buyers and their reading habits to gain a competitive advantage on other bookstores with less data to draw upon. Being able to draw on a huge base of data Amazon knows what books customers buy, which ones they like the most, which new books to stock because customers are placing heavy pre-orders. The cherry-picking of books rated 4 stars or above means they will not be filling their shelves with books that will disappoint buyers.

 

Unstated is that Amazon will also be able to target individual stores depending on their geography. They already know which books are most popular in each zip code. If their second store is in Des Moines, it will likely carry a different selection from the one in Seattle. Our instincts, and those of a typical store manager, might say to stock more books in Seattle about brewing coffee than raising hogs. Amazon won't have to rely on instincts, which may be wrong. They will know precisely which books are likely to be better sellers at the Seattle store. Advantage Amazon.

 

This is not a giant store. It is not a Barnes & Noble, with coffee and pastries. The fact that they will be displaying books cover out, rather than by the spine in shelves, reduces the number they can sell in a limited amount of space. Naturally, they will be able to help customers draw from the millions of books available on their website. While Amazon, which started as an online bookstore, now sells just about everything under the sun, the store will be limited to their book roots. A few of their own, related electronic products, such as the Kindle e-reader, will be available, but there will be no vacuum cleaners for sale in the Amazon bookstore.

 

Time will tell whether this is a good idea. Certainly, they will sell more books in the area around their store. Some will be cannibalized from online sales, but perhaps that will be balanced by customers who come into the store but then buy a book (perhaps one not stocked in the store) online. However, operating a store adds greatly to expenses. The success of their online model is based on being able to sell goods efficiently and cheaply. The store will require paying rent, hiring staff, and various other expenses not part of their current model.

 

Perhaps they are looking at the marginal business model of other booksellers and believe their advantages in information will make it all worthwhile. Maybe, but I doubt they are trying to emulate Barnes & Noble, just doing it a little better. My guess is they are trying to emulate their much bigger rival that has had great success adding stores to their selling mix – Apple. Apple's stores have been enormously successful, both in selling Apple merchandise on the spot and supporting other means of selling. However, Apple sells far more expensive items and at very large margins. They also sell items where technical expertise is more important to closing a sale than it is with books. Whether Amazon can duplicate Apple's store success, perhaps on a smaller scale, remains to be seen. But borrowing another old saying, nothing ventured, nothing gained.


Posted On: 2015-12-01 05:46
User Name: rlura

Thanks for this interesting piece. It certainly is thought-provoking to have Amazon open a store. But I'm confused about how the numbers of having a bookstore could add up for a company like Amazon. Even if the store was wildly successful, it still would have no impact on the company's profit margins, unless they open a store in every city, perhaps. My guess is that this is largely a public relations project. I don't know when the plan for the store was first initiated, but Amazon is aware that their image as seller of books is still a fundamental aspect to their brand. This store will help make them appear to "like" bookstores, as if they were one of them. Plus having received such bad press recently in their handling of publishers contracts and the rage they inspired when some authors' books were intentionally delayed in shipping, etc., opening this "old fashioned" bookstore will help boost their image, something which undoubtedly has suffered lately.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana<br>February 20, 2020</b>
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Harriet Tubman Cabinet Card by H.S. Squyer, Auburn, NY, 1892. $10,000 to $15,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Scarce <i>Events of the Tulsa Disaster,</i> First Edition, 1922. $4,000 to $6,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Unpublished CDV of Frederick Douglass by Benjamin F. Smith, 1864. $3,000 to $5,000
    <center><b>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana<br>February 20, 2020</b>
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> California Imprint of <i>President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation</i> Broadside, 1864. $10,000 to $15,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> John C.H. Grabill Cabinet Card of Buffalo Soldier Wearing Buffalo Coat, ca 1886. $8,000 to $10,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Rare <i>What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking,</i> 2nd Cookbook Published by African American. $6,000 to $8,000
    <center><b>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana<br>February 20, 2020</b>
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Frederick Douglass Walking Stick, 1888. $3,000 to $5,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Only Known Slave Narrative Published Independently in California, <i>Life and Adventures of James Williams.</i> $2,000 to $4,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Rare First Edition of History of Black Literature, Abbé Grégoire <i>De La Littérature des Nègres</i>. $2,500 to $3,000
    <center><b>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana<br>February 20, 2020</b>
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> African American Soldier and Medal of Honor Winner Christian A. Fleetwood CDV, PLUS. $8,000 to $10,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Jack Johnson vs. Jim Jeffries Pennant, 1910 Reno, Nevada. $2,000 to $4,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Joe Gans Photograph at 1906 Goldfield, Nevada Fight by Percy Dana. $600 to $800
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions