• <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Your Own Sylvia:<br>Sylvia Plath’s letters to Ted Hughes and other items,<br>Property of Frieda Hughes<br>9 to 21 July 2021</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Family photograph album ("The Hughes family Album"), 1957-1962. £30,000 to £50,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Typed letter signed, to Ted Hughes, on "my own private doctrine", with a poem, 5 October 1956. £15,000 to £20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Pen and ink portrait of Ted Hughes, [1956]. £10,000 to £15,000.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Your Own Sylvia:<br>Sylvia Plath’s letters to Ted Hughes and other items,<br>Property of Frieda Hughes<br>9 to 21 July 2021</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. Joint autograph letter signed, to William and Edith Hughes, March 1960. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes. Photographic portrait by David Bailey, inscribed by Plath, 1961, and another press photo. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Tarot de Marseille. Deck of cards owned by Sylvia Plath. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes. Pair of gold wedding rings. £6,000 to £8,000.
  • <b>Trillium, July 24:</b> de Bry, Theodor. Allegory of The Discovery of America or Americae Retectio - Series of Four Plates. $8,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 24:</b> de Wit, Frederik. Map of the World published 1670 - Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula ex Officina F. de Wit Amstelodami. $5,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 24:</b> Chéret, Jules. Maitres de l'Affiche by MUCHA - La Samaritaine. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <center><b>Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books<br>Fine Art<br>Antique Engravings & Lithographs<br>Works on Paper<br>July 24, 2021</b>
    <b>Trillium, July 24:</b> Gould, John. Eagle Owl. Folio lithograph from <i>Birds of Great Britain</i>. $2,500 to $4,500.
    <b>Trillium, July 24:</b> Valentijn, Francois. First Printed Map of Formosa, Taiwan. $2,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 24:</b> Catherwood. Las Monjas Chichen Itza. Folio lithograph from <i>Views of Ancient Monuments in Central America, Chiapas and Yucatan</i>. $1,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Trillium, July 24:</b> Roberts, David. The Great Sphinx, Pyramids of Gizeh. Lithograph from <i>Views in the Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt, & Nubia</i>. $1,000 to $2,000.
    <center><b>Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books<br>Fine Art<br>Antique Engravings & Lithographs<br>Works on Paper<br>July 24, 2021</b>
  • <b><center>Case Antiques<br>Summer 2021 Auction<br>July 24 & 25</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> <i>The Writings of Henry David Thoreau,</i> Manuscript Edition, 20 vols., 1906. Published signed. $5,200 to $6,000.
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Thomas McKenney and James Hall. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America,</i> vol. one (only). 32 plates present. $2,400 to $2,800.
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Harry Truman. Signing Pen for Bill, Signed Photo, and additional Truman photos. $1,400 to $1,800.
    <b><center>Case Antiques<br>Summer 2021 Auction<br>July 24 & 25</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Johannes Zahn. Pair of 17th century hand colored, copperplate engraved Baroque celestial maps. $1,400 to $1,600.
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> NASA Astronaut Related Archive with autographs, 89 items. $1,000 to $1,400.
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Columbia STS-1 Archive, incl. Flown Artifacts. $1,200 to $1,400.
    <b><center>Case Antiques<br>Summer 2021 Auction<br>July 24 & 25</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Archive: Wm. Vance of Memphis, TN, Slave and Lincoln Assassination interest. $1,000 to $1,200.
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Civil War CDV Album, incl. Presidents, Union & Confederate Leaders. $800 to $850.
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Group of 4 Limited Editions Club Signed Books, incl. R. Bradbury, H. G. Wells. $800 to $1,000.
    <b><center>Case Antiques<br>Summer 2021 Auction<br>July 24 & 25</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Document archive related to the family of Judge John Williams Green of Culpeper County, Virginia, 80 items total. $800 to $1,000.
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Governor of Tennessee Samuel Houston (1793-1863) signed land document. $800 to $1,000.
    <b>Case Antiques, July 24-25:</b> Archive of fifty-eight (58) items pertaining to Peter Gordon, Merchant of Alexandria and Fredericksburg, Virginia. $500 to $600.
  • <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> OUTHWAITE, Ida Rentoul. FROG TEACHER LEADING ELF PUPILS ... Watercolour, c.1920.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> SATO, Gyro. [GENDAI RYOKI SENTAN ZUKAN]. Tokyo : Shinchosa, 1931.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> CARROLL, Lewis. ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND. London : Macmillan and Co., 1868.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> FLEMING, Ian and MILLER, Albert. CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG. New York : Random House, 1968.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> PHOENIX. Adelaide : Adelaide University Union, 1939.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> BOWEN, Emmanuel. A complete map of the Southern Continent. London : 1744.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> NORTHFIELD, James. AUSTRALIA. Melbourne : Northfield Studios and J.E. Hackett, c.1935

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - August - 2015 Issue

Electronic Catalogues: their day has come

46738721-b54b-4fe1-b2cb-1d2108f8660d

Electronic catalogues are gaining traction

The wheels of progress turn slowly.  Over the long haul change can appear inevitable but nearer by seems much less conclusive.  Such are the changes in cataloging that have been transforming the rare book and paper field now for more than two decades.

 

There was a time, not so long ago, when cataloguing was rudimentary; the assumption that the reader could translate embedded clues into a full-fledged story.  Hence an enormously important item might once have warranted only a single page of small print in 1880 and an entire catalogue unto itself just recently.  Scale has long been a predictor of importance.

 

Cataloging is the bedrock of catalogue issuance and scale and more recently images the measure of implied value.  Flipping through an expertly prepared catalogue the reader could immediately divine some of the intellectual underpinnings and the preferences of the cataloguers.  For this reason great catalogues were events and for those preparing them:  achievements.  For this reason the greatest catalogues became collectible within the trade, the knowledgeable specialist surrounding themselves with the best thinking of the experts and the best writing in the category.  Those scholars and heroes might be long gone but their words and thinking still resonated with the modern day cataloguer who sought, not just the facts, but also a deeper understanding to be presented in the printed catalogue form.

 

But this is changing.

 

The paper catalogue appears to have had its day.  It has been more than 150 years since the book catalogue emerged as an important sales tool.  The most important was the bookshop but their reach was local.  With the coming of the penny post a shop could reach a regional audience and deliver efficiently.  This lead to an explosion in catalogues, the first ones rudimentary, the later examples increasingly complex.

 

The early part of the 20th century saw a rapid rise in scholarship that made it increasingly easy to understand importance and rarity.  In time libraries became the great collectors and there were thousands of them.  Private collectors also collected but acquisitive libraries would keep the market tight for some sixty years [1920-1980].

 

The field along the way shifted toward higher value material in a world dominated by specialists.  In retrospect it's obvious that the explosion in careful cataloguing provided increasing perspective on importance and rarity.  But this information was for years not easily accessible outside the trade.  One needed to know where to look and then to have access.  Neither was easy and so the field continued essentially unchanging even as greater and greater changes loomed.

 

CD-ROMS may have looked innocent but they were not.  They could hold a universe of information and discharge their facts efficiently in a few seconds.  They had their run but had the bad fortune to live in the narrow netherworld between the end of the traditional catalogue and the first of the online databases.  The online databases would soon explode and the specialized knowledge of the dealer be cast across the planet for the interested to extract and dissect.

 

Some twenty years later we can now see the outcome, that printed catalogues are disappearing, that scholarship is increasing, that the price/value construct that was once entirely the dealer’s province is now a database driven comparison/calculation of quality, importance, and number of copies known.

 

Integral to this process and a sign that the shift from old standards to new is well underway is the shift from printed to electronic catalogues.  They are quicker and much less expensive, easier to tailor, more elaborate in their design, and easier and less expensive to send.  The most telling indication is their numbers.  Until a few years ago paper versions continued to outnumber their electronic cousins.  Today electronic catalogues predominate and they are accelerating. 

 

I asked Bill Reese about his experience.  He said that electronic catalogues have been steadily gaining and he’s now investing more time in them, an example of [his are linked here].  As Alexander Graham Bell said, “as one door closes another opens.”  Traditional catalogues are great fun but their best days are behind them.  And increasingly electronic catalogues are simply more effective.  So, as a collector, think about the world as it will be rather than how it was.  That’s where you are going to find the next generation of great material.


Posted On: 2015-08-01 11:56
User Name: tenpound

Bruce:

One of the great advantages of digital catalogs is that color illustrations are no longer an additional expense. Therefore electronic catalogs tend to be brighter and more heavily illustrated than old fashioned paper ones.

I thought it odd that the example you linked to - the otherwise excellent catalog of your old friend Bill Reese - was so short on color. Your readers should go to http://tenpound.com/bookmans-log/catalog/maritime-list-230 to see a more typical use of color in a digital catalog.

Greg Gibson


Posted On: 2015-08-02 23:28
User Name: bjarnetokerud

Buyer response to my printed catalog beats responses to pdf's of the same catalog by a factor of approximately 90%, in other words 90 buyers out of 100 respond to the mailed catalogue with a phone or email purchase or just a phone call to say hello. Perhaps it is because most of my mailing list consists of private buyers 60 years old or more. Some have written "just send me a pdf" whereas others have said, "I want the printed catalog only." Having said that, the "playing field" is evened out so that pdf's or an emailed link reaches everyone more or less at the same time, rather than uneven lags of days, weeks or even a month. Having once spent $10K+ to print several hundred copies of a catalog with colour illustrations here and there, the cost savings of going to pdf's or an html catalog are certainly very tempting. Is this not a similar argument as to whether certain kinds of books are better off as pdf's or e-books? I use left over printed catalogs as business cards. Far more impressive to my mind than "Let me email you a link to my last catalog". Let us have the best of both worlds! Bjarne Tokerud, Bjarne Tokerud Bookseller Inc.


Posted On: 2015-08-06 17:34
User Name: greenbooks497

Next up --- the video catalog.

Some book sellers are putting the toes in the water in this area. by showcasing special books. Here's a fine example from Peter Harrington. http://www.peterharrington.co.uk/video/origin-species-means-natural-selection-charles-darwin/

One needs only Iphone and Tripod to do this type of work. Very simple. Obviously you wouldn't make a video for is for a $25 book but I bet this is a powerful selling tool done in 1/2 the time of writing a detailed catalog description.

As a collector it would be great to have a respected book seller like Greg walking me through a book in this fashion.

It needn't be as polished as the Harrington video. Jett Whitehead has done some nice no-fuss 2:00 minute videos of some of his higher end stock. These can be used through social networking channels.

This is also a way for dealers to really show their expertise and add value and context to the material.

Also, how about a live interactive Skype catalog event? Make it a quarterly. Invite your customers for live showing of the books -- and take questions. I'd sign up!


Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> SHAKESPEARE, William. <i>Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Published according to the true originall copies.</i> London, Tho Cotes, for Robert Allot, 1632.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> STAHL, Augusto. <i>Panorama of Rio de Janiero.</i> c.1859. 3-part albumen print panorama (266 x 1186mm.).
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> WILDE, Oscar. <i>Lady Windermere's Fan</i>. London: Elkin Mathews & John Lane, 1893. Presentation copy.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> DE TOCQUEVILLE, Alexis. <i>De la Democratie en Amerique.</i> Paris: Pagnerre, 1850. Thirteenth Edition. Presentation copy.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> CHAUDRON, A[delaide] de V[endel]. <i>Chaudron’s Spelling Book.</i> Mobile (AL): S.H. Goetzel, 1865.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> SAINT CHER, Hugh of. <i>Commentary on Peter Lombard’s Sentences, with the Abridgement of the Sentences.</i> Eastern France, illuminated manuscript., first half of the fifteenth century.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> LANE, Thomas. <i>The Crystal Palace.</i> London, 1851.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> B[ULWER], J[ohn]. <i>Anthropometamorphosis: man transform’d: or, the artificiall changling historically presented…</i> London: William Hunt, 1653.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> VOLTAIRE, François-Marie Arouet de. <i>Oeuvres de M. de Voltaire.</i> Dresden, George-Conrad Walther (i.e. Leipzig, Breitkopf), 1748-1750.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> HAWKING, Stephen & Leonard Mlodinow. <i>The Grand Design.</i> London: Bantam Books, 2011.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> FIELDS, James T. <i>Yesterdays with Authors.</i> With fine manuscript letter by Charles Dickens, and autograph letters from Forster, Landor, Mitford and others.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> <i>Kit, the Arkansas Traveller Broadside.</i> Chromolithograph.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Charles Loupot, <i>Les Cigarettes Mekka,</i> 1919. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Plinio Codognato, <i>Cicli Fiat,</i> circa 1910. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> L.N. Britton, <i>Warning! Consider the Possible Consequences,</i> c. 1917. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Leonardo Bistolfi, <i>Première Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs Modernes,</i> 1902. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Leonetto Cappiello, <i>Paquet Pernot / Biscuits Pernot,</i> 1910. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jul 15:</b> Jessie Tarbox Beals, archive of signed photographs, 15 silver prints, c. 1930. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Francesco Nonni, <i>Font Meo / Acqua Minerale Naturale,</i> 1924. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Frederick Winthrop Ramsdell, <i>American Crescent Cycles,</i> 1899. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> <i>Be a Tight Wad! Own Something!</i> designer unknown, 1925. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Candido Aragonese de Faria, <i>Chamonix–Mont–Blanc,</i> c. 1910. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> W.E.J., <i>Irishmen Avenge the Lusitania,</i> c. 1915. $2,000 to $3,000.

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions