• <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b> NASA archive with 351 photographs, silver & chromogenic prints, 1960-2002. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b> Edward S. Curtis, suite of 18 cyanotypes, 1910-14. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b> Edward S. Curtis, <i>Horse Capture, Atsina,</i> unique copper plate for <i>The North American Indian,</i> 1908. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b> John Whipple, <i>Harriet Beecher Stowe,</i> salted print from a calotype negative, 1853. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b> Lewis Carroll, <i>Xie Kitchen,</i> albumen print, circa 1872. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b> Ansel Adams, <i>Taos Pueblo,</i> limited, signed first edition of the artist's first book, 12 silver bromide prints, 1930. $30,000 to $45,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b><br>JFK in his motorcade about 2 mins before his assassination, chromogenic print, 1963. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b> Anton Guilio Bragaglia, 6 photomechanical postcards with facsimile signatures, 1911-13, printed 1932. $30,000 to $45,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 21:</b> Société Anonyme, Inc, group of 9 postcards, including 8 real photo postcards, 1920-30. $25,000 to $35,000.
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar 12:</b> Walt Whitman. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> First edition, first issue, SIGNED in block letters by Whitman. 1855. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 12:</b> Isaac Newton's copy of John Greave's <i>Pyramidographia,</i> London, 1646. $50,000 to $70,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 12:</b> Colonel John Mosby. Robert E. Lee's autograph letter to Samuel Cooper reporting on Mosby's exploits, with Cooper's autograph note ordering his appointment to Major.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 12:</b> Gyula Halasz Brassai. Large archive of autograph and typed letters, over 260, to his family including his wife Gilberte, 1947-1978. $40,000 to $60,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 12:</b> Archive of drawings and letters from Harper Lee to Charles Carruth, including an inscribed first edition of <i>To Kill a Mockingbird.</i> $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 11:</b> VESALIUS, ANDREAS. 1514-1564. <i>De humani corporis fabrica libri septem.</i> Basel: Johannes Oporinus, June 1543. $300,000 to $500,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 11:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. 1578-1657. <i>De motu cordis & sanguinis in animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Leiden: Joannis Maire, 1639. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 11:</b> BERENGARIO DA CARPI, GIACOMO. 1460-1530. <i>Isagogae breves perlucide ac uberrimae in Anatomiam humani corporis.</i> Bologna: Benedictus Hectoris, 15 July 1523. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Bonhams NY, Mar 11:</b> FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN. 1706-1790. <i>Experiments and Observations on Electricity, made at Philadelphia in America…</i> London, 1769. $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Bonhams NY, Mar 11:</b> BENIVIENI, ANTONIO. 1443-1502. <i>De abditis nonnullis ac mirandis morborum et sanationum causis.</i>Florence: Filippo Giunta, 1507. $8,000 to $12,000
  • <b>Bonhams: Treasures from the Eric C. Caren Collection: How History Unfolds on Paper, Part VII (Online). March 6-14, 2019</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Albert Einstein A remarkable letter on God in English, one of his most eloquent and quoted, 1 p, July 2, 1945. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Benjamin Lincoln's commission as Major General in the Continental Army, February 19th, 1777. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Broadside. A Poem Upon the Bloody Engagement That Was Fought on Bunker's-Hill. 1775. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Early, full printing of the Star-Spangled Banner in The Yankee, October 7, 1814. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Paul Revere. Engraving, “The Boston Massacre Perpetrated on March 5, 1770," in <i>Massachusett's Calendar 1772.</i> $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams: Treasures from the Eric C. Caren Collection: How History Unfolds on Paper, Part VII (Online). March 6-14, 2019</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Earliest known newspaper coverage of Babe Ruth, "a St Mary's schoolboy," Baltimore, April 4, 1914. $6,000 to $9,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Franklin, Benjamin. <i>The Independent Whig.</i> First Magazine Published in America, Philadelphia: Keimer, 1723-4. $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Smith, Joseph. <i>The Book of Mormon.</i> Palmyra: Printed by E.B. Grandin for the Author, 1830. First printing. $40,000 to $60,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Last Words of Joseph Smith. Autograph Letter Signed from a Mormon disciple, conveying a contemporary account of the Prophet's final words, Nauvoo, July 27, 1844. $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> John Brown's Body. Autograph Letter Signed from the daughter of John Brown attempting to arrange the return of her father's body, North Elba, Essex Co, NY, November 29, 1859. $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar 6-14:</b> Powell Expedition. Autograph diary of Rhodes C. Allen kept during the Powell Expedition of 1868, June 29, 1868 - November 16, 1868. $20,000 to $40,000
  • <b>Chiswick Auctions: Autographs & Memorabilia. February 28, 2019</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 28:</b> Autograph album featuring signatures by prominent actors, politicians, musicians and authors, including Rudolph Valentino. £1,000 to £1,500
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 28:</b> An extremely rare working radio script for Crazy People No 29, the first series of <i>The Goon Show.</i> £600 to £800
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 28:</b> Manuscript prayer book, in German. 8vo, 1755 £800 to £1,200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 28:</b> Italian Manuscript on Geometry, with diagrams, 18th century. £500 to £700
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Ornithology, Zoology & Voyages. February 27, 2019</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 27:</b> Thorburn (Archibald). Sparrowhawk, original watercolour & gouache, signed & dated lower right, 1917. £1,500 to £2,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 27:</b> Burton (Sir Richard Francis). <i>Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to El-Medinah and Meccah.</i> 3 vol., FIRST EDITION, 1855-56. £1,000 to £1,500
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 27:</b> [Mount (Richard) & Page (Thomas)]. <i>The English Pilot. Describing the Sea-Coasts…</i> 31 engraved maps, W. & J. Mount, T. Page, 1756 £4000 to £6000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Ornithology, Zoology & Voyages. February 27, 2019</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 27:</b> D’apres De Mannevillette (Jean-Baptiste Nicolas Denis). <i>Le Neptune Oriental.</i> Paris & Brest, [1775 – 1781]. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 27:</b> Loring (Josiah). Terrestrial Globe Containing all the Late Discoveries and Geographical Improvements. Boston, Gilman Joslin, 1846, £800 to £1,200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Feb 27:</b> Shelley (G. E., Capt.). <i>A Monograph of the Nectariniidae, or Family of Sun-birds,</i> FIRST EDITION, by the Author, 1876-80. £4,000 to £6,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - August - 2015 Issue

Electronic Catalogues: their day has come

46738721-b54b-4fe1-b2cb-1d2108f8660d

Electronic catalogues are gaining traction

The wheels of progress turn slowly.  Over the long haul change can appear inevitable but nearer by seems much less conclusive.  Such are the changes in cataloging that have been transforming the rare book and paper field now for more than two decades.

 

There was a time, not so long ago, when cataloguing was rudimentary; the assumption that the reader could translate embedded clues into a full-fledged story.  Hence an enormously important item might once have warranted only a single page of small print in 1880 and an entire catalogue unto itself just recently.  Scale has long been a predictor of importance.

 

Cataloging is the bedrock of catalogue issuance and scale and more recently images the measure of implied value.  Flipping through an expertly prepared catalogue the reader could immediately divine some of the intellectual underpinnings and the preferences of the cataloguers.  For this reason great catalogues were events and for those preparing them:  achievements.  For this reason the greatest catalogues became collectible within the trade, the knowledgeable specialist surrounding themselves with the best thinking of the experts and the best writing in the category.  Those scholars and heroes might be long gone but their words and thinking still resonated with the modern day cataloguer who sought, not just the facts, but also a deeper understanding to be presented in the printed catalogue form.

 

But this is changing.

 

The paper catalogue appears to have had its day.  It has been more than 150 years since the book catalogue emerged as an important sales tool.  The most important was the bookshop but their reach was local.  With the coming of the penny post a shop could reach a regional audience and deliver efficiently.  This lead to an explosion in catalogues, the first ones rudimentary, the later examples increasingly complex.

 

The early part of the 20th century saw a rapid rise in scholarship that made it increasingly easy to understand importance and rarity.  In time libraries became the great collectors and there were thousands of them.  Private collectors also collected but acquisitive libraries would keep the market tight for some sixty years [1920-1980].

 

The field along the way shifted toward higher value material in a world dominated by specialists.  In retrospect it's obvious that the explosion in careful cataloguing provided increasing perspective on importance and rarity.  But this information was for years not easily accessible outside the trade.  One needed to know where to look and then to have access.  Neither was easy and so the field continued essentially unchanging even as greater and greater changes loomed.

 

CD-ROMS may have looked innocent but they were not.  They could hold a universe of information and discharge their facts efficiently in a few seconds.  They had their run but had the bad fortune to live in the narrow netherworld between the end of the traditional catalogue and the first of the online databases.  The online databases would soon explode and the specialized knowledge of the dealer be cast across the planet for the interested to extract and dissect.

 

Some twenty years later we can now see the outcome, that printed catalogues are disappearing, that scholarship is increasing, that the price/value construct that was once entirely the dealer’s province is now a database driven comparison/calculation of quality, importance, and number of copies known.

 

Integral to this process and a sign that the shift from old standards to new is well underway is the shift from printed to electronic catalogues.  They are quicker and much less expensive, easier to tailor, more elaborate in their design, and easier and less expensive to send.  The most telling indication is their numbers.  Until a few years ago paper versions continued to outnumber their electronic cousins.  Today electronic catalogues predominate and they are accelerating. 

 

I asked Bill Reese about his experience.  He said that electronic catalogues have been steadily gaining and he’s now investing more time in them, an example of [his are linked here].  As Alexander Graham Bell said, “as one door closes another opens.”  Traditional catalogues are great fun but their best days are behind them.  And increasingly electronic catalogues are simply more effective.  So, as a collector, think about the world as it will be rather than how it was.  That’s where you are going to find the next generation of great material.


Posted On: 2015-08-01 11:56
User Name: tenpound

Bruce:

One of the great advantages of digital catalogs is that color illustrations are no longer an additional expense. Therefore electronic catalogs tend to be brighter and more heavily illustrated than old fashioned paper ones.

I thought it odd that the example you linked to - the otherwise excellent catalog of your old friend Bill Reese - was so short on color. Your readers should go to http://tenpound.com/bookmans-log/catalog/maritime-list-230 to see a more typical use of color in a digital catalog.

Greg Gibson


Posted On: 2015-08-02 23:28
User Name: bjarnetokerud

Buyer response to my printed catalog beats responses to pdf's of the same catalog by a factor of approximately 90%, in other words 90 buyers out of 100 respond to the mailed catalogue with a phone or email purchase or just a phone call to say hello. Perhaps it is because most of my mailing list consists of private buyers 60 years old or more. Some have written "just send me a pdf" whereas others have said, "I want the printed catalog only." Having said that, the "playing field" is evened out so that pdf's or an emailed link reaches everyone more or less at the same time, rather than uneven lags of days, weeks or even a month. Having once spent $10K+ to print several hundred copies of a catalog with colour illustrations here and there, the cost savings of going to pdf's or an html catalog are certainly very tempting. Is this not a similar argument as to whether certain kinds of books are better off as pdf's or e-books? I use left over printed catalogs as business cards. Far more impressive to my mind than "Let me email you a link to my last catalog". Let us have the best of both worlds! Bjarne Tokerud, Bjarne Tokerud Bookseller Inc.


Posted On: 2015-08-06 17:34
User Name: greenbooks497

Next up --- the video catalog.

Some book sellers are putting the toes in the water in this area. by showcasing special books. Here's a fine example from Peter Harrington. http://www.peterharrington.co.uk/video/origin-species-means-natural-selection-charles-darwin/

One needs only Iphone and Tripod to do this type of work. Very simple. Obviously you wouldn't make a video for is for a $25 book but I bet this is a powerful selling tool done in 1/2 the time of writing a detailed catalog description.

As a collector it would be great to have a respected book seller like Greg walking me through a book in this fashion.

It needn't be as polished as the Harrington video. Jett Whitehead has done some nice no-fuss 2:00 minute videos of some of his higher end stock. These can be used through social networking channels.

This is also a way for dealers to really show their expertise and add value and context to the material.

Also, how about a live interactive Skype catalog event? Make it a quarterly. Invite your customers for live showing of the books -- and take questions. I'd sign up!


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Morton Subastas on Bidsquare:</b><br>Die Französische Expedition gegen Mexico /Beilagen zum Beiheft des Militair - Wochenblattes
    <b>Morton Subastas on Bidsquare:</b><br>The Architecture Of M. Vitruvius Pollio. London, 1791.
    <b>Morton Subastas on Bidsquare:</b> Estatuto Provisional del Imperio Mexicano. México: Imprenta de Andrade y Escalante, 1865.
    <b>Morton Subastas on Bidsquare:</b> Historia de Méjico... México, 1849 - 1852.
    <b>Morton Subastas on Bidsquare:</b> Juárez, Benito - Ogazón, Pedro. Legajos de Bandos del Estado de Guadalajara, 1860-1863.
    <b>Morton Subastas on Bidsquare:</b> Sigüenza y Góngora, Carlos. Mapa de las Aguas que por el Círculo de 90 Leguas Vienen a la Laguna de Tescuco... Méx, 1748.
    <b>Morton Subastas on Bidsquare:</b> Cruces y Campa / Aubert / Valleto. Pareja Imperial, Fusilamiento de Maximiliano, Tipos Mexicanos... ca,1875.
  • <b>Christie’s Paris, 20 Feb:</b> BELON. <i>L’Histoire de la nature des oyseaux.</i> Paris : Corrozet, 1555. $17,000 to $23,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, 20 Feb:</b> MIOMANDRE – BARBIER. <i>Dessins sur les danses de Vaslav Nijinsky.</i> Paris. 1913. $23,000 to $34,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, 20 Feb:</b> HOKUSAI. <i>Fugaku Hyakkei, Edo : Nishimura Yûzô.</i> 1834-1875. $58,000 to $80,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, 20 Feb:</b> EDWARDS. <i> <br>A Natural History of Uncommon Birds…</i> London : Printed for the Author. 1743-1764. $35,000 to $46,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, 20 Feb:</b> VESALIUS. <i><br> De Humane Corporis Fabrica libri septem...</i> Basle : J. Oporinus. 1555. $58,000 to $80,000

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