Rare Book Monthly

Articles - January - 2015 Issue

Is This Writer's Archive Too Valuable to Mention Its Price?

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Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Has the value of archives of notable writers become so great that buyers no longer dare speak their cost, for fear of driving up future prices to even more outrageous levels? It would seem so, at least that is the fear at the University of Texas' library. Library officials have petitioned the state to keep the price of a recently purchased writer's archive secret from public records scrutiny for precisely that reason.

 

A few weeks ago, the Harry Ransom Center of the University of Texas announced that it had acquired the archives of Latin American writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Marquez, born in Columbia, but spending most of his career in Mexico, is without question one of the greatest Latin writers of the twentieth century. His most well known work is One Hundred Years of Solitude, the tracking of a family through generations covering 100 years, but there are several other important works to his name. Marquez certainly had his misgivings about the United States, as do many from that side of the border who have not always appreciated American involvement in their nations' affairs. Nonetheless, when it came time for Marquez' family to find a repository for Marquez' work, letters, manuscripts, drafts, reams of material from a lifetime, they chose the University of Texas.

 

Perhaps the choice is not so surprising. Maybe it was a simple financial choice by the family. The University of Texas' secretiveness over the price does not imply they got a bargain. However, there may have been more than just Yankee dollars in mind when the Marquez family made its choice. The Ransom Center already holds archives of major writers, such as Eliot, Hemingway, Shaw, Steinbeck, and Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges. The critical factor here may have been care and security rather than money. The United States is more stable than most of its neighbors, and few Latin libraries may be in as secure a position to guarantee the long term preservation of these papers like the University of Texas. Preservation has to have been a critical element in the Marquez family decision, and it is doubtful they could have made a more secure one, especially in a location so close to, or with so much shared history with Mexico.

 

A couple of weeks later, the AP put in a public records request to learn the price the university had paid for the archive. Officials were no longer so talkative. They have asked the Texas Attorney General for an exemption from publicly releasing the purchase price. The university's explanation was that revealing the price would drive up the cost of future archives. A university spokesman was quoted as saying, “Sellers routinely look for a precedent-setting price so they can set increasingly higher prices that hurt the university, and hurt the taxpayers who help fund the university.”

 

The logic seems a bit strange to us. It almost sounds as if they believe they overpaid. Clearly, this archive was not cheap. Past purchases would imply the cost was in seven figures, though how far into them I would not care to speculate. Transparency works both ways, as likely to hold prices down as move them up, unless their belief is that they overpaid. Whatever the University of Texas paid for this archive, the next one will be priced according to the market at that time, and barring other considerations will go to the highest bidder, be it relatively higher or lower than what UT paid for the Marquez archive.

 

Perhaps there is another consideration here, that Texans may understand. A few blocks down the street from the University of Texas is the Texas state legislature. Not all of its members are terribly enlightened. Almost assuredly, some have no clue who Gabriel Garcia Marquez was, but they do know what a million dollars is, and they won't like the government spending taxpayer dollars on the archive of some writer who wasn't even a Texan. This might even make for good politics. The University of Texas, and undoubtedly universities in other states, sometimes have to tread lightly on their legislatures if they are to carry out their mission of education and enlightenment. If I were running the Ransom library, I would be more concerned about the legislature than the next archive seller.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €

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