Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2013 Issue

How Do You Sign an Electronic Book? Apple's Patent Shows the Way!

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Apple patent application shows how the new way of signing books works.

Electronic books offer many conveniences for readers, but are not of much use to collectors. Collecting digital copies imbedded within the tiny microchips of an electronic reader seems to be missing something important, like the touch, feel, and look of a tangible object. And, when e-books can be so easily duplicated in unlimited quantities, how would one ever know the difference between a first edition and a counterfeit? Some kind of internal date stamp? This is all terribly unsatisfying.

 

However, if this isn't bad enough, how do we deal with the most desirable of copies – the signed book? How can an author sign a digital copy? Do you bring your e-reader to a book signing and ask the author to sign the back of your device? Good luck getting a signature to stay on a plastic backing. Besides which, that still doesn't sign his book. You may have thousands stored in your electronic reader. Do e-books mean the end of signed editions? The obvious answer is “yes.” Apple, the giant computer and smart phone manufacturer, says “no.” They have filed a patent to solve this not exactly age-old problem.

 

Apple has come up with some of the greatest inventions of this century (admittedly not all that old yet). In the process, they have become the most valuable company on earth. That is a tribute to their creative genius. Nonetheless, that doesn't mean every new idea they come up with is wonderful. This idea is positively awful. Still, we will hear them out. Creative genius is not always recognized immediately.

 

In describing the need for their signed e-books, Apple's patent application tells us, “The electronic versions have some advantages over paper media products such as containing additional content, are user interactive, are cheaper to purchase, and are more convenient to carry around. However, some users still prefer paper media products for the physical attributes of paper media products, which include the ability to have a copy of a book personalized. For example, a user can go to a book signing and get his copy of the book autographed by the author. The autographed copy can hold some special meaning to the reader. Thus, there is a need for improved techniques for embedding autographs in electronic books.”

 

The patent attempts to be as broad as possible, as all patents do, but the most common example seems to work like this. You go to a book signing with your e-reader, where you presumably download the author's book. The author possesses some sort of autographed form on his/her electronic device. Likely, it's a page with an electronic facsimile of his autograph. Or, perhaps, the author has an electronic form where he can “sign” it with a personalized inscription. He then transfers it to your e-reader. Perhaps it's one of those things where you put the two devices close together and the form transfers via radio waves. Maybe the two devices need to be plugged in to each other. Whichever, an autographed title page, or some other page, arrives in your reader as part of the book. Voila! You now have a “signed” book.

 

Apple also provides for various ways of authenticating the signature. No fake electronic signatures are allowed. That would be too easy. There are various ways this might be achieved. A clever one allows a picture to be taken of you next to the author. This verifies that the author really “signed” your copy. At least it verifies it until you figure out how to photoshop your image next to the author and attach that to the appropriate electrons spinning around in your electronic device. Undoubtedly, Apple will build in all kinds of controls to prevent cheating, but will they hold up against cheating technology created 10, 20 or 50 years from now? Good luck.

 

If you care to delve into the details of this patent application, you can find it here: www.google.com/patents/US20130254284. Perhaps tomorrow's collectors will enjoy scrolling through their e-books and seeing copies with authors' signatures on them. They can hand the e-reader to their friends to display their fantastic collection. Maybe. The idea leaves me cold. E-books are wonderful for reading. They are not so good for collecting. Author signatures are for collecting, not reading. Apple seems to have this one backwards.

 

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> SHAKESPEARE, William. <i>Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Published according to the true originall copies.</i> London, Tho Cotes, for Robert Allot, 1632.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> STAHL, Augusto. <i>Panorama of Rio de Janiero.</i> c.1859. 3-part albumen print panorama (266 x 1186mm.).
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> WILDE, Oscar. <i>Lady Windermere's Fan</i>. London: Elkin Mathews & John Lane, 1893. Presentation copy.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> DE TOCQUEVILLE, Alexis. <i>De la Democratie en Amerique.</i> Paris: Pagnerre, 1850. Thirteenth Edition. Presentation copy.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> CHAUDRON, A[delaide] de V[endel]. <i>Chaudron’s Spelling Book.</i> Mobile (AL): S.H. Goetzel, 1865.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> SAINT CHER, Hugh of. <i>Commentary on Peter Lombard’s Sentences, with the Abridgement of the Sentences.</i> Eastern France, illuminated manuscript., first half of the fifteenth century.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> LANE, Thomas. <i>The Crystal Palace.</i> London, 1851.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> B[ULWER], J[ohn]. <i>Anthropometamorphosis: man transform’d: or, the artificiall changling historically presented…</i> London: William Hunt, 1653.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> VOLTAIRE, François-Marie Arouet de. <i>Oeuvres de M. de Voltaire.</i> Dresden, George-Conrad Walther (i.e. Leipzig, Breitkopf), 1748-1750.
    <center><b>The Transatlantic Book Fair<br>July 22-27, 2021</b>
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> HAWKING, Stephen & Leonard Mlodinow. <i>The Grand Design.</i> London: Bantam Books, 2011.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> FIELDS, James T. <i>Yesterdays with Authors.</i> With fine manuscript letter by Charles Dickens, and autograph letters from Forster, Landor, Mitford and others.
    <b>Transatlantic Book Fair, Jul. 22-27:</b> <i>Kit, the Arkansas Traveller Broadside.</i> Chromolithograph.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Charles Loupot, <i>Les Cigarettes Mekka,</i> 1919. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Plinio Codognato, <i>Cicli Fiat,</i> circa 1910. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> L.N. Britton, <i>Warning! Consider the Possible Consequences,</i> c. 1917. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Leonardo Bistolfi, <i>Première Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs Modernes,</i> 1902. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Leonetto Cappiello, <i>Paquet Pernot / Biscuits Pernot,</i> 1910. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jul 15:</b> Jessie Tarbox Beals, archive of signed photographs, 15 silver prints, c. 1930. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Francesco Nonni, <i>Font Meo / Acqua Minerale Naturale,</i> 1924. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Frederick Winthrop Ramsdell, <i>American Crescent Cycles,</i> 1899. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> <i>Be a Tight Wad! Own Something!</i> designer unknown, 1925. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> Candido Aragonese de Faria, <i>Chamonix–Mont–Blanc,</i> c. 1910. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 5:</b> W.E.J., <i>Irishmen Avenge the Lusitania,</i> c. 1915. $2,000 to $3,000.
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Your Own Sylvia:<br>Sylvia Plath’s letters to Ted Hughes and other items,<br>Property of Frieda Hughes<br>9 to 21 July 2021</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Family photograph album ("The Hughes family Album"), 1957-1962. £30,000 to £50,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Typed letter signed, to Ted Hughes, on "my own private doctrine", with a poem, 5 October 1956. £15,000 to £20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath. Pen and ink portrait of Ted Hughes, [1956]. £10,000 to £15,000.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Your Own Sylvia:<br>Sylvia Plath’s letters to Ted Hughes and other items,<br>Property of Frieda Hughes<br>9 to 21 July 2021</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. Joint autograph letter signed, to William and Edith Hughes, March 1960. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes. Photographic portrait by David Bailey, inscribed by Plath, 1961, and another press photo. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Tarot de Marseille. Deck of cards owned by Sylvia Plath. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 9 – 21 July:</b> Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes. Pair of gold wedding rings. £6,000 to £8,000.
  • <center><b>Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books<br>Fine Art<br>Antique Engravings & Lithographs<br>Works on Paper<br>Accepting bids until July 31</b>
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Cleveley, Jukes, & Cook - View of Charlotte Sound, New Zealand. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Peron - Platypus. $300 to $600.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Loon & Pitt - Map of the World published 1680 - <I>Orbis Terrarum nova et accuratissima tabula.</i> $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Maitres de l'Affiche by MUCHA - La Dame aux Camelias. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <center><b>Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books<br>Fine Art<br>Antique Engravings & Lithographs<br>Works on Paper<br>Accepting bids until July 31</b>
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Cause - Peony, Crocus, Dog's Tooth Violet. $400 to $800.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Redoute, Folio - Lemmonnier's Iris - Iris Monnieri. $2,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Audubon, Imperial Folio - Common American Deer. $6,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Trillium, July 31:</b> Gould - Cuvier's Toucan (Ramphastos Cuvieri). $5,000 to $8,000.
  • <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> OUTHWAITE, Ida Rentoul. FROG TEACHER LEADING ELF PUPILS ... Watercolour, c.1920.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> SATO, Gyro. [GENDAI RYOKI SENTAN ZUKAN]. Tokyo : Shinchosa, 1931.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> CARROLL, Lewis. ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND. London : Macmillan and Co., 1868.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> FLEMING, Ian and MILLER, Albert. CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG. New York : Random House, 1968.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> PHOENIX. Adelaide : Adelaide University Union, 1939.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> BOWEN, Emmanuel. A complete map of the Southern Continent. London : 1744.
    <b>ANZAAB Highlights Catalogue:</b> NORTHFIELD, James. AUSTRALIA. Melbourne : Northfield Studios and J.E. Hackett, c.1935

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