Rare Book Monthly

Articles - September - 2012 Issue

Web Courtesy - A Reflection of Self

Trollface

The "trollface," first appearing in 2008, is often used to indicate trolling in Internet culture.

I write this article on web courtesy based on my own experiences online. They include instant message chats, chat rooms, discussion forums (as a user, moderator, and administrator, at varying times), as a tech support aide for AE, and most recently and consistently, as a reader of articles and news, where user comments are usually allowed, and often abused. I have frequented the Internet since 1995, and am online in some way everyday. This is simply commentary on what I have observed, and participated in, over the last 17 years. I also want to note, I am not a psychologist, and base my own analysis off common sense and experience.

Mankind possesses something called the human condition, which encompasses everything separating us from animals, and which are not specific to gender, race, or class. Normally, Wikipedia is frowned upon as a quotable source, since anyone can add to it, but in an article about courtesy on the web, I feel it is a prime example of how powerful something can be when people work together on the Internet. So, I draw from it for my information on the human condition. It begins its definition by calling it features that are inescapably human. This boils down, for me, to one word: fallibility. To be human is to err. When people go online, they bring this condition and fallibility with them. My first observation, hence, is that when I read a comment I don't agree with, or even offends me, I try to remember that no one on the planet is perfect (though some may argue this!). I have no idea what went through the person's mind as they typed whatever has left a bitter taste in my mouth. I have no idea what may, or may not, have just occurred in their life. Maybe their dog just died, or some other unusual event has transpired, and one way for them to express their sadness, grief, or anger, is to lash out on the Internet. My second observation is that the Internet is one of the safest places to "act out."

The Web is normally anonymous, and therefore people may act without fear of retribution or repercussion. Unfortunately, this leads to people doing just that, every single day. It has given birth to a new term for people who's online lives are defined by negative acts – what are known as "trolls." As defined by Wikipedia, trolls are people who post "inflammatory, extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community." Trolls take from an otherwise positive, productive, and/or civil interaction, give nothing back in terms of direct contribution, but do their best to produce negativity and malice. It seems clear to me these are attempts to project their own emotional or mental state on other people. Happy folks don't want to bring down those around them; miserable people often do. We don't need psych degrees to see this. It's important for me to remember these things, and remember that trolls seek attention and anger, because when I don't, I'm likely to be provoked, to react in a negative way, which only makes things worse. By engaging an online troll, I have given power to them, because by responding, I'm admitting they have an effect on me. And that's exactly what they want. Misery loves company, and so do trolls.

In effect, I have been, and continue to just state the obvious. If I'm happy, and satisfied with life, I behave that way in the real world, and on the web. If I'm irritable, and looking for a fight, the Internet is a great place for that as I don't run the chance of getting punched in the face. And I would argue that for many people (I'm talking computer geeks), the Internet is the ONLY place they feel the safety to act out. A geek at a frat party would probably keep his mouth shut (I'm not going to get into analysis of masochism here), no matter how angry or sad he is. But on an internet discussion forum, there is no physical reality, and we are on a level playing field, for better or for worse.

So, to sum up: courtesy on the web is entirely about one's own personal state inside. It's impossible for me not to reflect mine. And when I see things that bother me, I ask myself, "What don't I like about this? And why?" It always ends up being a reflection on me. It's easier to just try to remember that the person on the other side is in the same boat of humanity, with their own problems, and that it has nothing to do with me unless I decide to make it so. I've heard resentment is like taking poison yourself and expecting the other to die. Responding to a troll reminds me of that, as negativity inside me is like poison, and it has no real effect on the troll who I allowed to place it there. Therefore, I recommend combatting the Internet troll with love, and tolerance, and compassion. That's not what they want to hear or read.

If this article were posted on a discussion forum, I would close with, "let the trolling begin!" Here, I prefer, "have a fantastic day, and may you find the material (if you're a collector), or buyers (if you're a dealer or auction house), you're looking for!"

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> REGAMEY, Felix (1844-1906). Unique drawing showing Verlaine and Rimbaud in London, September 1872. €70,000 to 100,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> LABORDE, Alexandre de (1773-1842). <i>Voyage pittoresque et historique de l’Espagne.</i> Paris : 1806-1820. €20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> BOCCACE, Jean (1313-1375). <i>Il Decamerone…</i> Venise : Gabriele Giolito di Ferrari, 1542.<br>€ 12,000 to 15,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> LAMBERT, Yvon (1936). Full collection of writings from <i>Une rêverie émanée de mes loisirs.</i> Paris : 1992 - 2018. €50,000 to 70,000
    <b>Christie’s, Nov 3 :</b> JOUVE, Paul (1878-1973) -- KIPLING, Rudyard (1865-1936). <i>La Chasse de Kaa.</i> Paris : Javal & Bourdeaux, 1930. €2,000 to 3,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Book of Hours with Illuminated Miniatures, France, mid-15th century. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Conradus de Alemania [Halberstadt the Elder], <i>Concordantiae Bibliorum,</i> Strassburg, 1474. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Christopher Marlowe, <i>The Jew of Malta,</i> London, 1633. Earliest extant edition of this antiauthoritarian Elizabethan play. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b><br>Sir Isaac Newton, <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy,</i> first edition in English, 2 volumes, London, 1729. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> John Rae, <i>Narrative of an Expedition to the Shores of the Arctic Sea in 1846 and 1847,</i> first edition, London, 1850. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Philip Pittman, <i>The Present State of the European Settlements on the Mississippi…,</i> first edition, London, 1770. $10,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Cyanotype of an anatomy class at Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1895. $300 to $400.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 27:</b> Equine veterinary formulary, manuscript on paper, East Earl, Pennsylvania, circa 1860. $400 to $600.
  • <b><center>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Rare & Remarkable Autographs<br>and Manuscripts<br>Now until October 21, 2020</b>
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Most Remarkable Autograph Album Ever Offered: Wilde Poem, Melville Quotes Shakespeare, 8 presidents, Mary Lincoln & 400 More. $30,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Unique Napoleon Autograph Manuscript Detailing his Military Campaign in Italy, plus Doodles. $18,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Remarkable Pasteur Manuscript on Rabies Research 8 Months before 1st Successful Human Vaccination. $12,500 to $15,000.
    <b><center>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Rare & Remarkable Autographs<br>and Manuscripts<br>Now until October 21, 2020</b>
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Freud 1933 ALS Supporting First Lay Analyst Theodor Reik with Reik’s Handwritten Definition of Psychology. $15,000 to $16,000.
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Begin & Sadat Unique Signed Photo from Camp David Summit. $2,000 to $2,500.
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Rare Scriabin ALS Written the Year He Completed “The Poem of Ecstasy.” $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b><center>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Rare & Remarkable Autographs<br>and Manuscripts<br>Now until October 21, 2020</b>
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Columbus’ Patron Pays for a Gift to a Lady in Waiting. $2,000 to $2,500.
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Rare Signed Photo of Nansen, Nobel Prize Winner & Norway’s First Great Arctic Explorer. $1,000 to $1,200.
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Stravinsky Pens 5 Bars from "Petrouschka.” $1,200 to $1,500.
    <b>Lion Heart Autographs<br>Now thru Oct. 21:</b> Zapata Letter Written 4 Days Following Collapse of Negotiations between Villa and Carranza. $2,000 to $2,200.
  • <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> MACHIAVELLI, Niccolò. <i>Nicholas Machiavel's Prince. Also, The life of Castruccio Castracani of Lucca…</i> Translated by Edward Dacres. London, 1640. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> FILSON, John. <i>The Discovery, Settlement and present State of Kentucke: and An Essay towards the Topography, and Natural History of that important Country…</i> Wilmington, Del.: James Adams, 1784. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> ELUARD, Paul. <i>Un poeme dans chaque livre.</i> Paris: Louis Broder, 1956. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> LEWIS, James Otto. [<i>Aboriginal Port Folio.</i> Philadelphia: Published by the Author, 1835-1836]. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> [ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS]. BOOK OF HOURS, use of Rome, in Latin. [Southern Netherlands (Ghent or Bruges), c.1460]. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> MORE, Thomas, Sir. <i>The Workes ... wrytten by him in the Englysh tongue.</i> Edited by William Rastell. London, 1557. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. MORRIS, William. <i>Love is Enough.</i> Hammersmith: The Kelmscott Press, 1897. $5,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph endorsement signed as President (“A. Lincoln”), 24 February 1863. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> WASHINGTON, George. Address panel with autograph free frank signed ("G:o Washington"), as Commander in Chief of the Continental Army, 5 August 1777. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts<br>November 12-13, 2020</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> GOREY, Edward. <i>The Beastly Baby.</i> N.p.: The Fantod Press, 1962. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> FROST, Robert. Photographic reproduction signed and inscribed ("Robert Frost”), to R.V. Thornton, 1955. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 12-13:</b> GOREY, Edward. <i>The Bug Book.</i> New York: Looking Glass Library, 1959. $500 to $700.

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