• <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
    <center><b>California International Antiquarian Book Fair<br>February 10-12, 2023<br>Pasadena Convention Center<br> abaa.org/cabookfair
  • <b><center>Swann Auction Galleries<br>View Our Record Breaking Results</b>
    <b>Swann:</b> Gideon Welles, <i>Extensive archive of personal and family papers of Lincoln’s Secretary of the Navy,</i> 1791-1914. Sold September 29 — $281,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> Charles Addams, <i>Rock Climbers,</i> cartoon for <i>The New Yorker,</i> watercolor, ink and gouache, 1954. Sold December 15 — $37,500.
    <b>Swann:</b> Charlotte Brontë, <i>Jane Eyre. An Autobiography. Edited by Currer Bell,</i> three volumes, first edition, 1847. Sold June 16, 2022 — $23,750.
    <b>Swann:</b> Geoffrey Chaucer, <i>The Workes of Geffray Chaucer Newlye Printed,</i> London, 1542. Sold October 13 — $106,250.
    <b><center>Swann Auction Galleries<br>View Our Record Breaking Results</b>
    <b>Swann:</b> Dorothea Lange, <i>Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California (Destitute pea pickers in California. Mother of seven children. Age 32),</i> silver print, 1936. Sold October 20 — $305,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> George Washington, Autograph Document Signed, with two manuscript plat maps in holograph, 1751. Sold October 27 — $37,500.
    <b>Swann:</b> Winfred Rembert, <i>Winfred Rembert and Class of 1959,</i> dye on carved & tooled leather, 1999. Sold October 6 — $233,000.
    <b>Swann:</b> M.C. Escher, <i>Relativity,</i> lithograph, 1953. Sold November 3 — $81,250.
  • <b><center>Sotheby’s<br>Original Film Posters<br>27 January - 10 February 2023</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Vertigo (1958), poster, US. The ultimate poster on this classic Hitchcock title, one of three known examples. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Lawrence of Arabia (1962), roadshow poster, US. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Star Wars (1977), style C poster, printer's proof, US. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> The Navigator/ La Croisiere du Navigator (1924), re-release poster (1931), French. £5,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Jan. 27-Feb. 10:</b> Bullitt (1968), special test poster, US. £3,000 to £5,000.
  • <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 817. Bellin's complete five-volume maritime atlas with 581 maps & plates (1764). $24,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 325. An early and important map of the Republic of Texas (1837). $11,000 to $14,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 45. De Bry's early map of North Pole depicting Willem Barentsz' expedition (1601). $3,500 to $4,250.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 154. Poignant map of the United States documenting lynchings (1931). $250 to $325.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 457. Extremely rare matching set of pro-German propaganda from WWI (1914). $2,000 to $2,400.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 815. Homann's world atlas featuring 110 maps in contemporary color (1751). $14,000 to $16,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 60. Miniature pocket globe based on Herman Moll (1785). $3,500 to $4,500.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 8. Visscher's rare carte-a-figures world map (1652). $14,000 to $16,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 158. Matching satirical maps of the US by McCandlish: "Ration Map" & "Bootlegger's Map" (1944). $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 820. One of the finest English atlases of the early 19th century (1808). $4,750 to $6,000.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 59. Important milestone in preparation for 1969 moon landing (1963). $750 to $900.
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 8):</b> Lot 805. Superb bible leaf with image of crucifixion of Jesus with gilt highlights (1518). $800 to $950.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - May - 2012 Issue

Tragic End to the Life of Shakespearean Book Thief

Scottrios

Raymond Scott and his Cuban girlfriend Heidi Rios.

It was a tragedy worthy of Shakespeare... along with a comedy of errors. The life of perhaps the most entertaining of book thieves came to a sad conclusion in March. When the jokes came to an end, and the reality of a surprisingly long prison sentence set in, Raymond Scott took his own life. Scott provided his native England with a year full of humor as he awaited trial for theft of a Shakespeare First Folio. It was a truly entertaining performance, worthy of the man whose book he purloined. Unfortunately, what lay behind his celebrity was theft, common theft except for the million dollar price tag on the item he stole. When the performance ended, and Scott was left with the isolation and bleakness of his punishment, it proved to be more than he could endure. Scott was not an evil man, just someone who needed to be born with a fortune. Unfortunately, like most of us, he missed out on having rich parents, so he attempted to make up for it in the wrong way.

Raymond Scott was born on February 12, 1957. His father was an electrical engineer, while his mother tended to the house. His father, Raymond Sr., was not a rich man, but made a good living, and saved his money. Raymond Jr. was not much like his father. He possessed little of the work and save ethic that made his father reasonably successful in life. In fact, he never really held down much of a job in his 55 years of life. He preferred the life of the landed gentry, even if his ship never landed.

His father's savings enabled Raymond to get by without seriously working. Over the years, he supplemented his income with petty thefts and shoplifting. At times they were as petty as a bottle of wine or a smoke detector. Big time criminal he was not. When his father died in 2004, he inherited some money which enabled him to afford a few more luxuries. He purchased a Ferrari, and was noted for appreciating fine liquor. Raymond also was able to supplement his income with a caregiver's allowance, a small sum paid regularly to people who take care of an elderly person. Raymond took care of his mother.

In December of 1998, a copy of the Shakespeare First Folio disappeared from the Durham University Library. The university was about 10 miles down the road from Scott's home. It does not appear that Scott's name ever came up in relation to its disappearance. Why would it? Scott was at best a petty thief, while the Durham First Folio, though certainly not a perfect copy, was still something like a million dollar-item. This was way beyond Scott's level.

Indeed, we may never know whether Scott actually stole the book himself. Even after he went to prison, he remained vague as to how he came in possession of the book, though his original explanation was clearly a fabrication. In fact, he was never convicted of stealing the First Folio. His conviction was for possession of stolen goods. One suspects he took advantage of lax security at the Durham Library and put the book away in some hidden space, hoping that in time, everyone would forget that the book had been stolen. There are many lesser books for which this might be the case, but not a First Folio. No one is going to buy one of those for anything approaching its value without some careful research into its past. Stolen First Folios may go missing, but they are never forgotten.

Despite an inheritance, caregiver's allowance, and the reduction in expenses that comes with living at home with Mom, Scott was still not able to cover his financial needs. He took to doing what the rest of us who are not criminals do – running up credit card debt. He reportedly owed something like $100,000 this way. Meanwhile, he took on the persona of an international playboy. He traveled to Cuba, where foreign currency is welcomed, and met a young lady who danced in a nightclub. She was roughly 30 years his junior, and quite an attractive lady. Scott, to no one's surprise, was smitten. He succeeded in securing the interest of someone out of his league, though he did so by false pretenses.

Scott's Cuban girlfriend believed he was an independently wealthy playboy. Unfortunately, credit card companies will only let you run up debt for so long. Scott needed some real cash, and it was probably this realization that led him to pull down that First Folio, now missing a decade, from his shelf. He must have believed enough time had elapsed to safely move his treasure along. He was, of course, wrong.

One afternoon in 2008, Raymond Scott, a completely unknown person in the book world, or on any stage beyond the petty offenses section of his local police department, walked into the Folger Library in Washington D.C. The Folger is noted for having the largest collection of Shakespeare First Folios anywhere on Earth – by far. It holds around a third of the 232 copies known to still exist. He said he was seeking authentication of his copy. Of course, Scott would have known his copy was authentic. He knew from where it had come. What he undoubtedly was really looking for was a buyer. A lot of financial problems can quickly disappear if you have a First Folio to sell.

What Scott may not have realized is that the Folger's experts would do more than just authenticate his copy. They would also check to see if it matched up with anything in the stolen book databases. That was where it had been noted that the Durham copy had been stolen, and their expert compared Scott's copy for attributes of the missing Durham copy. Voila! A match. But not a match made in heaven for Raymond Scott. This was no match like the one he found with Cuban dancer Heidy Rios.

Scott had a story concocted to explain his possession of the valuable book. He claimed it was entrusted to him by a friend of Ms. Rios. It had been sitting in Cuba for generations. The family knew it was valuable, but Cuba being a Communist country and all, they couldn't get it out. So, they gave it to this “wealthy” British playboy who would be able to sneak it out of the country for them. No one was convinced. It perfectly matched the Durham copy, which had only been missing for ten years, not generations. In a few places, tell-take markings had been removed, including a page. Nevertheless, there were plenty of unique attributes to clearly identify that this copy had not come from the friend of a Cuban girlfriend thousands of miles away, but from a university library just ten miles down the road from Scott's home.

When he returned to England, Scott was arrested, and plans for a trial began. This involved several pretrial court appearances, and this is where Scott really became a celebrity. For once in his life, Scott was going to inhabit the public stage like an international playboy. He arrived in court in various flamboyant costumes. One time, evidently in deference to his Cuban explanation, he arrived in a stretch Humvee. He was dressed in a military outfit, evidently patterned on Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara, though it is not known whether Guevara carried a couple of champagne bottles in his hand like Scott. More likely, Guevara would have shared Scott's love for a good cigar. On another occasion, Scott arrived in a horse-drawn carriage, a lovely “assistant” by his side. He was dressed in a kilt. He must have been reveling in his Scottish heritage.

When not dressed in period costume, Scott would arrive in expensive clothing, sometimes with huge fur collars, and designer sunglasses. He would regale and entertain the press with his humor, all the while maintaining his innocence. It appeared he lived a charmed life, at least for as long as he could put off the day of judgment. However, there comes a day of reckoning, and Scott's came in August of 2010. Neither judge nor jury were buying Scott's fanciful tale of Cuban intrigue. They looked at the identifying markers in the First Folio, and undoubtedly Scott's close proximity to Durham University, and came down with the only decision a reasonable jury could reach. Scott was found guilty.


Posted On: 2020-09-20 15:20
User Name: brianr

Nothing tragic about Scott's death, I went to school with him. He was was a nutcase who contributed nothing to society.


Posted On: 2022-10-26 12:02
User Name: raymondscott

As a graduate of English literature who specializes in Shakespearean literature I daily handle several editions of Shakespeare's First Folio
and I know exactly which edition is the most authorative in terms of editorial theory and the closest we have or are likely to have to any
final published text authorized by the author, in the sense that it is the published text authorized on the author's death by his friends
and closest colleagues, such as John Heminges and Henry Condell, prominent members of William Shakespeare's company who performed his plays.
The First Folio of Shakespeare's Plays or Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies by William Shakespeare was published in 1623 in London.
For readers that are not familiar with the First Folio, the First Folio is the very first published collection of Shakespeare's plays.
It was compiled by John Heminges and Henry Condell who were William Shakespeare's friends and colleagues during his lifetime.
It is believed that 750 copies of the First Folio were published back in 1623 and there are only 235 copies known to exist today.
The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. owns 82 of them and their books are all in far worse condition than this edition.
As a professional expert I own and use many prestigious editions daily. While I enjoy them all, I am particularly fond of this volume.
If you want an edition that has the look and feel of the original 17th century First Folio your best choice is ISBN 9789464437539 of
which I recently acquired this hardcover and that is now the pride of my bookshelf showing to relatives, friends and visitors of my home.
It is first and foremost a paragon of scholarship, though I admit that it is perhaps of limited interest to many in some of its aspects.
Dealing with the many variants found in the various editions of the First Folio, it might seem rather medieval in some respects.
Simply put, it is a First Folio that was made up of the best pages of all First Folios available and not just at the Folger Library.
The book is large, maybe somewhat unwieldy, and the style is unusual to read by today's standards, but on the whole it is a work of art.
This edition is the closest you'll ever get to owning your own First Folio, perhaps the Best Folio that will ever be available.
I enjoy reading and owning fine books. This volume is definitely as finely made as a First Folio of Shakespeare is likely to get.
It is beautifully bound in a fine, contemporary gilted binding and the book in its entirety is a pleasure to own and use.
For those readers who care for such things, this very impressive book will soon become the pride of any bookshelf.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b><center>University Archives<br>Rare Manuscripts, Books & Sports Memorabilia<br>February 1, 2023</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Thomas Paine ALS Confirming Christmas Eve Attack Likely Based on Anti-Christianity, “The account you heard of a man firing into my house is true.” $24,000 to $35,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> George Washington Gives a Horse and Guns to His Loyal Guard 10 Days Before Resigning as Commander-in-Chief. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> John Hancock ALS, “General Howe is bent on coming here” - Troops, Martha Washington, & 1777 Continental Congress, to Wife Dolly! $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b><center>University Archives<br>Rare Manuscripts, Books & Sports Memorabilia<br>February 1, 2023</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Abraham Lincoln Boldly and Fully Signs Appointment of Consul Who Would Facilitate Bond Sales in Europe Financing Civil War. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> The Rarest of Dual Signed Kennedy Items! 1963 Christmas Card with "Blessed Christmas" Removed at the Last Minute for Kennedy's Jewish Friends. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> George Gershwin Signed Contract for 1st Production of <i>Porgy and Bess,</i> Also Signed by Dubose Heyward & Ira Gershwin, Historic! $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b><center>University Archives<br>Rare Manuscripts, Books & Sports Memorabilia<br>February 1, 2023</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Einstein Signed, “Two years after the fall of the German Goyim” 1st Ed. of <i>Mein Weltbild.</i> $12,000 to $14,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Walt Disney <i>Fantasia</i>-Era Boldly Signed TLS Re: "Special Effects Department," PSA Certified Authentic & With Phil Sears COA. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> 1996-97 Michael Jordan Chicago Bulls Home Game-Worn Jersey Showcasing "Light" Evident Use, MEARS A5. $6,000 to $7,000.
    <b><center>University Archives<br>Rare Manuscripts, Books & Sports Memorabilia<br>February 1, 2023</b>
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Wayne Gretzky’s 1994 All-Star Used Game Jersey, Inscribed to Former MLB Player! $4,500 to $5,500.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> <i>The Astronauts</i> Signed by All 7 Mercury Astronauts! $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b>University Archives, Feb. 1:</b> Fabulous Edison, Firestone, Burroughs Signed Journal With 44 Original Photos, Very Rare. $4,000 to $5,000.
  • <b>Il Ponte, Jan. 31:</b> BLAEU, Joannes and Martinus MARTINI - <i>Theatrum orbis terrarum, sive Novus Atlas. Pars sexta. Novus Altas Sinensis.</i> Amsterdam: Blaeu, 1655. €8.000 to €12.000.
    <b>Il Ponte, Jan. 31:</b> ORTELIUS, Abraham - <i>Theatrum orbis terrarum.. Nomenclator ptolemaicus.</i> Antwerp: Christopher Plantin, 1579. €10.000 to €15.000.
    <b>Il Ponte, Jan. 31:</b> PIRANESI, Giovanni Battista - <i>Carceri d'invenzione.</i> [Rome: G.B. Piranesi, second half of the 18th century]. €20.000 to €30.000.
  • <center><b>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts,<br>including Americana<br>February 16, 2023</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. CHAUCER, Geoffrey. <i>The Works…now newly imprinted.</i> Edited by F.S. Ellis. Hammersmith: Kelmscott Press, 1896. $100,000 to $125,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> [EINSTEIN, Albert (1879–1955)]. –– ORLIK, Emil (1870–1932), artist. Lithograph signed (“Albert Einstein”). N.p., 1928. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> TOLKIEN, John Ronald Reuel. <i>[The Lord of the Rings trilogy:] The Fellowship of the Ring.</i> 1954. –– <i>The Two Towers.</i> 1954. –– <i>The Return of the King.</i> 1955. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> CLEMENS, Samuel Langhorne ("Mark Twain") and Charles Dudley WARNER. <i>The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today.</i> Hartford and Chicago, 1873. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Feb. 16:</b> LOVECRAFT, Howard Phillips. <i>Beyond the Wall of Sleep.</i> Collected by August Derleth and Donald Wandrei. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1943. $2,000 to $3,000.
  • <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> [Black Sun Press] Proust, Marcel, 47 Unpublished Letters from Marcel Proust to Walter Berry, Paris: The Black Sun Press, 1930. $400 to $600.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Williams, William Carlos (1883-1963), <i>Spring and All,</i> first edition, Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. $400 to $600.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Washington, George (1732-1799), Autograph Letter Signed. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Poe, Edgar Allan (1809-1849), Autograph Letter Signed. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Thoreau, Henry David (1817-1862), Autograph Manuscript. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> [Paris Commnue], Photograph album. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Fleming, Ian (1908-1964), <i>Casino Royale,</i> first edition, London: Jonathan Cape, 1953. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Audubon, John James and the Rev. John Bachman, <i>The Quadrupeds of North America,</i> New York: V.G. Audubon, 1849, 1851, 1854. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Lewis, C.S. (1898-1963), <i>The Voyage of the Dawn Treader,</i> first edition, London: Geoffrey Bles Ltd, 1952. $600 to $800.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> [Bhagavad Gita] Wilkins, Charles, trans., <i>The Bhagvat-Geeta, or Dialogues of Kreeshna and Arjoon…,</i> first edition, London: Printed for C. Nourse, 1785. $700 to $1,000.
    <b>Bonhams Skinner, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2:</b> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, <i>Faust: Eine Tragodie von Goethe,</i> Hammersmith: Printed by T.J. Cobden-Sanderson & Emery Walker at the Doves Press, 1906-1910. $800 to $1,200.

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