Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2012 Issue

Another Hugely Successful Comic Book Sale

The first appearance of Batman took in over half a million dollars.

When our mothers threw out our old comic book collections years ago, we all breathed a sigh of resignation, and moved on. It was not until many years later that we really began to wonder if she did the right thing. Comic books began to show up as collectibles, bringing in prices worthy of investing in a few decades of storage in the attic. In short order, those triple digit prices began climbing to six digits. The wonder turned to astonishment. In the past few years, we have seen comic books pass the $1 million mark (usually for a first appearance of Superman), and last year one even surpassed $2 million. It may be baffling, but the time has come to move past bewilderment to understanding.

In late February, Heritage Auctions held a comic book sale. Most of the top items came from the collection of Billy Wright, an obscure collector who began buying comics as a child in the late 1930s and kept them for the rest of his life. Wright died in 1994. Somehow, he managed to hide them from his mother (actually, it appears that Wright's mother was one of those people who saved everything he owned, perhaps the sentimentality explained by Wright being an only child). Wright had no children and never talked about his collection. His grand-nephew discovered it years later while cleaning up the basement. Even then, it took a while before he realized the value of what he had uncovered.

Nothing in Billy Wright's collection broke the old record price for a comic book, not even close. At just over half a million dollars, the top item was less than one-fourth the all-time record. No, what made this auction special was the total volume of dollars bid. Almost $8.8 million was taken in during the auction. This really says more than does a couple of obsessed collectors chasing a first appearance of Superman. What this auction showed is the depth of comic book collecting. It takes more than a few very wealthy, intense aficionados to pull this off. It requires a substantial base of dedicated collectors. Comic book collecting has come of age.

The numbers, really, are quite astounding. How often is there a sale of regular books that takes in $8.8 million? What printed books can bring in $2,161,000, as did a copy of Superman last year? Other than an Audubon elephant folio, or a Shakespeare first folio (or a Gutenberg if one ever appears for sale again), not many. This is even more remarkable considering comic books were printed in large quantities (often hundreds of thousands if not more), they are relatively recent, come with no dust jackets, expensive bindings or anything better than cheap paper, and the expensive copies aren't even signed or inscribed. They are just comic books that could be bought for a dime six or seven decades ago. How many printed books with such attributes sell for the prices we are seeing for comic books today?

The explanation surely resides with their familiarity to the current crop of collectors, often from, or close to, the baby boom generation. This is what they grew up with. These are the “books” they purchased when young, read in their rooms at night, collected on their shelves (until Mom threw them out). Comics are a part of their lives. Some people collect others' lives, but increasingly, we collect our own lives, especially our childhood. While I have no statistical evidence to support this, I'm going to go out on a limb and say more of us read Superman than Proust when we were young. I'm not saying this is a good or a bad thing. It just is. Consequently, if we are very wealthy, we shell out $2 million for Superman, but something less for Marcel.

At the top of the Heritage auction was Detective Comics #27 from 1939. This one featured the first appearance of Superman's top competitor over the years for preeminent superhero status – Batman. Batman added a bit of strangeness to the typical, all-American type of superhero represented by Superman. As a result, he fit more easily into the darker images that made him the bigger draw at the box office in recent years. Bruce Wayne does better at the theater, though Clark Kent is still the top draw in comic books. This first of Batman took in $522,813, well beyond its estimate of $200,000.

Rare Book Monthly

  • Gonnelli:
    Auction 50
    Books, Autographs & Manuscripts
    March 6th-7th 2024
    Gonnelli: Cramer, [Picasso, Chagall , Miró], Trente ans d'activité. Starting price 4800€
    Gonnelli: Futurism
    Gonnelli: Avienus, Opera. 1488. Starting price 1200€
    Gonnelli: Vimont, Relation de ce qui s'est passé en la Nouvelle France, en l'année 1642. Starting price 5000€
    Gonnelli: Goedart, Metamorphosis et historia naturalis insectorum. 1662.
    Gonnelli: Il Petrarcha con la spositione di M. Giovanni Andrea Gesualdo.
    Gonnelli: Poblacion, De usu astrolabi compendium.
  • Toronto Book Auctions
    ART-PHOTO-SIGNED-BOOKS-MILITARY(NON)FICTION
    March 6, 2024
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: [ART BOOK MONOGRAPH] DAVID BURLIUK WITH ORIGINAL DRAWING and Signed twice. David Burliuk Rare ACA Gallery exhibition catalogue, undated. CA$400 – 800
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: [ART BOOK MONOGRAPH] KAWS: COMPANIONSHIP IN THE AGE OF LONELINESS. Text by Margaret Atwood. National Gallery of Victoria, Australia, 2019. $CA400 - 800
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: [ART BOOK MONOGRAPH] LAWRENCE WEINER: POSTERS. Nova Scotia College of Art, Canada,1987. CA$800 – 1,200
    Toronto Book Auctions
    ART-PHOTO-SIGNED-BOOKS-MILITARY(NON)FICTION
    March 6, 2024
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: WILBUR SMITH: THE DARK OF THE SUN. Heinemann, UK, 1965. Signed First edition. CA$800 – 1,200
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: ROBERTSON DAVIES: LEAVEN OF MALICE. SIGNED Clark, Irwin, & Co., Canada. 1954. 1st edition. CA$400 – 600
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: [THE NOTABLE TRAILS LIBRARY]. 8 VOLUMES SOLD TOGETHER. INCLUDING: THE TRIAL OF DR. X; ROE V. WADE; THE GALILEO AFFAIR; THE TRIAL OF BERNHARD GOETZ… CA$300 – 500
    Toronto Book Auctions
    ART-PHOTO-SIGNED-BOOKS-MILITARY(NON)FICTION
    March 6, 2024
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: [MILITARY FICTION]. 8 VOLUMES SOLD TOGETHER. INCLUDING: Canada's Royal Military College. REVIEW, THE STONE FRIGATE, A HISTORY OF THE RMC… CA$300 – 400
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: [WW1] CANADIAN (C.S.E.F.) SIBERIA 1918-1919 PHOTO ALBUM. With approximately 303 original official war photographs, postcards, and personal photographs. CA$8,000 – 10,000.
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: HANS BELLMER: THE DOLL. 1995, 1st Ed. CA$150 – 300.
    Toronto Book Auctions
    ART-PHOTO-SIGNED-BOOKS-MILITARY(NON)FICTION
    March 6, 2024
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: FAN HO; HONG KONG YESTERDAY. ModernBooks edition, 2006. First edition. 4to. CA$300 – 600.
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: TARYN SIMON: AN AMERICAN INDEX OF THE HIDDEN AND UNFAMILIAR. Hatje Cantz, Germany, 2012. Third edition. CA$600 – 1,000.
    Toronto Book Auctions, Mar. 6: BARBARA KRUGER PICTURE/READINGS. [Self-Published], 1978 First edition. CA$800 – 1,200.
  • Sotheby’s
    Modern First Editions
    Available for Immediate Purchase
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: Winston Churchill. The Second World War. Set of First-Edition Volumes. 6,000 USD
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: A.A. Milne, Ernest H. Shepard. A Collection of The Pooh Books. Set of First-Editions. 18,600 USD
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: Salvador Dalí, Lewis Carroll. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Finely Bound and Signed Limited Edition. 15,000 USD
    Sotheby’s
    Modern First Editions
    Available for Immediate Purchase
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: Ian Fleming. Live and Let Die. First Edition. 9,500 USD
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: J.K. Rowling. Harry Potter Series. Finely Bound First Printing Set of Complete Series. 5,650 USD
    Sotheby’s, Available Now: Ernest Hemingway. A Farewell to Arms. First Edition, First Printing. 4,200 USD

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions