Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2011 Issue

Amazon and California Reach Surprising Compromise on Sales Tax

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Gov. Jerry Brown signs Amazon compromise legislation.

A long-running contentious and caustic battle over sales taxes between online retailer Amazon.com and the state of California came to a quick and unexpected resolution last month. Among those lined up against Amazon, the world's largest bookseller, in this epic struggle was the American Booksellers Association, a trade organization of independent, bricks and mortar bookstores. Considering the vehemence with which Amazon had fought a requirement that they collect sales taxes, it is surprising how suddenly they backed down, in return for a one-year delay.

California, like many states, has long sought to require out-of-state internet and catalogue retailers to collect sales taxes on sales made to customers within their state. However, a decades-old Supreme Court decision has prevented the imposition of a tax-collecting requirement on out-of-state retailers unless that retailer has some sort of “nexus” with the state. “Nexus” has generally been thought of as a physical presence within the state, such as a store, office or warehouse. While chain stores, such as Wal-Mart and Target, have to collect sales taxes even on their internet sales because they have physical stores in most if not all states, internet-only retailers like Amazon do not. As long as they avoid placing warehouses and the like in a state, they do not have to collect the local sales tax.

This has long been a major bone of contention for two parties – the states, who lose enormous amounts of tax money, and local retailers, who believe they are at a competitive disadvantage since they must collect sales tax. The issue has simmered below the surface for decades, but recent state and local budget crises around the nation have led states to aggressively pursue this lost revenue. Technically, local residents are supposed to pay sales tax anyway. There are laws on the books in every state that require residents to self-assess and pay a “use tax,” an amount equivalent to the sales tax, when they purchase from an out-of-state retailer that does not collect their local tax. The reality is, however, that very few people ever pay this tax, something in the 1% range.

Earlier this year, California began to ramp up the pressure on Amazon. It passed a bill stating that local “affiliates,” people with websites that direct traffic to Amazon.com, would be considered agents of Amazon, thereby creating “nexus” with the state. Amazon cried foul and immediately severed its relations with its California affiliates. It then threatened to go over the head of the legislature and appeal directly to the voters, through a voter initiative, to repeal the legislation. Meanwhile, Amazon also held out a carrot to California. It promised to build several warehouses in the state and hire thousands of workers if California would lay off on the tax collecting requirement. This approach had worked earlier in Tennessee. California was not biting. California wants its sales tax revenue, and was determined to make life miserable for Amazon unless it complied.

And so, Amazon blinked. California is a huge market for Amazon, apparently far and away its largest. Amazon did not want to lose its affiliates. Perhaps even more importantly, Amazon wants to get physical with the state. The offer of warehouses and jobs was not merely a ploy to get out of collecting sales taxes. Local warehouses enable the company to significantly reduce shipping costs, and provide the quicker delivery service needed to compete with local stores for impatient customers. Amazon felt a need to be in California, and perhaps also thought it saw the writing on the wall in terms of its ability to forever avoid collecting sales taxes. So, for a one-year reprieve, Amazon agreed to begin collecting sales taxes in California in 2012. Additionally, it agreed to cancel its plan to place a referendum repealing the law on the ballot.

That reprieve may appear somewhat costly for California. It is estimated the state will lose $200 million in sales tax collections over the next year, with municipalities losing a similarly large sum. However, the reality is that without an agreement, Amazon was unlikely to collect the tax anyway, so California may not have lost anything, and faced still more lost revenue a year from now if the case dragged on.

Once California and Amazon reached an understanding, the state legislature repealed the legislation that set in place the expanded definition of “nexus” designed to ensnare Amazon. Governor Jerry Brown enthusiastically signed the bill. The Governor pronounced, “This landmark legislation not only levels the playing field between online retailers and California’s brick-and-mortar businesses, it will also create tens of thousands of jobs and inject hundreds of millions of dollars back into critical services like education and public safety in future years.” Anyone who has followed California's recent financial issues realizes the state sorely needs both.

Meanwhile, Amazon echoed its support for the compromise. In a written statement, Amazon Vice President of Global Policy Paul Misener stated, “This bipartisan, win-win legislation will allow Amazon to bring thousands of jobs and hundreds of millions of investment dollars to California, and welcome back to work tens of thousands of California-based advertising affiliates." It is anticipated Amazon will be welcoming back its California affiliates almost immediately.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Printed & Manuscript Americana<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Extensive archive of papers of Lincoln’s Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> George Catlin, <i>North American Indian Portfolio,</i> 1844. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> The Twenty-Four Books of the Holy Scriptures, Carefully Translated…after the Best Jewish Authorities, Philadelphia, 1853-54. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Printed & Manuscript Americana<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Wedding book of Eleanor Roosevelt’s bodyguard, Earl Miller, signed by the Roosevelts, 1932. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Textile titled <i>The Resignation of Pres’t Washington,</i> Scotland, circa 1800. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Gideon Welles, Pass for President Lincoln’s White House funeral, 1865. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Confirmation of arms and nobility in favor of the Diez y Mora family, Madrid, 1710. $2,500 to $3,500.
  • <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> JOYCE, James. <i>Ulysses.</i> London: John Lane the Bodley Head, 1937. PRESENTATION COPY OF THE FIRST ENGLISH EDITION PRINTED IN ENGLAND. $50,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [SHACKLETON, Ernest]. –– BROWNING, Robert. <i>Poetical Works of…</i> London: Smith and Elder, 1906. PRESENTED TO SHACKLETON AND THE OFFICERS OF THE NIMROD BY A MEMBER OF THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> AUDUBON, John James. <i>The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> New York: George R. Lockwood, [1870]. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> ARISTOTLE. Opera, in Greek, parts one and two only: Organon and Natural Philosophy I. Edited by Aldus and others. Venice: Aldus Manutius, 1 November 1495–February 1498. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> COOK, James, Capt. [Collected Voyages]. First and Second Voyages: London: W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, 1773, 1777; Third Voyage: London: H. Hughes for G. Nicol and T. Cadell, 1785. $14,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> CLEMENS, Samuel Langhorne (“Mark Twain”). <i>The Writings of…</i> Hartford: American Publishing Co., 1899–1900. $12,000 to $16,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. SHAKESPEARE, William. <i>The Poems of…</i> Edited by Frederick S. Ellis. Hammersmith: William Morris for the Kelmscott Press, 1893. $12,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> LONDON, Jack. <i>The Call of the Wild.</i> New York: The Macmillan Company, 1905. PRESENTATION COPY INSCRIBED BY LONDON. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> CROWLEY, Aleister (1875–1947). <i>The Winged Beetle.</i> London: privately printed, 1910. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> WILDE, Oscar (“C.3.3.”). <i>The Ballad of Reading Gaol.</i> London: Leonard Smithers, January 1898. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> DRYDEN, John. <i>Fables Ancient and Modern; translated into verse from Homer, Ovid, Boccace, & Chaucer: with original poems.</i> London: John Tonson, 1700. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [MAP]. LINSCHOTEN, Jan Huygen van. <i>Delineatio Orarum Maritimarum…</i> London: John Wolfe, 1598. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <b><center>Sotheby’s<br>Antiquarian Books<br>Including a series of views of Milan<br>September 27 to October 4</b></center>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Livius, Historia Romanae decades, Venice, Vindelinus de Spira, 1470, contemporary Morocco. €30,000 to €40,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Blaeu, Nieuw Stedeboeck van Italien (Piemont), The Hague, 1724-1725, 8 volumes, marbled calf gilt. €70,000 to €90,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Baysio, Rosarium decretorum, Venice, 1481, later vellum. €10,000 to €15,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> [Niccolò da Poggibonsi], Viaggio da Venetia al santo Sepulchro, Venice, 1529, later half calf. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Hieronymus, Epistole [Italian], Ferrara, 1497, blue crushed morocco with the Rocco di Torrepadula arms. €12,000 to €15,000.

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