Rare Book Monthly

Articles - September - 2011 Issue

It's Been a Tough Month for Large Book Retailers

Bordersbye

Borders bids its final farewell.

This has not been a good month for large, chain bookstores, especially so for their investors. Physical retailing has been battling online selling for a decade, and physical books have been battling electronic ones for the past two years. Neither has fared well. Both will survive for many years to come, but will continue to lose market share to their electronic counterparts. It makes for a difficult business, and tough investment.

 

A little over a month ago, the number one bricks and mortar book retailer, Barnes and Noble, its stock long in the doldrums, received some good news. Liberty Media, noted for buying up troubled companies, made an offer of $17 per share. Now this may not seem exciting for a company whose share price reached $45 five years ago, but it had spent most of the year under $15, and briefly hit an all-time low under $10. However, Liberty was less interested in its stores than its Nook electronic reader, a surprising success after belatedly entering the market way after Amazon's Kindle. Kindle remains by far the leader, but the Nook has become a solid number two, garnering around a quarter of the market and growing.

 

However, it appears that Liberty and Barnes and Noble could not agree on the value of the Nook, so Liberty withdrew its takeover bid and instead purchased $204 million worth of B&N preferred stock. It pays a hefty 7.75% dividend and can be converted into a 16.6% share of the company. This provides the company with welcome cash, but the dividend rate it must pay is high, and a conversion of the preferred stock to common will result in shareholder dilution. The investment may be good for the company, but not so good for shareholders. The stock price quickly dropped to $10, and recently was trading for $11. That $17 offer doesn't look so bad now.

 

For the number two physical retailer of books, there is really no more to say. In February, Borders filed for bankruptcy protection, and in July announced that no buyer for the chain could be found. Instead, it would close all of its stores and liquidate its assets. That liquidation should be completed by the end of this month, bringing a final end to Borders' 40-year career. You may find some bargains in the next few days at your local Borders store as discounts are large, but what is likely to be left now are the dregs. You can also find Borders stock at a cheap price. It has ranged between 2 and 4 cents a share the past few weeks. At its peak it cost $37. Don't waste your money. It isn't worth 2 cents. Eventually, it will settle at zero.

 

The third largest bricks and mortar book retailer in America, soon to be number two, is attempting to pick up some sales from the Borders bankruptcy. Books-A-Million, the southern-based bookstore chain, attempted to purchase the leases, fixtures, and inventory of 30 defunct Borders locations. The two could not reach a deal, but Books-A-Million will be taking over the leases of 14 closing Borders locations. BAM (as Books-A-Million is also known) is looking to expand its footprint north. Stores in Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Ohio are reportedly among those sought to be taken over.

 

While Books-A-Million has been swimming against the tide by actually expanding its physical presence, it still has not been an easy time for the growing chain. The firm recently reported a $2.9 million loss for the second quarter, compared to a $1.9 million gain for the same quarter in the previous year. Its recent stock price, below $2.50, is approaching historic lows. That's about one-quarter of its price of 20 years ago, not a great long-term investment. The troubling results showed an 11.4% decline in overall revenue and a 12.9% decline in sales at same stores year over year. CEO Clyde Anderson stated, "A soft publishing lineup, the effect of e-book migration and the impact of Border's liquidation all contributed to the decline in comparable-store sales."

 

However, there remains one positive book investment story - Amazon.com. The largest online bookseller, and leader in the electronic book field, continues to trade around the $200 per share level, near its record high price reached earlier this year. Indeed, if you bought Borders stock for $37 in 1998, you could have purchased Amazon for half that price. Now Amazon stock is worth $200 and Borders 2 cents. The challenge for investors today is to figure out which companies are the next Amazon, and which are the next… Borders.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €

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