Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2011 Issue

Books and Libraries:  The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renoreview

Special Collections would be axed at UN-Reno under Provost's proposal.

These are apocalyptic times in the book and library world as we know them. The year 2000 may not have been the beginning of end of the world for humanity, but for the book and library world, in hindsight, maybe. Two major events have come together to turn this world upside down. One is the development of the electronic reader, which has quickly evolved from another trendy device to the eventual heir to the printed book. The other is the devastating recession, the worst since the Great Depression of the 1930s, and the way we have chosen to respond to hard times. Buried within the inevitable change in how we read, and the role libraries will play in the future, is the question of what becomes of our old and rare books, and the great collections built over the years.

 

I think we can safely say the battle between electronic readers and printed books is over. Printed books will not disappear, at least not in our lifetime, but electronic editions will become the predominant form. Coming generations will read on a screen, not paper. That leaves the question of what becomes of all of those millions of old, pre-electronic era books out there, their texts gradually being retrofitted into digital impulses, but physically still held in collections in their original form. Here we look to the newswires, and see some news, both positive and disheartening.

 

Johns Hopkins University is adding a $30 million extension to its main library, called the Brody Learning Commons. According to the Johns Hopkins Newsletter, it is designed to be a "student-friendly space," as compared to the "bunker-feeling" of the main library. It has been carefully designed to provide wireless connectivity throughout with "no dead spots." There will be a café to facilitate social interaction, "integrating learning and coffee." Who needs Starbucks? "Indeed, it will truly be a 21st century library," the article states.

 

Oh, one more thing. The BLC will not have books. They are not being eliminated from Johns Hopkins, as the old library will still have stacks of them. It's just the place where students will want to go that won't have books. However, there is one exception, and this will enable those who cherish rare and antiquarian books to take heart - "Other than the rare books, the BLC will not have stacks for any other books." Recent and common books, as well as textbooks, may not be found in this human-friendly new library building, but a place is being set aside for a rare book room. We believe that this is the way it should be in this new age of digital reading. We need to preserve a part of our past, as that is who we are, so we can enable future generations to understand and participate in our history. It is important for coming generations to understand where we have been as they plot the course to where we will go. This is a good choice Johns Hopkins has made.

 

Some less encouraging news comes out of the University of Nevada in Reno. Here, budgetary constraints may lead to perhaps shortsighted short-range solutions. A brief notice on the home page of the university's special collections explains, "As many people have heard, Special Collections is one of the units on campus that would be closed as part of the Provost's proposal to reduce expenses to cover the university's budget shortfall of $59 million." According to their website, Special Collections houses 20,000 books, 200,000 photographs, manuscripts, architectural plans, and historical maps. The major areas of focus are Nevada and the Great Basin, the book arts, and rare books in general.

 

In justifying this cut, the Provost's proposal states that while preservation of material has been a historic function of libraries, and serves "an important public service function," it is "less directly connected to the University's broader instructional and research emphases than other discrete parts of the University Libraries." Specifically, the proposal states:

 

"The department and its specific collections would remain dormant into the foreseeable future.

 

Retrieval of materials housed in the Department would be made on an as-needed basis by other library staff.

 

Digitization projects reporting through Special Collections would cease.

 

Additions to the dormant collections in the form of purchased acquisitions would cease; gifts would be discouraged or redirected, as appropriate, to the State Historical Society."

 

Naturally, some library employees will be losing their jobs too. Obviously, any bookseller hoping to offer material to the University will have to wait a long, long time, perhaps forever. When a library says it will discourage even gifts, purchases are but a dream. There is nothing in the notice threatening to sell off their collection, but maintaining one of this size is not inexpensive. One can only wonder whether library-as-albatross eventually becomes library-as-source-of-revenue as unwillingness to adequately fund it drags on.

 

Once upon a time, we suffered through a Great Depression. Despite the enormous financial difficulties, we still managed to fund a Federal Writers' Project and other programs to keep our writing and art alive. A decade later the greatest peacetime expansion America has ever seen began, our arts and culture still intact. Such a commitment through even moderately hard times no longer appears to be so clear. What this bodes for our future is unknown.

 

 

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ian Fleming, <i>Goldfinger,</i> first edition, inscribed to Sir Henry Cotton, MBE, London, 1959. Sold for $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Joseph Brant, Mohawk Chief, ALS, writing after pledging support to King George III against American rebels, 1776. Sold for a record $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Sonia Delaunay, <i>Ses Peintures</i> . . ., 20 pochoir plates, Paris, 1925. Sold for a record $13,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Diana, Princess of Wales, 6 autograph letters signed to British <i>Vogue</i> editor, 1989-92. Sold for $10,400.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Alexander Hamilton, ALS, as Secretary of the Treasury covering costs of the new U.S. Mint, 1793. Sold for $12,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Benjamin Graham & David L. Dodd, <i>Security Analysis,</i> first edition, inscribed by Graham to a Wall Street trader, NY, 1934. Sold for $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> George Barbier & François-Louis Schmied, <i>Personnages de Comédie,</i> Paris, 1922. Sold for $9,375.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Ilsée, Princesse de Tripoli,</i> Paris, 1897. Sold for a record $13,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ralph Waldo Emerson, <i>The Dial,</i> first edition of the reconstituted issue, Emerson’s copy with inscriptions, Cincinnati, 1860. Sold for a record $3,250.
  • <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Darwin, Charles. <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> Presentation Copy. Sold for $500,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Darwin, Charles. Autograph Letter Signed, 3 pp, negotiating the 2nd American edition with Appleton. Sold for $21,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph Letter Signed, 8 pp, Paris, 1924, to his father discussing Bullfighting, Stories, and his new baby. Sold for $25,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Shakespeare, William. <i>Corialanus.</i> London, 1623. 1st printing [Extracted from the First Folio]. Sold for $50,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Swift, Jonathan. <i>Gulliver's Travels.</i> London, 1726. 1st edition, Teerink's A edition, fine, large copy. Sold for $21,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Fitzroy, Robert. Autograph Letter Signed to agent Thomas Stilwell, informing him of the progress of H.M.S. Beagle. Sold for $17,575.
    <center><b>Bonhams<br> Property from the Collection of Nicole and William R. Keck II</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Shakespeare, William. <i>Sonnets.</i> 1901. 2 volumes. Printed on vellum and illuminated by Ross Turner, bound by Trautz-Bauzonnet. Sold for $13,825.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Beardsley, Aubrey. <i>The Birth, Life, and Acts of King Arthur.</i> 1893-94. 2 volumes. Contemporary painted vellum gilt by Chivers. Sold for $5,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Assisi, St. Francis. <i>The Canticle of Brother Sun.</i> Illuminated on vellum, for the Grolier Society. Sold for $7,575.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Rackham, Arthur. <i>Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens.</i> 1/500 copies signed by Rackham. Sold for $4,825.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Proust, Marcel. <i>Du coté de chez Swann.</i> 1st edition, 1st issue. Inscribed by Proust. Sold for $8,825.
  • <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini. June 27</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KENNEDY ONASSIS, JACQUELINE Typed letter signed to Oleg Cassini. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> [CASSINI-KENNEDY FASHIONS] Important archives related to the development of fashions for Mrs. Kennedy… $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> [CASSINI-KENNEDY FASHIONS] Detailed ledger of the Kennedy White House years… $500 to $800
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KELLY, GRACE. Four autograph letters to Oleg Cassini. $5,000 to $8,000
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini. June 27</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> CASSINI, OLEG. Group of Kennedy-era original fashion sketches. $1,000 to $1,500
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KENNEDY ONASSIS, JACQUELINE. Autograph letter signed to Oleg Cassini. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> CASSINI, OLEG. Fashion sketch titled “Mrs. Kennedy-Palais de Versailles-State Dinner.” $800 to $1,200
    Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini: [CASSINI, OLEG - KENNEDY, JACQUELINE.] Group of approximately 130 original fashion designs… $800 to $1,200.
  • <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Blaise Cendrars and Fernand Léger, <i>La Fin du monde filmée par l’ange N.-D.,</i> Paris, Editions de la Sirène, 1919
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> André Breton, <i>Second manifeste du Surréalisme,</i> Paris, Editions Kra, 1930
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Paul Eluard and Pablo Picasso, <i>La Barre d’appui,</i> Paris, Editions « Cahiers d’Art », 1936
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Blaise Cendrars and Fernand Léger, <i>La Fin du monde filmée par l’ange N.-D.,</i> Paris, Editions de la Sirène, 1919
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Hans Bellmer, <i>Die Puppe,</i> Paris, G.L.M., 1936
    <b>Christie’s Paris:</b> Salvador Dali, <i>La femme visible,</i> Paris, Editions Surréalistes, 1930
  • <b>Christie’s London, Jul. 9:</b> Pushkin, Alexander. <i>Evgenii Onegin. A novel in verse.</i> A first edition of the most important work in Russian literature in its original parts, 1825–32. £120,000 to £160,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Jul. 9:</b> Gogol, Nikolai. <i>Evenings on a Farm near Dikanka.</i> A rare first edition of Gogol's first masterpiece, 1831–32. £70,000 to £100,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Jul. 9:</b> Darwin, Charles Robert. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection.</i> First edition, owned and read by two contemporaries of Darwin. London: John Murray, 1859. £140,000 to £200,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Jul. 9:</b> Galilei, Galileo. <i>Sidereus Nuncius.</i> First edition, announcing the first astronomical discoveries made with the telescope. Venice: Tommaso Baglioni, [March] 1610. £300,000 to £500,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Jul. 9:</b> The seal of Wulfric. England, first half 11th century. £70,000 to £100,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Jul. 9:</b> Bible, <i>Ezechiel</i> in Latin. [Northern Italy, 5th century]. £120,000 to £180,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Jul. 9:</b> Blaeu, Jan and Willem Blaeu. <i>Grooten Atlas [Atlas Major]</i>. Amsterdam: Johannes Blaeu, 1664. £450,000 to £650,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Jul. 9:</b> Petites Heures of Charles VIII use of Paris, in Latin. An exquisite Hours illuminated by the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse. [Paris, 1490s]. £300,000 to £500,000

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