Rare Book Monthly

Articles - January - 2011 Issue

Google Opens eBook Store; Alibris an Early Partner

Googleebooks

Google now offers millions of books from its electronic-book store.

Internet search giant Google recently announced the opening of their highly anticipated electronic-book store. Formed in the 1990s to offer internet searching, Google has grown into a widely diversified high tech company, offering a wide breadth of services. In 2003, Google entered the book field by announcing it would begin scanning millions of older books with partner libraries, which would then be made available to the public via their website. Online access is available to millions of older books in full, or more recent (under copyright) books in snippets. However, technology has moved far beyond 2003, and consumers now expect the most recent titles in complete, digital copies, and that they be available on small, portable devices. Amazon led the charge; Google has now answered the call.

 

On December 6, 2010, Google launched their eBook store, offering 3 million titles, including more recent titles for sale, and older, out of copyright books, for free. This may be ground previously trod by Amazon, but Google hopes to make it more convenient for consumers to use. Google's selection is around a million greater than Amazon's, though it is likely most of that million consists of older or less in-demand titles. Where Google mostly tries to compete with Amazon is on issues of convenience, though this gap is rapidly closing.

 

Amazon's strength, and perhaps in some sense its weakness, is its dedicated Kindle eBook reader. When Amazon first launched electronic-book selling, it did so with a dedicated reader and an Amazon store from which those books had to be purchased. It was a closed circle. Exclusivity is a double-edged sword. It can lock the competition out, or lock yourself away from customers using a different reader or bookstore. Google took a different tack in that it offers no electronic reader. You need to buy that from someone else, virtually anyone except Amazon. Kindles still need books sold by Amazon, but Amazon did quickly respond to the other half of the readers' choice issue. Amazon's ebooks no longer have to be read on Kindles; they can be read online or on other devices too.

 

This opening of Kindle books to other readers should help neutralize what would have been a major advantage for Google. When you buy a book from Google, it can be stored both on your reader and in the "cloud." The cloud means you can access your eBooks through the internet. So, if you leave your electronic reader at home, you can use a different, compatible device, or an online computer, and read your books from there. It will even remember in the "cloud" where you left off, so you can pick up at the right page from another device. It's kind of an electronic bookmark. However, Amazon is now making its Kindle software available for other brands of devices, so that Kindle reader/buyers can do the same. Still, books for your Kindle reader need to be purchased from Amazon. Those owning other devices need not purchase all of their books from Google.

 

Google has also expanded its market by opening its library of electronic books to other sellers. Independent booksellers can become Google partners and sell Google electronic books from their own websites. Google has already signed up Alibris, the second largest online seller of used books, to its partnership program. This should both help Google sell more books while enabling traditional booksellers, who could not possibly develop a large library of electronic texts to sell themselves, to enter the eBook market. This could be critical to the survival of smaller book retailers as they try to compete in a world where books are increasingly turning digital. For larger merchants, such as Alibris, it allows them to keep up with Amazon. Alibris' CEO Brian Elliott issued a statement explaining, "This partnership with Google highlights our commitment to providing Alibris buyers with the best book selection available."

 

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €

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