Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2010 Issue

Barnes & Noble Reaches Out to Children

Bntoys

Barnes & Nobles toy and game area at their Bronx, New York, store.


By Michael Stillman

Barnes & Noble recently announced another new idea for its stores as the nation's number one bricks and mortar book retailer struggles to re-establish relevance in a changing world, not to mention fending off a corporate takeover by dissident shareholders and fighting for survival itself. We don't know what the ultimate outcome will be for the retailer that struggles to keep its stock price at a third of its high of a few years ago, but we give them an "A" for effort. Barnes & Noble is not going down without a fight, and just as they reinvigorated bookselling in an earlier decade with coffee and pastry, they may yet do it again with socialization and learning.

Just a couple of months ago, Barnes & Noble announced that they would be setting up "e-reading boutiques," featuring its Nook electronic readers, in their stores. These would allow customers to become more familiar with electronic books and readers and, hopefully, encourage them to buy Nooks and e-books from them. We think it's a clever idea - taking advantage of the one thing Barnes & Noble has that bookselling and electronic leader Amazon lacks - a local, physical presence. Personal, hands-on use of and help with electronic devices is a powerful way to connect to customers. Now, Barnes & Noble is adding one more chance to connect, this time with children in particular.

Barnes & Noble is testing what it calls "ultimate playrooms" in five of its stores, two in Connecticut, two in New Jersey, one in New York. These are 3,000 square foot areas designed for play, interactive learning, and, naturally, reading. The idea is to engage children in activities that are both fun and intellectual. It's the bookstore equivalent to McDonald's Playland, perhaps a bit higher on the intellectual to physical ratio than the latter, but the same basic idea. Make the bookstore more fun for children, and you may make customers both of them and their parents. Not a bad idea, and one that online retailers like Amazon will be hard-pressed to follow.

These playrooms will feature products from partners such as Lego. There will also be book-related items such as products featuring Curious George and Thomas the Tank Engine. There will be games and toys, and, naturally enough, Nooks for the youngsters to try. While these large play areas are only being tested in five stores, many others will have smaller areas devoted to children's products.

Along with books, coffee, and electronic readers, Barnes & Noble will also be selling toys and games. Here we again see some clever marketing strategies by the leading physical bookstore. Rather than all kinds of toys, like a Wal-Mart or Toys R Us, Barnes & Noble will be sticking with educational-type toys. As Jaime Carey, Chief Merchandising Officer for Barnes & Noble, cleverly stated, "Busy parents and gift-givers don't have to wade through aisles of cheap, faddish toys; Barnes & Noble has already selected the best of the best, hand-picking and highlighting exceptional and engaging learning toys and games." So, if you are a parent looking for something to educate and stimulate your child, instead of momentarily impress them with something that breaks next week, Barnes & Noble is the place to go. That's a logical connection for a store that primarily sells another intellectual item - books. To us, this looks like some smart positioning by B&N, one that just may help to bring them back in a world very changed from their 1990s heyday, pre-Amazon, pre-electronic readers. If successful, the combination of fun and books may also stimulate more reading among the young. If so, this will not only be good for Barnes & Noble, but for society as well. Let's hope.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Francis Scott Key, <i>Star Spangled Banner,</i> first printing, c. 1814-16. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> William Sydney Porter, a.k.a. “O. Henry,” archive of drawings made to illustrate a lost mining memoir, c. 1883-84. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> [Bay Psalm Book], printed for Hezekiah Usher of Boston, Cambridge, c. 1648-65. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Noticia estraordinario,</i> probable first announcement in Mexico City of the fall of the Alamo, 1836. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Patrick Gass, first edition of earliest first-hand account of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, Pittsburgh, 1807. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Diploma from the Princeton Class of 1783, commencement attended by Washington & Continental Congress. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>Sprague Light Cavalry!</i> color-printed broadside, NY, 1863. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> <i>The Lincoln & Johnson Union Campaign Songster,</i> Philadelphia, 1864. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Lucy Parsons, labor organizer, albumen cabinet card, New York, 1886. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Daniel L.F. Swift, journal as third mate on a Pacific Whaling voyage, 1848-1850. $3,000 to $4,0000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 10:</b> Two photos of Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, silver prints, 1901. $1,500 to $2,500.
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €

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