• <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 10: Boone, Daniel. Autograph document signed. Est. $12,000-15,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 29: Darwin, Charles. Autograph letter signed. Est. $4,000-6,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 30: Davis, Jefferson. Civl War-date autograph letter signed. <BR>Est. $15,000-25,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 45: Einstein, Albert. Autograph letter signed. Est. $15,000-$25.000.
    <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 46: Einstein, Albert. A large archive.<br>Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 48: Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed. Est. $15,000-25,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 57: Fulton, Robert. Autograph letter signed. Est. $8,000-12,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 74: Jackson, Thomas J. ("Stonewall"). <br>Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 97: Lincoln, Abraham. A Proclamation, January 1863. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 99: [Slavery - Thirteenth Amendment]. Est. $80,000-120,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 116: Newton, Sir Isaac. Autograph document signed ("Is. Newton"). <br>Est. $30,000-$50,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 200: Ruth Babe. Photograph signed. <br>Est. $4,000-6,000.
  • <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Latest catalogue - The Russian Turmoil 1917-45: An Émigré perspective
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> S. Anichkova, Baroness Taube, [The Enigma of Lenin]. Prague, c. 1934.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> O. Kugusheva [Wolf Pack]. Berlin, 1940.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> B.M. Kuznetsov [To Please Stalin / 1945-1946]. Canada, 1968.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Iliazd, Picasso, Giacometti, etc. Poésie de mots inconnus. 1949. Bound by P.-L. Martin. Est: € 30,000-40,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Aristophane. Comoediae. 1608. Folio. Contemporary red morocco. De Thou’s copy. Est: € 6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Boccacio. Il Decamerone. 1757. Contemporary red morocco.<br>Est: € 4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Hore beatissime virginis. Kerver, 1522. 44 woodcuts, 10 of each illuminated. Est: € 20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June:</b> Molière. Œuvres 1666. Rare first collective edition. Bound by Chambolle-Duru. Est: € 12,000-18,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Borges. Cuaderno San Martín. First edition, with inscription and 2 autograph pieces. Est: € 6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> De Gaulle. Signed autograph letter. 1939, 12 p., about the WWII and Hitler. Est: € 20,000-25,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Bonnard. Daphnis et Chloé. 1902. On China paper, with suite in blue.<br>Est: € 25,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b><br>Dali. La Divine Comédie. One of 21 copies on Japan paper, with suite. Est: € 10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Miro & Hirtz. Il était une petit pie. 1928. One of 20 copies on Japan paper.<br>Est: € 15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Picasso & Level. Picasso. 1928. One of 120 first copies, with one lithograph on Japan paper.<br>Est: € 25,000-35,000
  • <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 52. Herman Melville. Autograph letter signed ,1858. est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 55.<br>Edgar Allan Poe. Oil on canvas portrait, est. $400-600
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 61. John Roberts. Account and Memoranda books of the Pennsylvania Quaker miller executed for treason during the American Revolution,<br>est. $6,000-8,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 106. Marc Chagall. <i>Le Plafond de l'Opera</i>, inscribed copy, est. $400-600
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 147. Manuscript Prayer Book in Latin and Dutch with Hand-colored woodcuts, c. 1500, est. $2,000-2,500
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 189. McKenney & Hall. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America</i>, 1837-38, est. $8,000-12,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 204. <br>Julio Plaza and Augusto do Campos. <i>Obetos Serigrafias Originais</i>, 1969,<br> est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 222. <i>Nuremberg Chronicle in</i> Latin, 1493, est. $25,000-35,000
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 234. <i>Third Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners of the Central Park</i>, 1860, est. $800-1,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 249. Theodor De Bry. Hand-colored illustrations of North American Indians, est. $2,000-2,500
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 254. <br>Pete Hawley. Original illustration<br>for Jantzenaire corsets, 1950s,<br>est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 264. <i>Burr's Atlas of the State of New York</i>, 1840, est. $7,000-9,000

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - November - 2009 Issue

Important Signed Documents from the Raab Collection

Jacksonindianplea

Andrew Jackson's appeal to the Indians to leave their ancestral homelands.


Item 21 is a very important, recently discovered item of American history. It is a letter previously known only in draft form from President Andrew Jackson concerning the removal of America's southern Indians to lands west of the Mississippi. It is an early attempt by Jackson to cajole the Indians into moving voluntarily. Jackson plays the role of benevolent father, trying to preserve their way of life and save them from white settlers. As we now know, when Jackson was unable to cajole them into leaving, he was quite willing to use force to remove them from their homelands. This letter is dated October 15, 1829. It is written to Major David Halley, who was his representative to the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations. In it Jackson explains the message he wants relayed to these tribes. Jackson instructs Haley, "say to them as friends and brothers to listen [to] the voice of their father, & friend. Where [they] now are, they and my white children are too near each other to live in harmony & peace." However, Jackson continues, he has provided land for them on the other side of the Mississippi upon which whites have no claim, "and they & their children can live upon [it as] long as grass grows or water runs, in peace and plenty. It shall be theirs forever." Continuing in a paternalistic tone, Jackson instructs, "Say to my red Choctaw children, and my Chickasaw children to listen." He explains that if they remain, they will be subject to the laws of the states of Mississippi and Alabama, not the laws of their own nation. He next claims that he is powerless to stop the states from exercising this control, "...that so far from the United States having a right to question the authority of any State to regulate its affairs within its own limits, they will be obliged to sustain the exercise of this right." As Raab notes, this is a most interesting claim from Jackson, as the Indians were granted this land for their own nations by federal treaty, and Jackson would have no problem enforcing federal authority over the internal affairs of a state a few years later during the Nullification Crisis. However, Jackson repeatedly proclaims to be the Indians' friend and father, playing the role of someone who wants to preserve their nations, but won't be able to protect them unless they cooperate by agreeing to move. As we know, when most refused to move voluntarily, they were forced to do so, and the lands promised to be "theirs forever" would similarly be taken away only a few decades later. $90,000.

It is unusual to see someone run for president as a nonpartisan, even more unusual for such a person to actually mean it. Zachary Taylor was such a candidate, and in 1848, that approach had enough public appeal to get him elected. The Whigs were facing a difficult election in 1848, having opposed the recently concluded and popular Mexican War, and their most likely candidate, Henry Clay, had already lost a couple of times before. So they turned to Taylor, a non-politician who, as a general and hero of the Mexican War, could neutralize objections to their opposition to the war. Taylor agreed to run, but made it clear he would not be beholden to any Whig doctrines, only to his own beliefs. On March 26, 1848, when his name was being bandied about as a potential Whig candidate, Taylor wrote a letter to Dr. John Kearsley Mitchell of Philadelphia. Writes Taylor, "If honored by election to the Presidency I will strive to execute with fidelity the trust reposed in me, uncommitted to the principles of either party." Taylor lived up to that pledge, unwilling to follow anyone's party line or compromise his way to consensus. However, he died only a little over a year in office, and unlike Taylor, his successors attempted to compromise their way out of the North-South, slave/free issue, only to aggravate the problem beyond repair. Item 22. $7,200

You may reach The Raab Collection at 800-977-8333. Their website is www.raabcollection.com.

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