• <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 10: Boone, Daniel. Autograph document signed. Est. $12,000-15,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 29: Darwin, Charles. Autograph letter signed. Est. $4,000-6,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 30: Davis, Jefferson. Civl War-date autograph letter signed. <BR>Est. $15,000-25,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 45: Einstein, Albert. Autograph letter signed. Est. $15,000-$25.000.
    <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 46: Einstein, Albert. A large archive.<br>Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 48: Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed. Est. $15,000-25,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 57: Fulton, Robert. Autograph letter signed. Est. $8,000-12,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 74: Jackson, Thomas J. ("Stonewall"). <br>Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 97: Lincoln, Abraham. A Proclamation, January 1863. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 99: [Slavery - Thirteenth Amendment]. Est. $80,000-120,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 116: Newton, Sir Isaac. Autograph document signed ("Is. Newton"). <br>Est. $30,000-$50,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 200: Ruth Babe. Photograph signed. <br>Est. $4,000-6,000.
  • <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 52. Herman Melville. Autograph letter signed ,1858. est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 55.<br>Edgar Allan Poe. Oil on canvas portrait, est. $400-600
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 61. John Roberts. Account and Memoranda books of the Pennsylvania Quaker miller executed for treason during the American Revolution,<br>est. $6,000-8,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 106. Marc Chagall. <i>Le Plafond de l'Opera</i>, inscribed copy, est. $400-600
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 147. Manuscript Prayer Book in Latin and Dutch with Hand-colored woodcuts, c. 1500, est. $2,000-2,500
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 189. McKenney & Hall. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America</i>, 1837-38, est. $8,000-12,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 204. <br>Julio Plaza and Augusto do Campos. <i>Obetos Serigrafias Originais</i>, 1969,<br> est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 222. <i>Nuremberg Chronicle in</i> Latin, 1493, est. $25,000-35,000
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 234. <i>Third Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners of the Central Park</i>, 1860, est. $800-1,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 249. Theodor De Bry. Hand-colored illustrations of North American Indians, est. $2,000-2,500
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 254. <br>Pete Hawley. Original illustration<br>for Jantzenaire corsets, 1950s,<br>est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 264. <i>Burr's Atlas of the State of New York</i>, 1840, est. $7,000-9,000
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Jason Master, Haarlem, c. 1475-80
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Biblia Latina, Paris, 1476-77, first edition of the Vulgate printed in France
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Ludolph of Saxony, Vie du Christ, illuminated by the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse, 1506-08
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>King David, miniature on vellum, Bologna, c. 1470
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible, illuminated in the <i>primo stile</i>, Bologna, c. 1250-70
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Catalogue 160: Magnificent Books, Manuscripts, & Photographs
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Shakespeare's First Folio (1623)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Charles Darwin family photograph album
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Spectacular album of mammoth photos of the American West by Watkins & others
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Washington family copy of The Federalist (1788)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Underground Railroad runaway broadside (1857)

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - April - 2008 Issue

Historic American Autographs from Joe Rubinfine

Rubinfine161

Historic autographs from Joe Rubinfine.


By Michael Stillman

Joe Rubinfine
has issued a new catalogue of American Historical Autographs. It includes the most famous of American names, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, along with numerous other figures from politics, the military, science and invention, business, and law. They range from simple signatures to detailed letters of historical importance. Here are a few of the 51 items available in List 161.

Item 43 is a significant letter from Theodore Roosevelt to friend and political reformer Louisa Lee Schuyler dated February 20, 1912. At the time, Roosevelt was considering a run against his successor and former ally President William Howard Taft. Schuyler was against such a course, but Roosevelt had become very disillusioned with Taft and already had decided to accept the Republican nomination if offered. Speaking of Taft, Roosevelt says, "He is a reactionary, not primarily by preference, but simply because he does not understand the great questions that are up, and has no real conviction on them. He was an admirable lieutenant, but as a general he is utterly incompetent." Roosevelt goes on to say Taft would "make the Republican Party a reactionary party," and in the ultimate comment of disrespect, "not a particle more useful to the country than the Whig Party under Millard Fillmore." Roosevelt was not nominated by the Republicans, ran as a third party candidate, and both he and Taft lost to Democrat Woodrow Wilson. Priced at $17,500.

Item 29 is a pair of letters which describe one of the greatest unnecessary tragedies of early American history, the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr which cost Hamilton his life. They are from Hamilton's friend and successor as Secretary of the Treasury Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to his wife. One is dated July 11, 1804, the day of the duel, while Hamilton still lived, the other July 13, after Hamilton died. Wolcott obviously despised dueling, and notes with irony that Hamilton did as well, despite succumbing to Burr's challenge. Wolcott notes that Hamilton believed "the custom was in the highest degree criminal, yet there were peculiar reasons which rendered it proper for him..." Wolcott continues, "This instance of the derangement of intellect of a great mind, on a simple point, has often been noticed as one of the most common yet unaccountable frailties of human nature." In this first letter, Wolcott also notes that Hamilton is unlikely to survive, that he did not attempt to shoot Burr, and that while his wife is now with him, she was "ignorant of the cause of his Illness" (that seems hard to believe). In his second letter, Wolcott again rails against dueling, marveling on how Hamilton calmly arranged his affairs in advance in case of a bad outcome, "Thus proving his respect for justice in comparatively small matters, & at the same time disregarding its obligations on points of the first importance." Hamilton's actions are all the more incomprehensible to Wolcott because the former deemed dueling "immoral & indefensible," and had earlier lost his own son to a duel. $40,000.

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