• <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Jacques-Émile Ruhlmann, wallpaper sample book, circa 1919. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Archive from a late office of the Breuer & Smith architectural team, New York, 1960-70s. $3,500 to $5,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> William Morris, <i>The Story of the Glittering Plain or the Land of Living Men,</i> illustrated by Walter Crane, Kelmscott Press, Hammersmith, 1894. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Gustave Doré, <i>La Sainte Bible selon la Vulgate,</i> Tours, 1866. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Gustav Klimt & Max Eisler, <i>Eine Nachlese,</i> complete set, Vienna, 1931. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>Eric Allatini & Gerda Wegener, <i>Sur Talons Rouges,</i> with original watercolor by Wegener, Paris, 1929. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>C.P. Cavafy, <i>Fourteen Poems,</i> illustrated & signed by David Hockney, London, 1966. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Jean Midolle, <i>Spécimen des Écritures Modernes...</i>, Strasbourg, 1834-35. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>E.A. Seguy, <i>Floréal: Dessins & Coloris Nouveaux,</i> Paris, 1925. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> BEETHOVEN, LUDWIG VAN. Autograph Manuscript sketch-leaf part of the score of the Scottish Songs, "Sunset" Op. 108 no 2. [Vienna, February 1818]. Inscribed by Alexander Wheelock Thayer. SOLD for $131,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> Violin belonging to Albert Einstein, presented to him by Oscar H. Steger, 1933. SOLD for $516,500
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. Autograph Letter Signed ("Papa") to his son Hans Albert, discussing his involvement with the atomic bomb, September 2, 1945. SOLD for $106,250
    <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> HAMILTON, ALEXANDER. Autograph Letter Signed, to Baron von Steuben, with extensive notes of Von Steuben's aide Benjamin Walker, June 12, 1780. SOLD for $16,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in Latin, being detailed instructions on making the philosopher's stone. 8 pp. 1790s. SOLD for $275,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> 1869 Inauguration Bible of President Ulysses S. Grant. SOLD for $118,750
  • <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers:<br>Rare & Collectors’ Sale. May 2, 2018</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> Extremely Fine Copy of Fantasy Classic. Tolkien (J.R.R.) <i>The Hobbit, or There and Back Again,</i> L. (George Allen & Unwin Ltd. Museum Street) 1937. €20,000 to €30,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> Incunabula. [Sirectus, Antonius] O’Fihely (Maurice)Abp. <i>Formalitates de Mente Doctoris Subtilis Scoti Nec Non Stephai Burlifer cum novis additionibus…</i> Venice 14th December 1051 (ie. 1501). €3,000 to €4,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> Original Book Illustrations by Pamela Leonard. Illustrations: Regan (Peter) Touchstone, 8vo D. (Mount Salas Press) 1989. €3,500 to €4,500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers:<br>Rare & Collectors’ Sale. May 2, 2018</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> [Petit (Jean), Prevel (Jean) & Gregory (Pope)] [Gregorius]. <i>Compendium Textuale Compillationis decretalium Gregorri noni sine qua…</i>, Paris [Dec. 1524]. €350 to €500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> Excessively Rare – V. Fine Copy. [Mac Mahon]. <i>Jus Primatiale Armacanum, In Omnes Archiepiscopos, Episcopos, et Universum Clerum</i>… [n.p.] 1728. €750 to €1,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> Madden (R.R.). <i>Travels in Turkey, Egypt, Nubia and Palestine in 1824, 1825, 1826 and 1827,</i> 2 vols. 1822. €500 to €700
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers:<br>Rare & Collectors’ Sale. May 2, 2018</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> Early English Herbal. Gerarde (John). The Herball or General History of Plants, thick folio L. (John Norton) 1597. €700 to €1,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> The Tehran World War 2 Conference Photograph: [Tehran Conference 1943] An important and iconic Group Photograph showing Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin. €80 to €120
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> Natural History Specimens from Jersey Jersey Islands: Westacton [Mrs Acton] Collection of 53 original dried examples of Seaweed collected in Jersey, c. 1860. €300 to €400
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers:<br>Rare & Collectors’ Sale. May 2, 2018</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> Plyglot Bible: Hutteri (Eliae). <i>Biblia Sacra, Ebraice, Chaldaice, Graece, Latinae, Germanice, Sclavonice.</i> Lg. folio Nurimberg 1599. €250 to €350
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> The American Invasion 1888: “First Ever G.A.A. Hurling Match in America” Medal: G.A.A., The Invaders, 1888. €2,000 to €3,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy, May 2:</b> “Babe” Ruth and the G.A.A. G.A.A. & Baseball: A unique and early Sporting Association. An original Spalding B12 Baseball Bat. €4,000 to €6,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - August - 2016 Issue

The American Civil War from the George S. MacManus Co.

6966cf4d-470d-469d-bc29-4a1838472494

Books about the Civil War.

The George S. MacManus Company has released the latest installment of their current series on the Civil War: Catalogue 416 Civil War Part II. I suspect there will be many more to go, as this one covers the alphabet from BR to only CR. Nevertheless, they managed to come up with over 500 items in this narrow alphabetical range. Obviously, MacManus has a large collection of Civil War items, meaning just about every aspect of it, including obscure battles and regimental biographies, can be found. If you are looking for something about the Civil War, and if in particular you're trying find an author between Br and Cr, this is the place.

 

We begin with an account of the last days of the Civil War from a Confederate perspective. Rev. Giles Buckner Cooke was the last survivor of an era. He studied under Stonewall Jackson at Virginia Military Institute (reportedly he was a very mediocre student), joined the Confederate Army at the outbreak of the war, and then served on the staffs of several generals, including Benjamin Bragg, P. T. Beauregard, and finally, from 1864 until the war's end, Robert E. Lee. He was with Lee in the days leading up to the latter's surrender at Appomattox. After the War, Cooke settled into a long career as a minister, including operating schools and churches for blacks in the South. His pamphlet is entitled Just Before and After Lee Surrendered, published in 1922. By that time, Cooke was already the last surviving member of Lee's staff. He was not done yet, as this copy of his pamphlet contains a letter Cooke wrote in 1931, at the age of 92, to his "old friend" Mrs. Charles R. Hyde. He reminisces about her father, who likely served during the war. Even then Cooke was not finished, living to 98. Item 414. Priced at $750.

 

Next up is Sketches of the Rise, Progress, and Decline of Secession; with a Narrative of Personal Adventures among the Rebels, by William Gannaway Brownlow. This may sound like a post-war recounting of the rise and fall of the Confederacy, but it was published in 1862. Parson Brownlow was ahead of his time. He was a Methodist minister, newspaper publisher, and after the war, Tennessee Governor and Senator. Brownlow was never afraid to state his opinions, which were often radical and extreme, and to vitriolically attack those who disagreed with him. Some of his causes, and he had many, were righteous, others not so much. He attacked religions other than his own, Democrats and Republicans alike (he had been a Whig), drunkards (he was pro-temperance), abolitionists (he was pro-slavery), immigrants (he supported the Know-Nothings). Despite all this, he was a strong defender of the Union in border state Tennessee, so much so that he was jailed for awhile and forced into exile in the North during the war. He returned with a vengeance, his governorship so controversial that as recently as 1987, his portrait was banned from the Capitol in Nashville. Brownlow had been dead over a century by then. As a post-war governor, he became a Radical Republican, and despite his former support for slavery, believed freed blacks more deserving of civil rights than disloyal whites. He also aggressively fought the Ku Klux Klan during his terms as governor. His book, targeting the Confederacy, was prepared while in exile in the North, during which time he conducted a well-received speaking tour of many Union states. Item 57. $150.

 

Did you know that Abraham Lincoln was born in North Carolina, not Kentucky? Probably not, primarily because he wasn't. Tell that to James C. Coggins. Item 339 is a copy of his 1927 revised second edition of Abraham Lincoln: A North Carolinian with Proof. The accepted story is that Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks, was born in what is now West Virginia in 1784. She was likely illegitimate. Her mother, Lucy, lived with her siblings and parents (Abe's great-grandparents), but they all moved shortly after Nancy's birth to Kentucky. Lucy married Henry Sparrow in Kentucky, and Nancy later moved in with her mother, then with an uncle and aunt, and finally, she married Thomas Lincoln in 1806. Her son, Abraham Lincoln, was born in 1809. So they say. According to Coggins, based on stories handed down by old-timers in North Carolina, Nancy Hanks was actually raised in that state. She was also an illegitimate daughter in this story, but is raised with relatives in North Carolina, grows up, and is sent to work in the home of one Abraham Enloe. Enloe later moves away, but one day returns to the old homestead to visit tenants and then has his way with young Nancy. Mrs. Enloe is displeased to say the least, but Enloe feels responsible. He first gets his tenant to put up with Nancy and her baby. Gratefully, Nancy names her baby "Abraham" after his father, Abraham Enloe. Next, Enloe convinces his daughter and son-in-law to take Nancy and her baby to Kentucky. Finally, Enloe pays Thomas Lincoln to marry Nancy, whereupon Abraham Hanks, or Abraham Enloe, or Abraham Whatever, becomes Abraham Lincoln. Conspiracy theorists will love this book. $150.

 

Along with the famous, like Lincoln, this catalogue offers books about the obscure. Item 52 is A Colonel at Gettysburg and Spotsylvania, published in 1931. That colonel, who miraculously served in the Confederate Army through the entire Civil War and lived to tell about it, was Joseph Newton Brown of Anderson, South Carolina. During the 1850's, he worked for his father as a merchant, then trained for and became a lawyer in his hometown. However, at the beginning of the rebellion he signed up for the army. He was near Fort Sumter when the first shots were fired. Brown would wind his way through many battles, including Gettysburg, and was injured several times. He persevered. He was finally taken from the battlefield by Union troops on April 2, 1865, barely a week before the war ended, at the fall of Petersburg. He was released in July, returned to Anderson, and had a long and very successful career as a lawyer, mill operator, banker, and even served a term in the South Carolina legislature. Brown lived to the age of 88, dying in 1921. This biography of his war years was written by Brown's daughter, and his devotion to the Confederacy can be seen by the name he gave her – Varina Davis Brown, named after Jefferson Davis' wife. She was so named despite being born two years after the Civil War ended. $250.

 

Here is another Confederate soldier named Brown, even more obscure than the last. Philip E. Brown had come from the countryside to work as a hotel clerk in Richmond, then Petersburg, Virginia, when that state joined the rebellion. The next morning he volunteered. He recounts what happens next in his Reminiscences of the War 1861-1865, published in 1912. Now an elderly man, Brown recounts his time in service. His story is both ordinary and horrific. It was run-of-the-mill for what soldiers endured in that war. They were constantly on the move, exhausted, short on food, short of blankets. Then, they would face the enemy, bloody battles took place, and the fields were covered with the dead and wounded, the latter moaning in agony. It is a story repeated until finally it is Brown's turn to be wounded. Fortunately, his wound is in the arm. In retreat, he ends up reaching a group of Union soldiers, one of whom, remarkably, looks after him, brings food and water, and takes him to a Union surgeon. There, the surgeon treats him kindly while going through the arduous, and painful to Brown, task of removing a bullet embedded deeply in his arm. He is taken prisoner, sees more doctors who say his arm has to be amputated, but he evades them. Despite the pain in his swollen arm, he manages prison life well, and is fairly soon sent home in a prisoner exchange. The doctor at home questions why his arm was not amputated, and says it must be. Brown has to escape his own side's doctor this time, makes his way back to the hotel in Richmond where he had worked, finds a better doctor who can fix his arm, and lives out the remainder of the war as a hotel clerk once again. However, that does include the burning of Richmond and his hotel at the tail end of the war. Despite his trials, this Brown does not turn out to be an unreconstructed Confederate. He believes the Union has become better than ever and is glad to be part of it, his kind treatment by Union forces after being injured leaving a lasting impression. Item 47. $250.

 

The George S. MacManus Co. may be reached at 610-520-7273 or books@macmanus-rarebooks.com. Their website is www.macmanus-rarebooks.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> E.H. SHEPARD, Original drawing for A.A. Milne’s The House at Pooh Corner.<br>$40,000-60,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> BERNARD RATZER, Plan of the City of New York in North America, surveyed in the years 1766 & 1767. $80,000-100,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> THOMAS JEFFERSON, Autograph letter signed comparing Logan, Tecumseh, and Little Turtle to the Spartans. Monticello: 15 February 1821. $14,000-18,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN C. FREMONT, Narrative of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, in the Year 1842.. Abridged edition, the only one containing the folding map From the Sporting Library of Arnold “Jake” Johnson. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> ZANE GREY, Album containing 94 large format photographs of Grey and party at Catalina Island, Arizona, and fishing in the Pacific. From the Sporting Library of Arnold “Jake” Johnson. $5,000-$8,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> WILLIAM COMBE, A History of Madeira ... illustrative of the Costumes, Manners, and Occupations of the Inhabitants. produced by Ackermann in 1821; From the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> ERIC TAVERNER, Salmon Fishing... One of 275 copies signed by Taverner, published in 1931,From the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN WHITEHEAD, Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo. Whitehead reached the high point of Kinabalu in 1888. Part of a major group of travel books from the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN LONG, Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader, describing the Manners and Customs of the North American Indians... The first edition of 1791. $3,000-$5,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> SAMUEL BECKETT, Stirrings Still. This, Beckett’s last work of fiction with original lithographs by Le Brocquy, limited to 200 copies signed by the author and the artist. From the Estate of Howard Kaminsky.. $1,500-$2,500

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