• <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GUTENBERG BIBLE, MAINZ. Price realized: $5,390,000. Oct 1987, NY.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> LEONARDO DA VINCI, Codex Hammer. Price realized: $30,802,500. Nov 1994 NY
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE FORBES COLLECTION, Price realized: $40,900,000. Mar 2002, New York.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> ANDRE FRANQUIN, SPIROU ET FANTASIO. Price realized: €157,500. Apr 2014, Paris, France.
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GREAT HOURS OF GALEAZZO MARIA SFORZA. Price realized: £1,217,250. Jul 2011, London.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE ROTHSCHILD PRAYERBOOK. A Book of Hours, use of Rome, in Latin. Price realized: $13,605,000.
  • <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Bartolus, Super Prima Parte Infortiati (Venice, 1478). See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England (Philadelphia, 1771-73). First American edition. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book<br>Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Blackstone, The Great Charter (Oxford, 1759). First edition. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Boniface VIII, Liber Sextus Decretalium (Venice, 1491). In a remarkable binding. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Darrow, Autograph Letter, Signed (February 26, c.1930). See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Dugdale, Origines Juridiciales (London, 1671). Extra-illustrated on 138 leaves. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Gratian, Decretus Gratiani (Venice, 1514). With 130 woodcuts. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Gregory IX, Decretales (Nuremberg, 1482). Koberger imprint with exquisite initials. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Holmes, Flirtatious Autograph Letter, Signed (Boston, December 4, 1897). See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Jodocus, Vocabularius (Strasburg, 1500) [&] Formulare Registrorum (Leipzig, 1506). See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Story, Commentaries on the Constitution (Boston, 1833). First edition. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Catalogue 79 - March 2015. Recently Acquired Books, Manuscripts & Ephemera
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>St. Paul’s epistles, manuscript on vellum, illuminated by the Simon Master, c. 1150-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible Historiale, illuminated manuscript in French on paper, Amiens, c. 1480-85
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Miniature Book of Hours, illuminated by Simon Bening, Bruges, c. 1530-35
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Saintly Pope, miniature on vellum, by Pacino da Bonaguida, Florence, c. 1310-15
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Pliny, Historia naturalis, Treviso: Manzolus, 1479
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91
  • <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Latest catalogue: 50 Fine Books 2015
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> M. Catesby,<br>The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands (London, 1729-77).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility (London, 1811). First edition of the Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Koronatsionniy sbornik [Album of Nicholas II's coronation] (St. Petersburg, 1899): preferred deluxe version in Russian.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> A complete set of John Gould's magnificent bird books in attractive contemporary bindings (1831-88).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Andy Warhol, Bald Eagle from Endangered Species. Screenprint in colours, 1983, signed in pencil.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Sir Ernest Shackleton, South: The story of Shackleton’s last expedition 1914-1917 (London, 1919).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> J.J. Audubon, The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (NY, 1845-54): The largest successful colour plate book of 19th-century America.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Geoffrey Chaucer, The Works (Kelmscott Press, 1896). One of the finest illustrated books ever produced.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Lev Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (Moscow, 1879):<br>first edition in book form of the celebrated novel.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - February - 2014 Issue

Americana from Walkabout Books

249deb66-f777-44ba-a625-10902333aad8

Americana from Walkabout Books.

Walkabout Books of Laguna Niguel, California, has issued their second catalogue, appropriately enough titled Catalogue Two. Americana. Offered is a great selection of modestly priced items relating to America, mostly from the 19th or early 20th century. With a very few exceptions (over and under), items are available for three figures, generally lower three figures. Nevertheless, it is filled with fascinating pieces, including numerous selections relating to California locales, the Alaska Gold Rush, treatment of America's natives, slavery and abolition, and western travel. Many other American topics are also to be found. Here is a scattered sample of these works.

 

Who would ask a doctor for medical advice when you can turn to a cowboy instead? The answer is too many gullible Americans. Item 52 is a 48-page production from the “Cowboy Herbalist,” one Charlie White-Moon (real name Charles Bunce). You know the story – saved by Indians, Charlie lives with them and learns their secret remedies, which he now offers to dumb white people. Newspaper records indicate his cure, known as “Com-Cel-Sar,” was promoted during the teens, and this one fits in, dated 1912. The title is The Cow-Boy and Com-Cel-Sar. Charlie liked hyphens almost as much as he liked money. Presumably, “Com-Cel-Sar” is some sort of Indian word, though I find it in no dictionaries. This product combines roots and herbs to create a cleansing tonic that rids the body of “useless matter, undigested foods and the like.” Sounds like it probably had some mild laxative properties. However, it is dubious that it had much effect against disease. Priced at $75.

 

Wilson Lumpkin was a successful political figure in Georgia during the first half of the 19th century. Along with serving as a state representative, he earned terms in the U.S. House, the U.S. Senate, and two terms as Governor of Georgia, from 1831-1835. His positions undoubtedly made him a popular man at the time, but those who come across his name today will more likely look back at his career in disgust. He accomplished a number of things through the course of his life, but that for which he was most proud was his role in the forcible removal of the Cherokee and other Indians from their ancient homelands in Georgia. He sent them to far off Oklahoma, the horrific Trail of Tears. It is likely no other man played a greater role in this tragedy. He was an early advocate for Indian removal, a prime mover in passing such legislation, worked closely with Andrew Jackson in his shameful support of removal, ignored the U.S. Supreme Court ruling protecting the Indians' rights to their land, and after his term was over served on the commission to enforce the “treaty” signed by a small group of Cherokee consenting to removal, and guarded its final stages in the senate. Of course, he always claimed this was for the good of the Indians, as did Jackson, even as he held the lottery which gave away Indian land to white settlers. Item 29 is The Removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia, Including His Speeches in the United States Congress on the Indian Question... This is a two-volume set, one of 500 copies, compiled by Wymberley Jones DeRenne from Lumpkin's manuscript and published in 1907, several decades after the Governor died. $600.

 

Item 92 is Dissolution or Physical Death, and How Spirit Chemists Produce Materialization, by Michael Faraday. No, it isn't by Faraday. Poor Michael Faraday. He was one of the great scientists, a physicist and chemist who made numerous discoveries concerning electricity and magnetism. It is he who is responsible for the electric motor and generator. What Faraday was not was a spiritualist. Indeed, he was a most vocal opponent, and devised experiments to show how reputed visits from spirits at seances were false. So, after Faraday died in 1867, he became something of a target for spiritualists, who reported having visits from the deceased scientist. This is one such example, published in 1887. In it, the spirit of the departed Faraday supposedly comes back to tell us how we can live after our bodies have died. $100.

 

Item 22 is a rare early issue of San Francisco's first newspaper, and California's second. It is Vol. 1, No. 7 of The California Star, dated February 20, 1847. It tells news of what was then a lightly populated land of uncertain ownership. The U.S. military had seized it from Mexican control, and settlers from America had also participated, but the Mexican War was still ongoing at the time, and California had been Mexican territory. Nonetheless, the Americans were in control. The Star had its editorial viewpoint, critical of Governor Robert Stockton. It describes him as a “pompous, bloated, demagogue.” It is more favorably inclined toward his military rival, General Stephen Kearney. The paper includes numerous articles of local news, but perhaps the most intriguing item is a small classified advertisement. It was placed by John Sutter. It is a want ad for “two Thrashing Machines for wheat of a size and sufficient power for a crop of some 40,000 bushels.” Soon enough, Sutter would discover something far more interesting than wheat on his farm. Within a year, gold would be discovered near Sutter's Mill, and the California Gold Rush was on. $3,500.

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