• <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GUTENBERG BIBLE, MAINZ. Price realized: $5,390,000. Oct 1987, NY.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> LEONARDO DA VINCI, Codex Hammer. Price realized: $30,802,500. Nov 1994 NY
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE FORBES COLLECTION, Price realized: $40,900,000. Mar 2002, New York.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> ANDRE FRANQUIN, SPIROU ET FANTASIO. Price realized: €157,500. Apr 2014, Paris, France.
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GREAT HOURS OF GALEAZZO MARIA SFORZA. Price realized: £1,217,250. Jul 2011, London.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE ROTHSCHILD PRAYERBOOK. A Book of Hours, use of Rome, in Latin. Price realized: $13,605,000.
  • <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Bartolus, Super Prima Parte Infortiati (Venice, 1478). See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England (Philadelphia, 1771-73). First American edition. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book<br>Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Blackstone, The Great Charter (Oxford, 1759). First edition. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Boniface VIII, Liber Sextus Decretalium (Venice, 1491). In a remarkable binding. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Darrow, Autograph Letter, Signed (February 26, c.1930). See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Dugdale, Origines Juridiciales (London, 1671). Extra-illustrated on 138 leaves. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Gratian, Decretus Gratiani (Venice, 1514). With 130 woodcuts. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Gregory IX, Decretales (Nuremberg, 1482). Koberger imprint with exquisite initials. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Holmes, Flirtatious Autograph Letter, Signed (Boston, December 4, 1897). See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Jodocus, Vocabularius (Strasburg, 1500) [&] Formulare Registrorum (Leipzig, 1506). See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Story, Commentaries on the Constitution (Boston, 1833). First edition. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Catalogue 79 - March 2015. Recently Acquired Books, Manuscripts & Ephemera
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>St. Paul’s epistles, manuscript on vellum, illuminated by the Simon Master, c. 1150-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible Historiale, illuminated manuscript in French on paper, Amiens, c. 1480-85
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Miniature Book of Hours, illuminated by Simon Bening, Bruges, c. 1530-35
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Saintly Pope, miniature on vellum, by Pacino da Bonaguida, Florence, c. 1310-15
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Pliny, Historia naturalis, Treviso: Manzolus, 1479
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91
  • <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Latest catalogue: 50 Fine Books 2015
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> M. Catesby,<br>The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands (London, 1729-77).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility (London, 1811). First edition of the Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Koronatsionniy sbornik [Album of Nicholas II's coronation] (St. Petersburg, 1899): preferred deluxe version in Russian.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> A complete set of John Gould's magnificent bird books in attractive contemporary bindings (1831-88).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Andy Warhol, Bald Eagle from Endangered Species. Screenprint in colours, 1983, signed in pencil.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Sir Ernest Shackleton, South: The story of Shackleton’s last expedition 1914-1917 (London, 1919).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> J.J. Audubon, The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (NY, 1845-54): The largest successful colour plate book of 19th-century America.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Geoffrey Chaucer, The Works (Kelmscott Press, 1896). One of the finest illustrated books ever produced.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Lev Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (Moscow, 1879):<br>first edition in book form of the celebrated novel.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - December - 2012 Issue

Graphic Works of Social Movements from Lorne Bair Rare Books

Bair15

Political graphics from Lorne Bair.

Lorne Bair Rare Books has issued their latest – Catalog 15. Graphics, Posters, & Original Artworks. Bair's material relates primarily to social and political movements of the late 19th through the 20th century. There is little that comes from what Americans would think of as the mainstream. Most would be considered the far left today - Communists, radical unions, liberation movements. They may not have seemed so far out at the time. Workers had few protections in the early 20th century, leading to reactions that might seem extreme today. Many people turned to Communists in the Depression, but conditions were so bad then that it is not surprising so many thought their economic system had collapsed. While these radical leftists may never have accomplished their stated goals for transforming society, much of the protections workers and ordinary citizens achieved over the years came in response to the even greater demands of the radical movements of the day.

The catalogue is arranged chronoligically, and starts with a cartoon mocking the end of radical Reconstruction in the South. We then move to labor movements, peace drives during the time of the Great War, leftist radical movements in Germany in the 20s, the Spanish Civil War, the Second World War, the Civil Rights movement and the more radical causes that succeeded it, the Cultural Revolution in China, and more recent events from Latin America and the Gay Rights movement.

That is not to say everything in this catalogue comes from the left. There are also items that promote the far right. Not as many, mind you, but a few. Also, unlike most Bair catalogues that are heavily weighted to America, there are many European and Asian items to be found. Political extremes have been even more common in Europe and Asia, and the consequences have often been tragic. Why can't we all just get along? We can't, so here are some samples from these years of conflicts.

Item 6 is titled The Dollar or the Man? The Issue of To Day. It is an album of political cartoons from the pen of Homer Davenport. Davenport was a satirical cartoonist at the dawn of the 20th century (this work was published in 1900). His attacks on political bosses grabbed the attention of William Randolph Hearst of all people, not exactly known for radical politics. Nonetheless, Hearst hired Davenport to draw cartoons for his New York Evening Journal in 1895. Davenport took on the bosses of the day, at one point so enraging Republican boss and Senator Thomas Platt that he attempted (unsuccessfully) to get the New York Legislature to pass a law banning political cartoons. Davenport regularly skewered President McKinley, but was approving of the candidacy of the Progressive Republican Theodore Roosevelt. Davenport ended up being, in a manner of speaking, the last casualty of the Titanic. He was assigned to draw the sinking of the famous ocean liner, and went to the docks to meet the survivors. He caught pneumonia in the cold, damp air and died a few days later. Priced at $350.

Item 12 consists of four posters from the other side of the spectrum. They were created by the National Association of Manufacturers, a very conservative business organization, for posting in the workplace. They are ostensibly very patriotic messages for wartime, the year being 1918. The messages are, basically, work hard and don't complain because this helps the war effort. A cigar-smoking “Agitator” on one poster sews “Strife” and “Disloyal Propaganda.” Bair notes that the caricature looks remarkably like labor organizer Big Bill Haywood. The NAM may have been motivated more by having a low-paid docile labor force than by the war effort. $850.

Item 25 is a poster for a German Communist Party sponsored anti-war rally circa 1924. The artist is unidentified, but looking through a strong light, you can decipher the editorial imprint of Hugo Eberlein, the party's minister of propaganda. Eberlein's name was blocked out in blue ink, and there is a likely explanation for this. Eberlein was an active communist in Germany, but after Hitler came to power, he was forced to flee to the Soviet Union. This might sound like a safe place for a communist, but not in the era of Stalin's purges. Evidently, his factional connections concerned Stalin, so in 1938, Eberlein was exposed to ten days of brutal torture, put in a show trial, convicted and sent to prison for 15 years. Not even this was sufficiently secure, so in 1941, he was brought back to Moscow, tried again, sentenced to death and shot. Any references to Eberlein, who would have become a “non-person” after that, would have been blotted out by the Soviets, the likely explanation for the ink over his name on this poster. Being a good communist was not always enough, though Eberlein was later “rehabilitated” in East Germany. $500.

Rare Book Monthly


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