• <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GUTENBERG BIBLE, MAINZ. Price realized: $5,390,000. Oct 1987, NY.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> LEONARDO DA VINCI, Codex Hammer. Price realized: $30,802,500. Nov 1994 NY
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE FORBES COLLECTION, Price realized: $40,900,000. Mar 2002, New York.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> ANDRE FRANQUIN, SPIROU ET FANTASIO. Price realized: €157,500. Apr 2014, Paris, France.
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GREAT HOURS OF GALEAZZO MARIA SFORZA. Price realized: £1,217,250. Jul 2011, London.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE ROTHSCHILD PRAYERBOOK. A Book of Hours, use of Rome, in Latin. Price realized: $13,605,000.
  • <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> THE <br>QUILL. <i>A Magazine of Greenwich Village</i>. 30 issues, 1918-1925 Estimate: $1,000-2,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> VIEW:<br>The Modern Magazine. Marcel Duchamp number. March, 1945. Estimate: 400-600
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Ortelius, Abraham. Maris Pacifici. [Antwerp], 1589.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Melville, Herman. <i>Moby Dick; or, The Whale</i>. New York, 1851. First American edition, first issue.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers: Fine Books and Manuscripts, May 7, 2015.</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. <i>Works </i>. Garden City, 1930. 24 vols. Signed. 
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Pockocke, Richard. <i>A Description of the East,</i> and Some Other Countries.London, 1743-1745. First edition.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Audubon, John James, after. <i>American Elk - Apiti Deer, Cervus Canadensus</i>, plate LXII, no. 13.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix. Autographed letter signed, July 20, 1832. To Aloys Fuchs.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers: Fine Books and Manuscripts, May 7, 2015.</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Lee, Robert E. Autographed letter signed, to Ulysses S. Grant. February 21, 1865.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Campbell, Colin. <i>Vitruvius Britannicus</i>. London, 1715-125, 1767, 1771. 5 vols. First edition
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Autographed letter signed, 1p., to Judge W.A. Minshall. September 6, 1849.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> A Century <br>of Progress International Exposition. Chicago, 1933-1934. Chicago,<br>(c. 1934). Mayor Cermak copy.).
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> The Nonesuch Dickens. Bloomsbury, 1937-1938. 22 volumes, limited.
  • <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Latest catalogue: 50 Fine Books 2015
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> M. Catesby,<br>The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands (London, 1729-77).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility (London, 1811). First edition of the Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Koronatsionniy sbornik [Album of Nicholas II's coronation] (St. Petersburg, 1899): preferred deluxe version in Russian.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> A complete set of John Gould's magnificent bird books in attractive contemporary bindings (1831-88).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Andy Warhol, Bald Eagle from Endangered Species. Screenprint in colours, 1983, signed in pencil.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Sir Ernest Shackleton, South: The story of Shackleton’s last expedition 1914-1917 (London, 1919).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> J.J. Audubon, The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (NY, 1845-54): The largest successful colour plate book of 19th-century America.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Geoffrey Chaucer, The Works (Kelmscott Press, 1896). One of the finest illustrated books ever produced.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Lev Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (Moscow, 1879):<br>first edition in book form of the celebrated novel.
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Jason Master, Haarlem, c. 1475-80
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Biblia Latina, Paris, 1476-77, first edition of the Vulgate printed in France
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Ludolph of Saxony, Vie du Christ, illuminated by the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse, 1506-08
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>King David, miniature on vellum, Bologna, c. 1470
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible, illuminated in the <i>primo stile</i>, Bologna, c. 1250-70
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - August - 2012 Issue

Five Centuries of Maps from Jonathan Potter Antique Maps

Pottersum12

Summer catalogue from Jonathan Potter.

Jonathan Potter Antique Maps has released their Catalogue Summer 2012. No surprise as to what will be found here – maps. Lots of them. They range from the 15th century to the middle of the 20th. Most are quite old, dating to times when knowledge of geography was still imperfect. One can see the world evolve, at least in the eyes of its beholders, as new discoveries added to mankind's understanding of the world they inhabited. From the 15th century, when to Europeans the known world was a much smaller place, to the discovery of new lands in the East and West, to the refining of the coastlines of these new discoveries, and lastly to understanding the internal regions of these new lands, the evolution of man's understanding of their world can be traced through these maps. Here are some of those steps along the way as seen on the pages of Jonathan Potter's latest catalogue.

We will start with the world as it was known for 1,500 years, perhaps longer, at least to those in the West. There was little difference in the world as it was known in antiquity and at the dawn of the Age of Discovery. In 1493, Hartmann Schedel published his history of the world, known commonly as the Nuremberg Chronicle. Item 1 is the world map from this great work. The world to Europeans had not changed since Greek and Roman times, consisting of Europe, southern Asia, and northern Africa. Schedel's map shows this small world being supported by the three sons of Noah, while various heads blow winds from different directions. Along the side are various strange-looking creatures thought, or perhaps surmised, to live in the far corners of the earth. What Schedel would not have understood as he prepared his work was that a man named Columbus was discovering vast new land masses that would forever change the size and understanding of what was out there. Schedel's map was, in effect, the last look at the ancient Ptolemaic world, soon to be changed forever. Priced at £14,000 (British pounds, or roughly $21,686 U.S. dollars).

Item 4 is a 16th century printing of one of the most important maps ever published, it being one of the first to display the New World. Martin Waldseemuller first published his map of the New World in 1507, calling it “America.” However, when he reprinted it in 1513, he changed it to “Terra Nova,” perhaps recognizing that Columbus, not Amerigo Vespucci, discovered it. By then it was too late. The name “America” had stuck to the land. Laurent Fries republished a smaller size version of Waldseemuller's 1513 atlas four times between 1522 and 1541. Item 4 is taken from the 1541 printing. Fries made some minor changes updating current knowledge, and added a vignette showing some South American cannibals and an opossum. The last two editions of Fries' atlas were published by Michael Servetus, a Spanish cartographer, but also a scientist, humanist, and theologian. That last role got him in much trouble, and reduced the copies of his books available as many were burned. Servetus did not believe in infant baptism, nor did he believe in the orthodox view of the Trinity, arguing that the Trinity represented three aspects of one God, rather than three distinct beings. Such differences could get you in serious trouble in those days, and not even reformist Protestants had much mercy on nonconforming thoughts. Servetus was burned at the stake for his heresies, with John Calvin being a leader in pushing for his execution (Calvin did call for the more merciful beheading, but others overruled his request and burned him alive). £12,800 (US $19,806).

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