Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - June - 2012 Issue

American Manuscripts from the William Reese Co.

Reese292

American Manuscripts.

The William Reese Company is noted for offering rare books in the field of Americana. This latest catalogue is still overwhelmingly Americana, and the items extremely rare as they are unique, but the focus has shifted from books to manuscripts. This is all handwritten material (occasionally a filled-in form), the title being 96 American Manuscripts. No 96 Tears here. This is all exceptional material, and most is not just collectible, but fascinating to read. These are written by witnesses to history, and their observations are perhaps even more interesting to read today. These are a few examples.

Item 4 is a fascinating letter from the founder and Boston patriot Sam Adams, written shortly after independence was secured. It anticipates the division between the more privileged classes of people in America and the ordinary citizens, a division that would lead to the creation of political parties and endless hassles ever since the death of Washington. In this 1784 letter to future Vice-President Eldbridge Gerry, Adams laments George Washington joining the Society of Cincinnati. This society (still in existence today) was formed by American officers of the Revolution, along with their French counterparts who assisted the American cause. The egalitarian-minded Adams is quite concerned about the message – Washington joining a group that denied membership to the ordinary foot soldiers who implemented the officers' plans. Adams remains totally deferential to Washington, not questioning his motives or enormous contributions. Indeed, he explains, “That gentleman has an idea of the nature & tendency of the order very different from mine; otherwise I am certain he would never have given it his sanction. I look upon it to be a rapid stride towards a hereditary military Nobility as ever was made in so short a time.” Sam Adams expresses concern that the sanction of someone so beloved as Washington will unintentionally foster this class division. While praising the American commander, Adams notes, “We ought not however to think any man incapable of error.” Priced at $27,500.

Item 14 is another deeply interesting letter, this one from Delaware Representative James Asheton Bayard, to his cousin Samuel Bayard. If Bayard's name isn't instantly recognizable, his role in the presidential election of 1800 is. In those days, rather than voting separately for president and vice-president, electors voted for the two together. The result was that Thomas Jefferson, the presumptive presidential candidate, and Aaron Burr, the presumptive vice-presidential nominee, each received the same number of votes. The race was thrown into the House of Representatives, where members of the losing Federalist party saw an opportunity for mischief. Intensely disliking Jefferson, they voted for Burr. Jefferson could only carry delegations from 8 states, and 9 were needed. Thirty-five ballots went by this way. Finally, Bayard, who as the lone representative from Delaware, and a Burr supporter for the first 35 ballots, abstained, and helped convince a few others to change their ballots. It resolved what had become an enormous constitutional crisis. It is believed that Alexander Hamilton, an ardent Jefferson opponent who supported him nonetheless, on the grounds that a principled opponent was better than someone with no principles, convinced Bayard. There is also an unproven suspicion that Jefferson agreed not to fire too many Federalist officeholders. In this letter, dated January 30, 1801, less than two weeks before the balloting began, Bayard correctly projects that Burr will get 6 votes, Jefferson 8 (one short of the 9 needed). He fully understands the risks, and writes, “...what increases her [Delaware's] importance has the power of preserving the union from the terrible situation of being without a head.” He also notes that, “One member one way & three the other can turn the scale on either side.” What he could not have realized at the time is that he would be that “one member.” Bayard also has some intriguing comments about the President and fellow Federalist John Adams. His cousin is hoping for an appointment, but Bayard says he cannot make any promises to him. “We know of no scale or even principle of influence with the President. It is harsh to say his appointments are the result of mere caprice, but in fact they are generally unaccountable. Nobody knows who advised nor what motive induced. It is generally thought no one is ever consulted.” $15,000.

Item 11 is what Reese modestly describes as “the greatest Texas letter ever.” Written on February 25, 1836, it comes from the “Father of Texas,” Stephen F. Austin. Austin had started a colony years earlier with the approval of Mexican authorities, but as American and European immigration increased, Mexico became wary. It was no longer so happy with its guests. Santa Anna was already in Texas by this time fighting rebellious Texians. Austin, long cooperative with Mexico, was now on a mission to seek funding and assistance for the revolution. In this letter, he writes to an old friend, General John McCalla of Kentucky, urging him to come to Texas and bring along 2,000 troops. Austin proceeds to describe the countryside in glowing terms (not sure which part of Texas he was talking about) and how cheap the land is. He then describes McCalla's proposed mission in the most glowing and patriotic of terms. “The timid may shrink, the wealthy may buy their gold & stay at home but bold spirits & philanthropic hearts enough will be found who go to Texas & 'do or die.'” Who could resist an entreaty like this? Apparently, McCalla, as we find him still in Kentucky in the 1840s, and later taking an appointment in Washington from President Polk. $375,000.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Exodus 10:10 to 16:15. Complete Biblical scroll sheet in Hebrew, a Torah scroll panel. Middle East, ca. 10th or 11th century.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Copernicus Refuted. (Astronomy.). Scientific manuscript of a course of studies at Collège de la Trinité, Lyon. 1660s.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Israel’s War of Independence and the Early Days of the IDF. 58 photographs presented to Israel Ber, IDF officer and later convicted spy.
    <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Early Unpublished Darwin letter on the races of man. Autograph Letter Signed [to Henry Denny]. Down, Kent, June 1, [1844].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Classic Image of American Slavery. Kimball, M. H. <i>Emancipated Slaves</i>. New York: George Hanks, 1863.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> (Underground Railroad.) Scaggs, Isaac. Important Runaway Slave Poster: $500 Reward Ran away, or decoyed from the subscriber…
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2: Vintage Posters</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> <i>Keep Calm and Carry On</i>, designer unknown, 1939. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, <i>Le Journal / La Traite des Blanches</i>, 1899. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> <i>"Let Us Go Forward Together,"</i> designer unknown, 1940. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2: Vintage Posters</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, <i>Babylone d'Allemagne</i>, 1894. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Frank Beatty, <i>Out of the Running</i>, 1929. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> James Montgomery Flagg, <i>Wake Up America Day</i>, 1917. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2: Vintage Posters</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> <i>Danté / Sim • Sala • Bim!</i>, designer unknown. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>[Zodiac]</i>, 1900. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Rick Griffin, <i>Jimi Hendrix Experience / John Mayall</i>, 1968. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2: Vintage Posters</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Abram Games, <i>Join the ATS</i>, 1941. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Aldo Mazza, <i>Torino / Esposizione Internazionale</i>, 1911. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Robert Motherwell, <i>Julliard School / Dedication - Lincoln Center</i>, 1969. $3,000 to $4,000
  • <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Newton. <i>Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica</i>. London, 1687.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Josephus. <i>De antiquitate Judaica.</i> Lubeck, 1475-76.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Carlerius. <i>Sporta fragmentorum, Sportula fragmentorum</i>. Brussels, 1478-79.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Fridolin. <i>Der Schatzbehalter</i>. Nuremberg, 1491.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Pinder. <i>Der beschlossen gart des rosenkrantz marie</i>. Nuremberg, 1505.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Isidorus Hispalensis. <i>Synonyma de Homine</i>. Nuremberg, 1470-71.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Durer. Sammelband including <i>Underweysung der messing</i>. Nuremberg, 1525-29.
  • <b>Booth & Williams: NO RESERVE Rare Book Auction, now through July 23, 7:15PM EDT</b>
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> John Muir. <i>My First Summer in the Sierra</i>, Boston, 1911.
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> Ernest Hemingway. <i>For Whom the Bell Tolls</i>, New York, 1940. First edition later printing.
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> Upton Sinclair. <i>The Jungle</i>, New York, 1906. First edition.
    <b>Booth & Williams: NO RESERVE Rare Book Auction, now through July 23, 7:15PM EDT</b>
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> George Orwell. <i>Nineteen Eighty-Four</i>, 1949. First American edition.
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> Harper Lee. <i>To Kill a Mocking Bird</i>, 1960. Early printing.
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> Richard Wright. <i>Native Son</i>, New York, 1940. First edition.
    <b>Booth & Williams: NO RESERVE Rare Book Auction, now through July 23, 7:15PM EDT</b>
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> Dryden, Congreve, and others. <i>Ovid’s Art of Love</i>, London, 1764. English translation of Ovid’s work.
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> S. E. Hinton. <i>The Outsiders</i>, New York, 1967. First edition.
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> J. D. Salinger. <i>The Catcher in the Rye</i>, Boston, 1951. Book club edition.
    <b>Booth & Williams: NO RESERVE Rare Book Auction, now through July 23, 7:15PM EDT</b>
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> Ayn Rand. <i>Atlas Shrugged</i>, New York, 1957. Early printing.
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> J. D. Salinger. <i>Raise High The Roof Beam, Carpenters</i> and <i>Seymour: An Introduction</i>, Boston, 1963. First [book] edition, third state.
    <b>Booth & Williams No Reserve Sale until Jul 23:</b> Tennessee Williams. <i>Sweet Bird of Youth</i>, 1959. First edition.
  • <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>

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